Malt substitution

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bo.dalenius

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Hi folks, I have gathered a few different recipes over the time that I frequently brew. Mostly different kinds of IPA and some Porter or other ales. My problem is that I ended up using too many different malts that are also hard to get here in Portugal. So I wish to reduce the number of different kinds. I understand that some changes will take place but I think it will be minor and easy to accept. So except from different base malt, I use today:
  • Chit Barley Flakes
  • Chit Wheat Flakes
  • Flaked Torrefied Oats
  • Naked Oats
  • Torrefied Wheat
So, If you would reduce this list to 2-3 different malts, which would you choose and which should be substituted by what?

Thanks and Cheers! - Bo
 

AlexKay

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All of those will add beta glucans and thus body; you could swap any one of them in and probably not notice a difference. I'd go with the flaked wheat, which will also help with head formation and retention.
 

IslandLizard

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  • Chit Barley Flakes
  • Chit Wheat Flakes
I doubt chit malt is suitable as a base malt. It's barely malted (modified) to have enough diastatic power to convert starches into sugars. It can be rich in beta amylase, but alpha amylase (the workhorse enzyme) content is low.

Then the flaking process, using steam and hot rollers, may kill most of the little diastatic power it had. Most chit malt specs spell out to use a maximum of 15% in the grist. It also tastes quite "green" or raw.

  • Flaked Torrefied Oats
  • Naked Oats
  • Torrefied Wheat
None of those have diastatic power.
"Torrefying" is puffing whole grain kernels under high heat, such as puffed corn (pop corn), puffed wheat, etc.

Golden Naked Oats are a type of crystal malt, and quite unique in flavor and aroma. Use up to 10%, maybe 15% in your grist.

Your solution to save money maybe by using 40-50% base malt, and the rest (cheaper) adjuncts.
You can also malt grain yourself.
 
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bo.dalenius

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All of those will add beta glucans and thus body; you could swap any one of them in and probably not notice a difference. I'd go with the flaked wheat, which will also help with head formation and retention.
That was also my belief! But now we are two so now it is a fact! ;) Thanks!
 
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bo.dalenius

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I doubt chit malt is suitable as a base malt. It's barely malted (modified) to have enough diastatic power to convert starches into sugars. It can be rich in beta amylase, but alpha amylase (the workhorse enzyme) content is low.

Then the flaking process, using steam and hot rollers, may kill most of the little diastatic power it had. Most chit malt specs spell out to use a maximum of 15% in the grist. It also tastes quite "green" or raw.


None of those have diastatic power.
"Torrefying" is puffing whole grain kernels under high heat, such as puffed corn (pop corn), puffed wheat, etc.

Golden Naked Oats are a type of crystal malt, and quite unique in flavor and aroma. Use up to 10%, maybe 15% in your grist.

Your solution to save money maybe by using 40-50% base malt, and the rest (cheaper) adjuncts.
You can also malt grain yourself.
Thanks for your answer but I'm not sure that I understand it fully. I don't use any of these malts as base malts. The most complex recipe I brew looks like this:

1663685858027.png
 

hottpeper13

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I like flaked barley in my low gravity stouts. If you don't make wit beers I would ditch the rest and get oat malt and rye malt instead. both are self converting and oat malt makes a hell of a filter bed. For me the rye gives it more slickness then spice and can't taste it under 5%
 

IslandLizard

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Thanks for your answer but I'm not sure that I understand it fully. I don't use any of these malts as base malts. The most complex recipe I brew looks like this:

View attachment 781451
Sorry, I totally read your OP the wrong way. I didn't realize you were listing your (non-diastatic) adjunct choices, in addition to using a regular base malt. :bott:
 

AlexKay

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Thanks for your answer but I'm not sure that I understand it fully. I don't use any of these malts as base malts. The most complex recipe I brew looks like this:

View attachment 781451
My guess is you'd get almost exactly the same thing from 5.5 kg pale ale, 2 kg flaked wheat, and 0.5 kg naked oats.
 
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