Making clear IPA again

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InspectorJon

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Let's see if there is really a significant interest interest in pursuing this as a serious subject or just a lot of folks that want to rant. I'll start by saying I really like the better examples of "NEIPA" and understand haze as a reault of process and not as a goal. I also like the idea of calling it New England Ale and not IPA but I think that ship has sailed. I have seen some IPA's recently at local breweries that were classified as West Coast IPA that were not opaque like many of the NEIPAs on the market but they were not really clear either. We have all heard or read the debate on hazy vs. clear IPA. There is a 40 page thread on that. Let's not debate it here.

Rather than discussing or debating the subject of hazy vs. clear I would like this discussion to be about actual how to and methods of creating a really flavorful clear IPA. Not simply a high IBU IPA which seemed to be a goal a while back but a truly flavorful one. A discussion about grain bill and hop schedules that will combine to focus on both clarity and flavor. Pictures of clear IPA are nice but lets talk about how you got there.

What can be done to make a truly clear IPA that has well defined, standout modern hop flavor and aroma? Is it possible? Personally I care more about flavor than aroma but as one that loves to cook I know smell and taste are closely intertwined. In this article Scott Janish digs into this idea of what creates and what might mitigate haze. Highly flocculant yeast is likely necessary to make clear beer but won't eliminate haze. Haze in good NEIPA is not a resut of yeast in suspension. Polyphenols from hops and protein from malt combining to remain in suspension seem to be prime suspects for haze. Can we minimize polyphenols and protein and still get big hop flavor? I am still what I think of as an intermediate beginning brewer so I am clearly not an expert in the subject matter at hand but it is something I'd like to know more about and pursue.

This is an almost? clear West Coast IPA with Citra, Amarillo and Sabro hops. I thought it was pretty good.
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bwible

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When this thread originally started, it was ranting for a bit. Not because people think NEIPA doesn’t have a place. But because it has taken over the IPA marketplace and many examples are not labelled accurately. That and servers in bars seem confused when somebody asks for a clear ipa - like they’ve never heard of such a thing.

Everybody has their own thing. I don’t care for NEIPA. So I just don’t buy them. I also don’t care for the vanilla bourbon chocolate chicken chipotle porter kind of beers either. But if somebody wants to make that and drink that, well that’s up to them.

But I think the original complaint was that it’s getting harder and harder to find a clear west coast ipa and even when people are trying to buy one they are ending up with murk because the beer is not labelled in a way to tell you what was in the bottle, or more frequently now, the can - where you can’t even look at the beer.

No doubt the dank, juice and murk are here to stay. I don’t believe anybody has a problem with that. If you don’t like what’s on tv you change the channel. All people are asking is that somebody still make a clear ipa - Lagunitas, for example makes a good one - and put the right label on the beer so people know what they are buying. These things all have silly, whimsical names and designs that tell you nothing and no indication what you’re buying other than “IPA”.
 

The_CuRe

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For me, the debate is around IPAS being dry, bitter beers vs non dry, non bitter beers, thats why I refuse to include NEIPAS into IPA category (I know I am not authority for that, just a matter of believes), I do believe there can be hazy IPAS, as long as they keep those two minimum characteristics listed before.
 

PianoMan

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I just like good beer. I've had awful crystal clear WCIPAs and fantastic hazies. Ergo, I don't get my panties in wad just because an ipa isn't clear. I'm usually one and done with a orange vanilla milkshake ipa, for sure, but when done properly, I'm amazed brewer's can pull it off. Just focusing on one look or style takes away from the creativeness and artistry of the craft beer brewing. Just my 2 cents.... let's get back to pics!
 
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InspectorJon

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Rather than discussing or debating the subject of hazy vs. clear I would like this thread to be about actual how to and methods of creating a really flavorful clear IPA. Not simply high IBU IPA which seemed to be a goal a while back but truly flavorful. A discussion about grain bill and hop schedules that will combine to focus on both clarity and flavor. Pictures of clear IPA are nice but lets talk about how you got there.

