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March Pump - possibly dumb question

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Gordie

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So I'm looking to mount two March pumps on either side of a support beam - Brutus style - and I saw that they both have the output mounted facing the same direction.

This leads me to the problem that if I mount them on opposite sides of the same post, the output for one of the pumps will be facing down - which is bad.

So my possibly dumb question is whether its as simple as unscrewing the pump head and turning it around or whether there is some gremlin hidden here...

Thanks.
 

Desert_Sky

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yes, its very simple


The pump is magnetic, meaning no shaft connected to the motor. There is a gasket, make sure you dont pinch it when putting hte head back on
 

natehilde

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So I'm looking to mount two March pumps on either side of a support beam - Brutus style - and I saw that they both have the output mounted facing the same direction.

This leads me to the problem that if I mount them on opposite sides of the same post, the output for one of the pumps will be facing down - which is bad.

So my possibly dumb question is whether its as simple as unscrewing the pump head and turning it around or whether there is some gremlin hidden here...

Thanks.
I will tell you that you probably shouldn't remove the pump casing from the motor. Not really a great idea.

I don't really understand your problem. The idea of a pump is to provide what is known as flow-work. It simply raises the pressure of a fluid to provide flow from one place to another. Really, the only consideration for pump mounting, in terms of flow, is that the suction of the pump is far enough below the tank to achieve the proper Net Positive Suction Head in order to allow the pump to work correctly. In other words, you have to have enough pressure due to fluid height to ensure the suction of the pump remains flooded with liquid. The direction of the inlet and outlet don't matter in terms of proper pump operation.
 

natehilde

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yes, its very simple


The pump is magnetic, meaning no shaft connected to the motor. There is a gasket, make sure you dont pinch it when putting hte head back on
Ah yes, I'm a dumba$$, I forgot they are magnetic drive.
 

GearBeer

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There ya go.
In case anyone is considering removing the pump head, you should remember that gaskets lose 30% of their sealing pressure on retorque.
 

Bobby_M

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The pump head is actually two parts. The overall head is attached to motor with 4 screws and there is no seal there. You can remove the screws in order to rotate the head to any of four positions (so the output is always facing up for easy priming). Then there's the impellor housing on the front of the head. Removing those screws lets you clean out the liquid path or change the impellor. There is a seal there.
 

lustreking

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There ya go.
In case anyone is considering removing the pump head, you should remember that gaskets lose 30% of their sealing pressure on retorque.
In case anyone is considering removing the pump head, you should remember that you don't have to deal with with the gasket unless you take the pump head apart.


Don't worry about the gasket, the head comes off in one piece. Just rotate it!
 

Bobby_M

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I will tell you that you probably shouldn't remove the pump casing from the motor. Not really a great idea.

I don't really understand your problem. The idea of a pump is to provide what is known as flow-work. It simply raises the pressure of a fluid to provide flow from one place to another. Really, the only consideration for pump mounting, in terms of flow, is that the suction of the pump is far enough below the tank to achieve the proper Net Positive Suction Head in order to allow the pump to work correctly. In other words, you have to have enough pressure due to fluid height to ensure the suction of the pump remains flooded with liquid. The direction of the inlet and outlet don't matter in terms of proper pump operation.
I don't want to argue but I disagree. Anyone that has used a March 809 will agree that getting the pump to prime with the outlet facing up is much easier since air always finds the highest point. The pump head is magnetically driven centrifical and doesn't provide suction.
 

lustreking

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Here's a 'sploded view:



Take out screws marked "1" and you can rotate the head, take out screws marked "10" and you can take the head apart.
 

Desert_Sky

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I don't want to argue but I disagree. Anyone that has used a March 809 will agree that getting the pump to prime with the outlet facing up is much easier since air always finds the highest point. The pump head is magnetically driven centrifical and doesn't provide suction.

yep what he said

My buddy is using his pump horizontally. He has to deal with air getting trapped in the pump housing until it works it's way out. Having the output on the top portion allows the air bubbles to escape very easily, making priming nothing more than opening a valve and maybe cycling the pump once or twice
 
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Gordie

Gordie

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Here's a 'sploded view:



Take out screws marked "1" and you can rotate the head, take out screws marked "10" and you can take the head apart.
Dude - thanks for the 'splosion! Mighty helpful. And ditto on the output-up-to-prime thoughts - I consider that an essential design element...
 

natehilde

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yep what he said

My buddy is using his pump horizontally. He has to deal with air getting trapped in the pump housing until it works it's way out. Having the output on the top portion allows the air bubbles to escape very easily, making priming nothing more than opening a valve and maybe cycling the pump once or twice
I have a pump casing vent installed. Once the pump is primed and vented, it's smooth sailing.
 
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