Mash procedure for Unmalted Wheat and Malted Oats?

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Yooper

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No, you can mash that as usual. It might be a bit stickier, so if you're not brewing in a bag, you could add some rice hulls to help with lautering, but even so it should be fine.
I've never heard of "malted naked oats" except as golden naked oats, which is a crystal/caramel malt without a husk- so it's really just like any other crystal malt.
 

RustyHorn

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No, you can mash that as usual. It might be a bit stickier, so if you're not brewing in a bag, you could add some rice hulls to help with lautering, but even so it should be fine.
I've never heard of "malted naked oats" except as golden naked oats, which is a crystal/caramel malt without a husk- so it's really just like any other crystal malt.
Naked oats are huskless oats. Golden Naked Oats, like you say, are different (and yummy!)
 
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snarf7

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My gravity came out a little lower than expected...I usually get 75-85% efficiency but with this batch I only got 65%. The oats were pre-crushed from Northern Brewer but I wonder if maybe a little more milling might have helped?
 

dmtaylor

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NB doesn't do a good job crushing their malts. So yeah, crush a little harder.

And yeah, add a pound of rice hulls to a high oat & unmalted wheat grist.
 

Dgallo

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Malted oats are smaller then barley so sometimes it helps to tighten the mill. since they came in premilled I doubt that NB or their supplier changes their gap to accommodate. I had a big issue with morebeers crush a month or so ago. Very poor and I was only in the high 50s for efficiency. They ended up fixing for me though which was nice.
 

IslandLizard

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What was the "Unmalted Wheat?" Flaked wheat or cracked wheat berries?

I'm with the others on the piss-poor crush you generally get from those outfits, especially for smaller kernel grain such as oats, wheat, rye, etc. Most LHBS mills are set way too coarsely too, even for barley. Small kernels fare much worse, they barely get crushed, if at all.

Look into milling your own. A properly adjusted $25 Corona/Victory knock off corn grinder works like a charm, without spending $100 or more on a roller mill.
 
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snarf7

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What was the "Unmalted Wheat?" Flaked wheat or cracked wheat berries?
it was the cracked kernels...I haven't had any issues with the grains I buy from NB but I usually buy just base malts from them because of the larger quantities and free shipping. Specialty malts I usually pick up at my local homebrew shop where they have their own mill you can use as you need.
 

IslandLizard

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it was the cracked kernels...I haven't had any issues with the grains I buy from NB but I usually buy just base malts from them because of the larger quantities and free shipping. Specialty malts I usually pick up at my local homebrew shop where they have their own mill you can use as you need.
That may have been part of your lower mash efficiency too. Especially together with coarse milling. Wheat gelatinizes at 150-158F and the fairly large, dense bits take much longer to fully rehydrate than flaked goods, which are pregelatinized already by the rolling/flaking process. A cereal mash is typically the best when dealing with raw wheat berries/bits.
 

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