Maybe this discussion should be moved to All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing
 
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PianoMan

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Rather than discussing or debating the subject of hazy vs. clear I would like this thread to be about actual how to and methods of creating a really flavorful clear IPA. Not simply high IBU IPA which seemed to be a goal a while back but truly flavorful. A discussion about grain bill and hop schedules that will combine to focus on both clarity and flavor. Pictures of clear IPA are nice but lets talk about how you got there.

Maybe this discussion should be moved to All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing
I can explain some history. I originally got into home brewing for WCDIPAs and RISs. Over time, I become a Safale05 only guy using basically a Pliny the Elder grain bill and hop schedule and of course changed up hops over time as they developed other strains. I bottled at the time and dry hopped in a secondary bucket. 17days primary, 10days secondary. Truly, even then, beers came out great. But the flavor didn't last long due to O2 introduction. Then the hazies came out. I tried cloning them using different yeast, higher Alpha hops, reading about 7day fermentation and it all went to sh!t for me. Nothing came out good. So basically, I'm returning to my original brewing concept with some modifications.

Concepts: use exact same grain bill, chemistry, 2pks of 05, 12.5oz hops using a .5/3/3/3/3 schedule (.5 bittering at 30min/3oz at 0min/3oz whirlpool/3oz dryhop 1 after day 3 fermentation/3oz 2nd dryhop). So the 2nd "dryhop" is warming some DI water to 80-90F then with a strainer add the 3oz hops and soak for 10min or so then add the hoptea to the keg while filling. Keg is purging with CO2 the entire time to minimize oxygen obviously. Fermentation was 14days then keg. This next one fermenting now will be 14days then cold crash for 48hrs at 55F. I was impatient with the 1st attempt...even as a veteran HB, I still get excited! Other things I add to the keg is potassium sorbate (to help ensure no refermentation) and absorbic acid for oxygen control.

The above beer was the 1st attempt at this and came out great. I used Magnum, Falconers Flight and Citra. My IPA loving friends were jazzed with the results. No diacetyl, no harsh hop burn, just a good clean flavorful beer. Maybe a hair sweet due to honey malt but will back off 1oz.

In this next IPA, I'm using hops used in Pinthouse Pizza Electric Jellyfish but still 05 and same hop schedule.

Grain Bill:
10lbs - 2 row
4lbs. - White wheat
12oz - Carapils
4oz - Crystal 20 (Axed out of the recipe now)
4oz - Honey Malt (will use 3oz next time)
1lbs - Corn sugar
End ABV around 7.7% but will be a bit lower after adding the hop tea mix.
 
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ba-brewer

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I believe the OP is looking for help in making a clear IPA with the flavor and aroma character of an NEIPA.

I would say the IPA shown in the OP is an acceptable level of haze for a West Coast IPA.
 
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InspectorJon

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What's the point of this thread vs. the other thread?
Rather than discuss the distinctions of labeling hazy or clear IPA or what ever one prefers to call it, I would like to discuss how to make clear IPA using the newer hops and research that NEIPA has spawned. How can we put that new knowledge about hops and grain into use but still produce a clear beer? Lets see if we can't produce a tropical, fruity highly flavorful clear IPA that isn't a race to 100 IBUs.
 
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InspectorJon

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I become a Safale05 only guy using basically a Pliny the Elder grain bill and hop schedule and of course changed up hops over time as they developed other strains.
I have used a grain bill I found in the Two Hearted Clone thread a lot to make IPA experimenting with different hops. I think this version was a 3 gallon batch. The percentages are whats relevant. The last two could be equaled at 4% each.
5.5 LB two row (75%)
20 oz Vienna (17%)
6 oz Crystal 15-20 (5%)
4 oz Carapils (3%)

The Janish article says:
"A study looking at the haze of beer brewed from a control of 100% malted barley compared to two beers with either 20% and 40% of the malted barley was replaced with unmalted wheat found that the higher the addition of unmalted wheat, the less permanent haze. The beer with 40% unmalted wheat had significantly less permanent haze than the beer with 100% barley. The authors also tested a number of polyphenols in the beer and found that the higher the percentage of unmalted wheat in the beer, the less amount of measured polyphenols were in the beer."
And:
"If haze increases as the polyphenols from dry hopping increases, it should be then that two beers made exactly the same, except for different dry hopping regimes (one with more hop material and the other with less) should have a noticeably different appearance."

