Mango Wine tastes sour after primary fermentation

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

avnthk

Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Hi Guys,

This is my first attempt to brewing and the first post on the forum as well.

So I am try to brew mango Wine as it's mango season in India.

My ingredients

1.5 Kg of Mangoes fully ripe
1 kg of sugar
3.5 liters of water
250 grams of Grapes
1 small lemon

As it's really difficult to get professional yeast here, I added activated yeast on one day later. The yeast packing had wine as one of the application.

I put pieces of mangoes half with skin and half without skin. One mango stone as well. I also left lemon skin inside the fermentor. This was as shown in an online recipe I watched on YouTube.

I didn't have any instruments to measure initial gravity so didn't measure.

After 7 days today when I'm about to shift it to other carboy, I tasted it and it tastes sour. What could be the issue ?

I kept an airlock which was bubbling as well so I'm considering oxidation is not the reason.

Has it gone bad? Can it be salvaged? Please advise.
 

Raptor99

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2020
Messages
64
Reaction score
42
Welcome to HBT. I love mangoes! You are lucky to have enough to make wine.

It's difficult to tell without a hydrometer reading, but if it was fermenting well for 7 days then it is possible that fermentation is nearly complete. It is normal for fruit wines to taste sour at this point. It need time to mature and age. If the lemon peel, including the pith, is in the fermenter for too long it can contribute bitter flavors.

When you siphon it to the other carboy, leave behind all the fruit pulp and lemon skin. Keep it full with very little airspace and leave it alone for several month under an airlock.

After it has aged for several months you might want to stabilize it with potassium metabisulfite and potassium sorbate. Then you can backsweeten to balance out the acidity and alcohol.
 

bernardsmith

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
5,375
Reaction score
1,827
Location
Saratoga Springs
Hi Avnthk, and welcome.
You say the wine tastes "sour".
I wonder if you added the whole lemon peel or simply the zest? The pith can be very bitter (not really sour).
You also mentioned that you added grapes. Were these table or wine grapes? Were the properly ripe? They may have a great deal of acidity.
The other thought I have is that the yeast fermented all the sugar and you are tasting mangoes without any sweetness and you are perceiving this as "sour". You really do need an hydrometer to know where the wine is in the process: let me assume that 1 kg (2.2 lbs) of sugar added to 3.5 L of water will raise the gravity of the water to 1.085 (+/-). How sweet are mangoes? How much sugar do they contain? If you juiced a mango what would the specific gravity be (let me "guess" about 1.030 /gallon of juice but how much juice would be in 3lbs of mangoes. Let me guesstimate that we are dealing with a starting gravity of about 1.100 (or a potential ABV of about 13%). If you could measure the specific gravity today you would know how much sugar is remaining (today) and how much alcohol (approximately) the yeast has produced.
 
OP
A

avnthk

Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Welcome to HBT. I love mangoes! You are lucky to have enough to make wine.

It's difficult to tell without a hydrometer reading, but if it was fermenting well for 7 days then it is possible that fermentation is nearly complete. It is normal for fruit wines to taste sour at this point. It need time to mature and age. If the lemon peel, including the pith, is in the fermenter for too long it can contribute bitter flavors.

When you siphon it to the other carboy, leave behind all the fruit pulp and lemon skin. Keep it full with very little airspace and leave it alone for several month under an airlock.

After it has aged for several months you might want to stabilize it with potassium metabisulfite and potassium sorbate. Then you can backsweeten to balance out the acidity and alcohol.
Hi Raptor,

Thanks for the warm welcome and your detailed reply. 😀😀

I had just done the same thing in the morning out of panic. Only one extra thing I did was after transferring it to new carboy, I added ~100 gms of sugar diluted in 300 ml of water.

Have ordered both the additives. Was just curious, should I add pinch of sodium metabisulfite in the carboy in next 4-5 days (it'll arrive by that) to avoid any probable oxidation from racking?

Postassium Sorbate anyway will be used just before bottling.

Would love to know your thoughts.

Thanks in anticipation.

PS: Btw I measured brix value before the transfer it was approximately 18.5, which means the SG should be around 1.075.
 
Last edited:
OP
A

avnthk

Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Hi Avnthk, and welcome.
You say the wine tastes "sour".
I wonder if you added the whole lemon peel or simply the zest? The pith can be very bitter (not really sour).
You also mentioned that you added grapes. Were these table or wine grapes? Were the properly ripe? They may have a great deal of acidity.
The other thought I have is that the yeast fermented all the sugar and you are tasting mangoes without any sweetness and you are perceiving this as "sour". You really do need an hydrometer to know where the wine is in the process: let me assume that 1 kg (2.2 lbs) of sugar added to 3.5 L of water will raise the gravity of the water to 1.085 (+/-). How sweet are mangoes? How much sugar do they contain? If you juiced a mango what would the specific gravity be (let me "guess" about 1.030 /gallon of juice but how much juice would be in 3lbs of mangoes. Let me guesstimate that we are dealing with a starting gravity of about 1.100 (or a potential ABV of about 13%). If you could measure the specific gravity today you would know how much sugar is remaining (today) and how much alcohol (approximately) the yeast has produced.

