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Mash schedule for Flander's Red

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Edcculus

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For anyone that has brewed a Flanders Red, what mash schedule do you use? I was trying to set up my recipe in Beersmith last night and became a little stumped with the mash schedule.

Jeff Sparrow calls for a triple infusion with cereal mash for the corn. It seems that he is using the boiling corn mash to reach one of the rests.

I can't really figure out how to set this up. Plus, my tun is only 5 gallons, so I can't do a triple infusion easily.

Is this mash very important? Jeff seems to be saying Flander's brewers like an infusion mash because it makes a very fermentable wort. That is opposed to a turbid mash in a lambic, which leaves behind a lot of starches. With the highly modified malts we have, its it that important to hit all of these rests? Also, since a fermentable wort is more desirable for a Flanders, could a decoction mash be used?
 

z987k

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why would a more fermentble wort be desired in a flanders? You still need a lot of long chain dextrins to support a 1yr+ fermentation.
 

carnevoodoo

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Sparrow also suggests a single step (From BYO in 2007 "I've been experimenting with a single step of about 158 °F (70 °C), to promote the formation of "unfermentable sugar" to make the yeast and bacteria work a little harder.") is probably sufficient.

You don't want to ferment too low on this one. You do want the bacteria to take its time.
 
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Edcculus

Edcculus

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why would a more fermentble wort be desired in a flanders? You still need a lot of long chain dextrins to support a 1yr+ fermentation.
I'm going to have to go back and read the chapter again. I think you want to support more lacto growth than brett.
 

peck

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The first time I made a Flanders I did a long, complex, labor intensive decoction mash. After that I did as below and it worked fine.

Sparrow also suggests a single step (From BYO in 2007 "I've been experimenting with a single step of about 158 °F (70 °C), to promote the formation of "unfermentable sugar" to make the yeast and bacteria work a little harder.") is probably sufficient.

You don't want to ferment too low on this one. You do want the bacteria to take its time.
 
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