Mango IPA recipe suggestions

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
Hello Guys,
First I would like to thank you guys, I am learning a lot from the forum. You are awesome!
I have been itching to try a Mango IPA and have mixed a few recipes I found online here and looking for suggestions and tips. This will be my fourth batch so not an expert.
Speciality Grains:
2-Row Pale 3 lb Milled - 2lb
German Munich 1 lb Milled- 8oz
Honey Malt 1 lb Milled - 4oz
What do you think about me using Flacked Oats - 1lb?
Malt Extract:
Pilsen Briess Dry Malt Extract - 6lb

Hops:
Columbus, 8g - 60 min
Cascade, 24g - 30 min
Columbus, 24g - 10 min
Amarillo, 24g - 5 min
Citra, 24g - 5 min
Citra, 2oz - Dry Hop

Yeast.
US-05 orWhite Labs East Coast Ale yeast or OYL200 Tropical IPA- Omega yeast.

I am planning to Dry hop and add 5lb of Mango puree, on Day 10 and Keg/bottle on Day 14/15. I won't be doing a secondary as I just use the buckets and I am worried about oxygen contamination.
Does this sound ok?
Also have any of you tried Fierce fruit purees?
Thank you!
 
Last edited:

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
Only the Honey Malt is a "specialty grain." The previous 2 are base malts.
Are you going to properly mash those? *

If so, you can add your flaked oats to them as well:
What do you think about me using Flacked Oats - 1lb?
Flaked goods need to be mashed, steeping won't do any good.

Steeping and mashing are similar processes, but with noted differences. Make sure to understand those differences.

* Basically, steeping is dissolving sugars, flavor, aroma, and color compounds contained in certain processed malts, similar to steeping tea.
Mashing is converting starches to sugars (and dextrins), while also extracting flavor and aroma. When mashing you can add your steeping grains to the mash. But not the other way around.
 
Last edited:

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
BTW, welcome to HBT!

You can learn a lot from discussions in other threads, such as this one:

I've removed the post you made in there as it's the same as you posted here. It's always much better start your own thread, so you can get your answers and keep related discussion here, where it belongs.
Duplicate posts are never helpful, only cause confusion and needlessly duplicates efforts!
 
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
Are you going to properly mash those? *

If so, you can add your flaked oats to them as well:

Flaked goods need to be mashed, steeping won't do any good.

Steeping and mashing are similar processes, but with noted differences. Make sure to understand those differences.

* Basically, steeping is dissolving sugars in specially processed malts, like steeping tea.
Mashing is converting starches to sugars (and dextrins). When mashing you can add your steeping grains to the mash. But not the other way around.
Oh makes sense, I was just going to steep them. I don't have the cooler have the cooler mods to mash yet.
Would I be ok Steeping the other two grains?
 
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
BTW, welcome to HBT!

You can learn a lot from discussions in other threads, such as this one:

I've removed the post you made in there as it's the same as you posted here. It's always much better start your own thread, so you can get your answers and keep related discussion here, where it belongs.
Duplicate posts are never helpful, only cause confusion and needlessly duplicates efforts!
Got it, Thank you!
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
Oh makes sense, I was just going to steep them. I don't have the cooler have the cooler mods to mash yet.
Would I be ok Steeping the other two grains?
No, they need to be mashed.
You can mash them in a large kitchen pot kept at 150-156F for an hour. Wrap a thick blanket around it, or place in a warm but turned off oven. Then strain (colander or sieve) and sparge (rinse) once or twice. That wort is then (part of) your base, which you boil, add hops and your extracts.

BTW, I've edited my first reply (in post #2)
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
I will Mash these

2-Row Pale 3 lb Milled - 2lb
German Munich 1 lb Milled- 8oz
Honey Malt 1 lb Milled - 4oz and
Flaked oats - 1lb
Yes!
Read up on mashing.
You're actually doing a "mini mash" or "partial mash" here, as you also use an extract for your total sugars/gravity.

For mashing you want to use certain amount of water, not too much, not too little:
A water to grain ratio of 1.25 - 1.5 quarts / pound of grain works great and you won't need a super large pot to do this.

Your grain needs to be milled of course. Your flaked goods (e.g., flaked oats), can be used in the mash, as is, without milling, although they could be milled too.

and then add 6lb light DME and start the boiling?
Are you boiling the full volume (5-6 gallons) or doing a "partial boil," boiling a smaller volume (say 2-3 gallons) and top up with water in your fermenter?

