Quantcast

Mash tun kettle

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

lenohallock

Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2012
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
This may seem like a stupid question, but why does it seem like people tend to heat their mash water in the hlt then transfer to their mash tun when they have a kettle style mash tun. Why not just heat the water in the mash tun then add the grains?
 

Singletrack

Because it's judgement that defeats us.
Joined
Sep 12, 2014
Messages
1,058
Reaction score
396
Location
So Cal
1. Now you're going to make "people" feel stupid.

2. Because they have a HLT and they want to use it.

3. Who does this? We need names, so we can make fun of them properly.

4. Maybe they are only heating sparge water this way?
 

stella_tigre

Queen of the Upper Mississippi
Joined
Jan 20, 2015
Messages
788
Reaction score
295
Location
Harpers Ferry
Maybe the mash tun kettle only has a small burner to maintain heat, and the HLT has a big one?
Just guessing....
 

arnobg

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2015
Messages
1,455
Reaction score
364
Location
Memphis
As a newer brewer I have a question... Why do people fly sparge and use two pieces or more of equipment when they can just BIAB and have a shorter/cheaper brew day?
 

RM-MN

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Nov 26, 2010
Messages
14,476
Reaction score
5,208
Location
Solway
As a newer brewer I have a question... Why do people fly sparge and use two pieces or more of equipment when they can just BIAB and have a shorter/cheaper brew day?
Because it's TRADITION! and because they have more equipment to impress their friend and can take more time brewing so they have time to drink more beer.:rockin:
 

cyanmonkey

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
Messages
1,074
Reaction score
153
As a newer brewer I have a question... Why do people fly sparge and use two pieces or more of equipment when they can just BIAB and have a shorter/cheaper brew day?

Because it's fun.

Also you get better efficiency...not that you can't spend an extra $2 for some base malt to make up for it, but you don't brew just to get the beer.

For me it's like fishing. You don't fish to eat. Yeah you get to eat the fish, but it's about being on the lake, in nature, with a friend. It's about the process.
 

RM-MN

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Nov 26, 2010
Messages
14,476
Reaction score
5,208
Location
Solway
Chickypad knows that I typically get over 85% efficiency with BIAB. Many 3 vessel brewers don't exceed 75%. My first batch I brewed BIAB full volume, no sparge got me 80%. I'm not the only one that gets that kind of efficiency with BIAB and I'm not the highest either.
 

cyanmonkey

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
Messages
1,074
Reaction score
153
Chickypad knows that I typically get over 85% efficiency with BIAB. Many 3 vessel brewers don't exceed 75%. My first batch I brewed BIAB full volume, no sparge got me 80%. I'm not the only one that gets that kind of efficiency with BIAB and I'm not the highest either.

Are you a wizard? What do you do to get such high efficiency? I've done BIAB a few times and have gotten 72% consistently.
 

chickypad

lupulin shift victim
Joined
Jul 19, 2010
Messages
5,820
Reaction score
1,342
Location
SF Peninsula
Yes sorry if that was cryptic, I worked the graveyard last night and posted before my nap. As an experienced BIAB brewer RM-MN is good at dispelling some of the myths that go around, such as that BIAB = sacrificing efficiency. Many of us who have brewed different systems know that is not the case.
:mug:
 

RM-MN

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Nov 26, 2010
Messages
14,476
Reaction score
5,208
Location
Solway
Are you a wizard? What do you do to get such high efficiency? I've done BIAB a few times and have gotten 72% consistently.
One of the advantages of BIAB is the bag as you don't need to depend on the grain husks for forming a filter bed. Without needing the husks intact you can mill much finer and with that finer milling comes increased efficiency. Mill your grains until they look like cornmeal. Some have even gone to using the blender to mill them finer (small quantities for small batches).
 

cyanmonkey

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
Messages
1,074
Reaction score
153
One of the advantages of BIAB is the bag as you don't need to depend on the grain husks for forming a filter bed. Without needing the husks intact you can mill much finer and with that finer milling comes increased efficiency. Mill your grains until they look like cornmeal. Some have even gone to using the blender to mill them finer (small quantities for small batches).

Do you have to pay more attention to ph to avoid astringency? Also, how clear is your wort transfer?
 

Singletrack

Because it's judgement that defeats us.
Joined
Sep 12, 2014
Messages
1,058
Reaction score
396
Location
So Cal
And the biggest thing about the BIAB to me, as I said before, is that I feel like you're losing some of the goodness the grains have to offer in the middle of the bag.

BIABers always looking for disciples. There could be anything trapped in the middle of that bag of grain.
Goodness? Sure.
Tradition? No doubt.
Dignity? Check.
Porcupine? Probably.
Old shoes? Could be.
Meat loaf? It's happened.
This thread may have gotten derailed somehow. Hope this helps. :)
 

chickypad

lupulin shift victim
Joined
Jul 19, 2010
Messages
5,820
Reaction score
1,342
Location
SF Peninsula
Do you have to pay more attention to ph to avoid astringency? Also, how clear is your wort transfer?
Everyone needs to pay attention to pH to avoid astringency, the main potential issue with BIAB is the often thinner mash which can exacerbate water issues. Not sure about what the others experience but for my BIAB batches the wort in the kettle is hella cloudy, coming out of the kettle and finished beers are clear.
 

RM-MN

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Nov 26, 2010
Messages
14,476
Reaction score
5,208
Location
Solway
I always thought that the goal was to get clear beer, not clear wort. Other than a taste I never drink wort anyway. The wort is always really cloudy but that clears up in the fermenter and clear beer is the result.
 

cyanmonkey

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
Messages
1,074
Reaction score
153
I always thought that the goal was to get clear beer, not clear wort. Other than a taste I never drink wort anyway. The wort is always really cloudy but that clears up in the fermenter and clear beer is the result.

Well, the only negative I could think of is having a lot more trub than with a three vessel system and resulting in less beer, but I'm sure it's fairly negligible.
 

tennesseean_87

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2011
Messages
1,759
Reaction score
221
Location
Albuquerque
I do fly sparging for the efficiency I get opposed to BIAB (my BIAB-fu needs work), and because I have a 6 gallon bucket-tun that I can't brew ful-volume in unless I go for smaller beers. My pots are 4-gallon (stove-top boils), so that would severely limit BIAB batch size, even with a sparge step. When I can I really want to go eBIAB for a quicker brew-day, even if I sacrifice efficiency (which may not happen).
 
Top