Hey BernardSmith,

Let me thank you for the warm welcome and your detailed reply 😊😊😊.

Man, based on your gestimates you sound quite an expierenced felow.

I squeezed the juice of lemon inside the mixture and then left the whole skin inside the mixture.

The grapes were white and really sweet. In here we don't differentiate between table and wine grapes but from my discription it may fall under table

My present brix value measured was 18.5 which converts SG into 1.075.

I had completed my primary racking. Only one extra thing I did was after transferring it to new carboy, I added ~100 gms of sugar diluted in 300 ml of water.

Have ordered metabisulfite and sobate, the additives. Was just curious, should I add pinch of sodium metabisulfite in the carboy in next 4-5 days (it'll arrive by that) to avoid any probable oxidation from racking?

Postassium Sorbate anyway will be used just before bottling.

Would love to know your thoughts.

Thanks in anticipation.

PS- The way you guesstimated, you sound with lot of technical expertise in the field.
 

Raptor99

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2020
Messages
64
Reaction score
42
Any more sugar that you add at this point will be used by the yeast to produce more alcohol. If you want to sweeten it, you must first stabilize it with Kmeta and Ksorbate.

It is a good idea to add Kmeta when racking. Most of us prefer potassium metabisulfite (Kmeta) rather than sodium metabisulfite because we don't want to add extra sodium. Back in my parents' time, sodium metabisulfite was commonly used. So that would work as well. The amount to add depends on the pH, but the default is 1 campden tablet per gallon, which is equivalent to 0.44 g of the Kmeta powder.

The Brix measurement is affected by the presence of alcohol once fermentation has started, so to find the current SG you need to use the original Brix in a calculator like this: Homebrew Refractometer Calculator If you don't know your original Brix, then it would be best to use a hydrometer to measure SG.
 
OP
A

avnthk

Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Hi Raptor,

Thanks for your prompt response.

What are your thoughts on balancing out acidity with sodium bicarbonate powder, just before bottling, of course if it still tastes sour?
 

Raptor99

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2020
Messages
64
Reaction score
42
I would not try to adjust the pH without an accurate reading using a pH meter. The usual target pH is around 3.4. If you raise the pH too high the wine will spoil much more easily. If you test and discover that the pH is below 3.0 you can use potassium bicarbonate or calcium carbonate to raise the pH a little bit at a time. Assuming that the pH was in the right range at the beginning, when you backsweeten it will balance out the sourness.

When you get ready to bottle, after at least 4-5 months of bulk aging, then you can stabilize and sweeten. At that time you can sweeten a small sample to see how much sugar you need and how the flavors balance. You need to balance acid, tannins, alcohol, and sweetness in a way that brings out rather than masks the fruit flavor. Getting it right is a real art that takes practice and lots of patience.
 

bernardsmith

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
5,375
Reaction score
1,827
Location
Saratoga Springs
Hi Raptor,

Thanks for the warm welcome and your detailed reply. 😀😀

I had just done the same thing in the morning out of panic. Only one extra thing I did was after transferring it to new carboy, I added ~100 gms of sugar diluted in 300 ml of water.

Have ordered both the additives. Was just curious, should I add pinch of sodium metabisulfite in the carboy in next 4-5 days (it'll arrive by that) to avoid any probable oxidation from racking?

Postassium Sorbate anyway will be used just before bottling.

Would love to know your thoughts.

Thanks in anticipation.

PS: Btw I measured brix value before the transfer it was approximately 18.5, which means the SG should be around 1.075.
Always useful to add K-meta as you rack. Certainly never does any harm as long as you are not adding the same amount if K-meta as you would if sanitizing (2 oz /gallon). Campden tablets are designed to provide about 50 ppm of free SO2 if you crush ONE per gallon. and 50 ppm is more or less all you need for normal ranges of pH (about 3.0 - 3.5 )
 

Orval

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2021
Messages
60
Reaction score
10
After 7 days today when I'm about to shift it to other carboy, I tasted it and it tastes sour. What could be the issue ?
What kind of sour taste? If it's like vinegar, then you got some contamination, and you could get some good vinegar... If it's like a very dry white wine, this is normal, there's no residual sugar. I'm not sure whether a mango wine will have a malo-lactic fermentation, just wait a while. In the future, add some potassium metabisulfite to kill unwanted germs. I've lots of mangoes and pineapples we cannot sell because of covid ( no tourists to the local fruit market-Ban Ray Muang-Loei-Thailand) but I'm not ready to process them. Local people make wine by adding boiling water to sanitize the chopped fruits, some boil the fruits, but this will affect the taste (pineapple, but I would do the same with mangoes). I'm using instant baker's yeast that I activate before adding it to the fermenter, fruit t° must be around 25°C though (Max:35°C!)
 
Top