Especially with partial boils, using top up water later, but also when doing full volume boils, you don't want to boil all that extract for an hour. Only add 1/3 to 1/2 of it at the beginning and the rest at flameout.
It increases your hop utilization (efficiency of bittering reactions), while reducing caramelization at the same time.

I am trying to do a 5 gallon batch and would it make it too thick for an IPA?
Anywhere between 1.055-1.065 is a nice gravity for IPAs.
 
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
Are you boiling the full volume (5-6 gallons) or doing a "partial boil," boiling a smaller volume (say 2-3 gallons) and top up with water in your fermenter?
I was planning to do a partial boil so I will make sure to not add all the extracts at the beginning.


Anywhere between 1.055-1.065 is a nice gravity for IPAs.
Great, Thank you! Appreciate all the help.

One last question (Hopefully).
What do you think about adding the Hops and mango puree on Day 10 and Kegging 4 days after that?
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
Great, Thank you! Appreciate all the help.

One last question (Hopefully).
What do you think about adding the Hops and mango puree on Day 10 and Kegging 4 days after that?
YVW!
Yeah, don't use a secondary, oxygen is your IPA's biggest enemy.

I'd dry hop and add the fruit puree when fermentation has slowed down quite a bit. Be it as soon as after 5 days or 10 days.
If you can find a way to do that without removing the lid, all the better.

You can suck-siphon a hydrometer sample out through the airlock hole, using a skinny 5/16" OD 2' piece of hose, leaving the lid in place.
 
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
YVW!
Yeah, don't use a secondary, oxygen is your IPA's biggest enemy.

I'd dry hop and add the fruit puree when fermentation has slowed down quite a bit. Be it as soon as after 5 days or 10 days.
If you can find a way to do that without removing the lid, all the better.

You can suck-siphon a hydrometer sample out through the airlock hole, using a skinny 5/16" OD 2' piece of hose, leaving the lid in place.
Perfect, I should be able to do that! Thank you

One last question (Hopefully).
What do you think about adding the Hops and mango puree on Day 10 and Kegging 4 days after that?
I Lied :-/
Do you think I can get away with the good old safale US-05 or do you think it is better to use something else?
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
US-05 is A-OK for an IPA!

Your fruit puree will likely kick up fermentation somewhat. When that has subsided, keg it.

If it hasn't been part of your kegging routine yet, look into transferring your beer into a 100% liquid pre-purged keg. Fill through the liquid-out post with your racking hose attached to a QD. The lid stays locked on the keg until your next cleaning.
 
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
Great, Thank you so much for being so patient and answering all my questions and some!
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
Great, Thank you so much for being so patient and answering all my questions and some!
That's what the forum is for! Glad I could help.

I've drilled a stoppered 1" access hole in my bucket lids to add purees, syrups, dry hops, etc. while streaming CO2 in through the airlock hole. That way no or very little air can get in, and the lid stays on!

I can also stir through that same hole with the back end of a long plastic brew spoon. Then purge the headspace a few times. My bucket lids seal well, they bulge under 8-12 psi. That's about as far as I dare to take them. ;)
It works like a charm!
 
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
Thanks to you, I finally am ready for the Mango IPA (After 2 months).
so now I have an Anvil foundry 10.5G and I am trying to figure out how to do partial mash in it. Please correct me if I am doing something wrong.
1) Heat 1G of strike water (As I only have around 3.75lb of grains)
2) Add the grains and mash
3) Sparge with 6G of water.
4) Boil the water and add around 2lb of the extract.
5) Add Hops
6) Towards the end of the boil, Add the rest of the extract.

Does it seem right?
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
Thanks to you, I finally am ready for the Mango IPA (After 2 months).
so now I have an Anvil foundry 10.5G and I am trying to figure out how to do partial mash in it. Please correct me if I am doing something wrong.
1) Heat 1G of strike water (As I only have around 3.75lb of grains)
2) Add the grains and mash
3) Sparge with 6G of water.
4) Boil the water and add around 2lb of the extract.
5) Add Hops
6) Towards the end of the boil, Add the rest of the extract.

Does it seem right?
Good to hear you're ready for brewing! :rock:

Sorry, but no, that doesn't look quite right...
3.75# of grain needs 6 quarts of water to get to an average mash ratio of around 1.5 (qts/lb). Many brewers will use more water, especially in BIAB environments such as your Foundry.

Most likely there's also a minimum amount of mash volume necessary for the Foundry for it to work properly, especially on the larger, 10-11 gallon model. It's the amount of dead space underneath the basket that determines that.

Also need to watch out for not over-sparging as that may extract tannins. 1 gallon of strike water and 5 gallons of sparge water is out of bounds. Usually we target between 30 : 70% and 70 : 30% strike : sparge water depending on the system, recipe, equipment, and brewer's preferences.

For batch sparging around 50 : 50% is very common. Then splitting the (50%) sparge water again in 2 equal halves to perform 2 sparges in sequence.
 
Last edited:
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
Ah makes sense! Thank you so much for yet another detailed response Island lizard. Should I just use Pilsen malt instead of the Pilsen DME and save it for a rainy day? I see that people do a 90 minute boil for the Pilsen, do I do that? Also if I’m getting new Malt should I just go with 2-row pale? Appreciate the responses!
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
Ah makes sense! Thank you so much for yet another detailed response Island lizard. Should I just use Pilsen malt instead of the Pilsen DME and save it for a rainy day? I see that people do a 90 minute boil for the Pilsen, do I do that? Also if I’m getting new Malt should I just go with 2-row pale? Appreciate the responses!
YVW!

Since you're doing a mash in your new kettle, you may as well do it all grain. The mash will still take an hour, whether you mash 4 pounds or 14 pounds. Save the Pilsen DME for making yeast starters. Just keep it dry, in a well sealed bag.

Extracts are for those brewers not using base malts (they don't mash), or doing a partial mash to convert certain adjuncts and cereals. Usually it's due to equipment size restrictions (mash tun or boil kettle too small) that brewers result to adding extracts to obtain their target OG gravity.

You could use Pilsen malt, if you want to brew now, or wait for 2-row to arrive.
There's a difference in flavor (and color) between the two, but you may not be able to tell the difference in an IPA, due to the abundance of hops, overshadowing more subtle malt flavor differences. Either should work. But most of us will prefer using standard 2-row or Pale malt.

The 90 minute boil for Pilsner malts is to boil off enough DMS, as it contains more than 2-row/ale malt, which is kilned longer after malting. There are certain ways to boil Pilsner malt based worts for only 60' and still drive off enough DMS, but you have to stay with it as it requires certain hands-on interactions at certain times.

If do use the Pilsner malt and a 90' boil, just stick to your regular hop schedule. Remember, all hop additions are timed back from flameout (0 minutes). So if you have a 60' bittering hop, add it 60' from flameout, which is 30' after the 90-minute boil has started, etc. ;)
 
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
Thank you so much again, I'm learning a lot from each of your replies.
You could use Pilsen malt, if you want to brew now, or wait for 2-row to arrive.
There's a difference in flavor (and color) between the two, but you may not be able to tell the difference in an IPA, due to the abundance of hops, overshadowing more subtle malt flavor differences. Either should work. But most of us will prefer using standard 2-row or Pale malt.
I would have to go pick up either way, so I would go with your preference and order the 2-Row. Based on the brewer's friend sheet it gives me an OG of 1.063, which I think is ok? The Morey scale is a little off though, is that fine (Acceptable) or should I increase the honey malt (Heard it would make it sweeter though)?


If do use the Pilsner malt and a 90' boil, just stick to your regular hop schedule. Remember, all hop additions are timed back from flameout (0 minutes). So if you have a 60' bittering hop, add it 60' from flameout, which is 30' after the 90-minute boil has started, etc. ;)
Got it! That makes sense, thank you
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
You can easily up the Honey Malt to 8-10 oz.

Regarding color, let it ride with your ingredients, you can't taste color all that well anyway.

How are you chilling? If it's slow, you may pick up quite a few extra IBUs during the time the wort stays above 170F.

In that case, you can move some of the late (and flameout) hops to a hopstand (or whirlpool).
You'll extract/retain a lot more flavor/aroma from a 20' hopstand at 170F than from the same 5' hops standing in 200-170' for 10' while chilling. A hopstand at lower temps also reduces unwanted bittering effects from slow chilling.

Keep those ideas in mind for your late hop additions. You really don't want much more than 50-60 IBUs in that beer.

Where's the mango coming in?
 
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
How are you chilling? If it's slow, you may pick up quite a few extra IBUs during the time the wort stays above 170F.
I will be using the wort chiller that comes with the foundry. We are in Texas so planning to pass the tap water into an ice bath before passing it into the chiller.

In that case, you can move some of the late (and flameout) hops to a hopstand (or whirlpool).
You'll extract/retain a lot more flavor/aroma from a 20' hopstand at 170F than from the same 5' hops standing in 200-170' for 10' while chilling. A hopstand at lower temps also reduces unwanted bittering effects from slow chilling.
So if I understand it right? I chill the wort to 170 and then add the late additions for 20 minutes and then cool further for pitching?


Where's the mango coming in?
I am planning to add the Mango once the fermentation slows down a bit? in around a week.

Thank you 🙏🏽
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
So if I understand it right? I chill the wort to 170 and then add the late additions for 20 minutes and then cool further for pitching?
That's essentially a hopstand. I'm not suggesting to move all your late (boil) hops to a hopstand/whirlpool, but moving some could work in your favor for more flavor and aroma over more bitterness. Because the hops are being steeped at the lower wort temp, extended time is appropriate to give them time to extract the most flavor/aroma.

If you do that, just turn of the chilling water and stir the wort every 3-5 minutes or so. Then continue chilling down to ferm temps.

Just use your tap water as is, without prechilling, to get the wort temp down as far as it will go, then start prechilling. IOW, use the ice for where it counts most, to get those last 40-80 degrees down.
 
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
Thank you IslandLizard,
I finally did it 😀
Did it before receiving your reply though so went with my older plan of hop additions. The yeast already are working hard and hopefully turn out well. You helped me a lot in this journey and thank you so much for that! If it turns out good, I would love to send some to you! Got only 65% brew house eff though 😬
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
Glad you got that brew done, you made beer!

Although mashing and boiling are essential parts of the brewing process, yeast and fermentation temp control can be even more important to the quality of the resulting beer.

Got only 65% brew house eff though
Probably the crush being overly coarse. Get it milled twice or get your own mill. That way you can buy base malt by the bag sack too, recovering your mill investment in a few years or less. Look around for what a good grain crush for your system should look like.

There may be also a significant dead space underneath the basket, that should be drained completely, or a lot of good high gravity wort remains behind. I'm not familiar with the Foundry, but there must be some good info around, to use to your advantage.

Remember, your Foundry, as most "urn" type brew kettles, is a BIABasket system, relying on full volume mashes with no sparging or just only a little. In sharp contrast to fly sparge and batch sparge systems, where often half the brew water is used for sparging.

80% or even higher mash efficiency should be very attainable with your system.
 
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
Although mashing and boiling are essential parts of the brewing process, yeast and fermentation temp control can be even more important to the quality of the resulting beer.
Thank you, I split it into 3
3 gallons in an bucket with a tee shirt on - Around 70F.
2, 1 Gallon glass jars sitting in my wine cooler at 60F.

Probably the crush being overly coarse. Get it milled twice or get your own mill. That way you can buy base malt by the bag too, recovering your mill investment in a few years or less. Look around for what a good grain crush for your system should look like.
I was thinking about it too and have decided to go with Monster mill 2 roll mill (Mainly because someone by my house is selling it)

There may also a significant dead space underneath the basket, that should be drained completely, or a lot of good high gravity wort remains behind. I'm not familiar with the Foundry, but there must be some good info around, to use to your advantage.
This is interesting, thank you! I shall look into it.

Remember, your Foundry, as most "urn" type brew kettles, is a BIABasket system, relying on full volume mashes with no sparging or just only a little. In sharp contrast to fly sparge and batch sparge systems, where often half the brew water is used for sparging.
Ah ok, I used 1 Gallon more than what Anvil recommended for a 5 Gallon batch as I was going to do a 6 Gallon batch and used 1Gallon of 170F water for Sparging. I could only get 5G out to the fermenter though.
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
Thank you, I split it into 3
3 gallons in an bucket with a tee shirt on - Around 70F.
2, 1 Gallon glass jars sitting in my wine cooler at 60F.
Depending on your yeast, 64-70F is good, but 60F is definitely too cold for most ale yeasts. Staying on the low end of a yeast strain's indicated temp range is usually recommended. Then ramp it up a few degrees when it's almost completed (fermentation slowing down or gravity reading) so it keeps going to finish out.

I was thinking about it too and have decided to go with Monster mill 2 roll mill (Mainly because someone by my house is selling it)
Good choice, and what a perfect opportunity! I have an MM2 also. ;)

Ah ok, I used 1 Gallon more than what Anvil recommended for a 5 Gallon batch as I was going to do a 6 Gallon batch and used 1Gallon of 170F water for Sparging. I could only get 5G out to the fermenter though.
There's always boil off, evaporation. A gallon boil off per hour is very average for 5-6 gallon batches, but it could easily be more. You don't need a wild rolling boil, a mere simmer (surface rippling) is plenty, and often preferred. As long as you boil off a gallon or so per hour (in a 5-6 gallon batch), you're boiling fine. Those are not losses, you're simply concentrating the wort: Gravity <> Volume.

A much higher OG (gravity at the end of the boil) can be an indication of excessive boil off, but you can simply add a measured amount of water to bring it down to the intended OG. Then next time use more water in the sparge, or reduce the boil strength somewhat.

But depending on how well you can recover/strain the wort from the trub, any wort left behind in the kettle is a loss. Each system, brew method, and preference of how much trub to transfer, has those kind of variables. You'll "dial it in" over the first few brews. But analyze your system and reduce losses where you can is good practice, IMO.
 
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
Depending on your yeast, 64-70F is good, but 60F is definitely too cold for most ale yeasts. Staying on the low end of a yeast strain's indicated temp range is usually recommended. Then ramp it up a few degrees when it's almost completed (fermentation slowing down or gravity reading) so it keeps going to finish out.
Ah ok I used Safale US-05 and the ideal suggested temperature was from 59F so I assumed 60F would be ok, It still is fermenting though. Do you think it would be ok?

Good choice, and what a perfect opportunity! I have an MM2 also. ;)
Yeah, I got lucky! I almost ordered a new one when I found the posting. It looks almost new and I can't wait to try it.

There's always boil off, evaporation. A gallon boil off per hour is very average for 5-6 gallon batches, but it could easily be more. You don't need a wild rolling boil, a mere simmer (surface rippling) is plenty, and often preferred. As long as you boil off a gallon or so per hour (in a 5-6 gallon batch), you're boiling fine. Those are not losses, you're simply concentrating the wort: Gravity <> Volume.

A much higher OG (gravity at the end of the boil) can be an indication of excessive boil off, but you can simply add a measured amount of water to bring it down to the intended OG. Then next time use more water in the sparge, or reduce the boil strength somewhat.
Yeah makes sense, I used brew father to calculate everything and I think I should have used their water recommendation as well. I used the anvil's recommendation which was lower.

But depending on how well you can recover/strain the wort from the trub, any wort left behind in the kettle is a loss. Each system, brew method, and preference of how much trub to transfer, has those kind of variables. You'll "dial it in" over the first few brews. But analyze your system and reduce losses where you can is good practice, IMO.
I would have to look into this more to see how to extract the wart from the turn. Hopefully there is a way in these systems.

I am planning to add mangoes to the 3 gallon, and for the other 2, 1 gallon batches I thought I would have one plain and maybe add pineapple to one. What do you think?

Also I am going to get a Spike CF5 for the next batch and still debating about what style I should make. any suggestions?
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
Ah ok I used Safale US-05 and the ideal suggested temperature was from 59F so I assumed 60F would be ok, It still is fermenting though. Do you think it would be ok?
I know their information has changed over time, and is still a jumble. But where did you get 59F from?
From Fermentis:
Fermentation temperature: Ideally at 18-28°C (64-82°F)

Now at the high end of that range we should have our doubts, of course. The yeast may work well at 82F, but what kind of beer would that make? Rocket Fuel! Or are they aiming at distillers?
 
OP
S

Sajjeev

Active Member
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
40
Reaction score
9
Oh wow! That is different. Their package said that, I have attached an image I pulled from Austin brewers website but the packet I had, had similar numbers.
I hear the higher temperatures would give a fruity flavor, what is the disadvantage of being too low?
 

Attachments

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
15,325
Reaction score
5,840
Location
Pasadena, MD
Oh wow! That is different. Their package said that, I have attached an image I pulled from Austin brewers website but the packet I had, had similar numbers.
I hear the higher temperatures would give a fruity flavor, what is the disadvantage of being too low?
The "ideal range" listed on that package indeed starts at 15C (59F). Their information has been changing lately, hopefully due to research and perhaps reformulations of their products. The whole movement toward pitching dry over rehydration fits their E2U (Easy to Use) campaign. Lower ferm temps are harder to achieve, especially for beginners, so that does not make it easier.

Low(er) temps generally slow down (bio)chemical processes including fermentation, so it will take longer to ferment out, but should potentially yield cleaner tasting beer, due to more restrained formation of esters and other byproducts.

Many have reported US-05 becoming "peachy" tasting when fermenting below 64F (18C). That may or may not be desirable, depending on the beer you're brewing. But may not be traceable in more heavily hopped beer such as Pale Ales and IPAs.

Many (smaller) craft breweries use US-05, so product quality, consistency, and predictability are definitely important factors.
 
Top