Given this I think I will substitute some unmalted wheat for part of the two row, which should help counteract the heavier dry hop tendency to create permanent haze. @PianoMan Using the hop tea idea seems like it might also help by minimizing hop material. Using oxygen at packaging won't do anything for haze reduction but will certainly result in an improved.

I like some of the fruity esters the popular NEIPA yeasts produce. I have a current batch of the above grain bill fermenting with Juice A38. It has a water profile more like a NEIPA but dryhopping at a little under 1 oz/gallon. I'm hoping it will come out more clear than hazy.
 
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I am up for this, i would love to see some peoples ideas here. probably 8 or so months ago i brewed an ipa, didnt label it as anything in particular. i wanted an ipa that was clear but using the newer hops to get that tropical fruity flavor. i went with a simple grain bill 93% 2row 7% crystal 20. used what i had on hand for hops so 60min boil of 20oz each centennial and magnum, 1oz of mosaic at 20min 10min and flame out. dry hopped with 2oz of galaxy. the result was not crystal clear, not hazy, an ok ipa but i felt was under hopped. i have not revisited this recipe yet but coming up on spring i would to produce a better final product. hopefully this thread will return some better results then mine. not that it was bad, it was a perfectly drinkable beer but tasted more of an apa the ipa. so i would likely brew a similar batch and put some more emphasis on the late boil additions and maybe do a whirlpool hop then double my dry hop.
 

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for me, as long as the IBU's are where you want them to be, it's all about time and limiting oxygen exposure. If you want a nice clear, bitter, yet resiny hop flavor, the way I get there is with time, mostly.

Brew day is as usual for any other beer but I put some extra effort into getting clear wort into the fermenter. Do whatever whirlpool and dry hops the recipe says, then cold crash for a few days, then package. I used to skip the dryhop and just put hops in the keg but it seemed like all the hops would be gone after the first 6 pours and those 6 pours were very cloudy and just tasted like straight up hops. So now I dry hop for 7-14 days then remove them before I cold crash and the result is much better with the hop flavor surviving throughout the life of the keg. I let the keg condition for 2-3 weeks before I tap it to enjoy. I usually get relatively clear beer while maintaining that hoppy flavor and mouthfeel.
 

PianoMan

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Just to add more about flavor. These are pictures of the hop schedule for the current #1 try...they were on-hand hops so guess I added Simcoe also.

The #2 hop schedule is the currently fermenting one. One thing I didn't note earlier, I do Magnum as a first-wort not a boil hop. Supposably it squeezes out a few more IBUs. One 1oz package lasts 2 beers.

The 3rd pic are all the various hop schedules I've picked up over time but mostly from a thread on HBT... I'll post here once I find it.

Hop schedules...



PXL_20210114_220816742.jpg


PXL_20210114_220834283.jpg


PXL_20210114_220859335.jpg
 

Immocles

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i see a few of ya mentioning dry hopping for 10-14 days. I’ve never gone over about five for fear of grassiness. Am I scared of nothing? I like to time things out where I’m hopping near the end of fermentation, but there’s been times I’ve been forced to skip it because I won’t get around to bottling for a week or more later.
 

Immocles

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Try reading the Wolfe Thesis from Oregon State University. Talks a ton about dry hopping. Might change your ways....
A quick google brings up some solid reading material. Thank you! I know how I’ll be spending some of my free time later this week.

I’d love to be able to dry hop at the same time and not worry about if I’m able to bottle in the next 3-5 days.
 

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I'm watching this thread as I too am intrigued by this as well. I do LOVE neipas though. I think this is relevant here but @Loud Brewing (I haven't seen him around here on HBT for a while though) posted these two posts back to back on the Northeast IPA thread which might be helpful. Its interesting to note that he thought the WCIPA movement has been changing from the 1000IBU party it used to be to now somewhere in the middle of WCIPA vs NEIPA. But the "modern" WCIPA is still clear but more flavorful and not as IBU forward as it used to be. His post shows a super clear IPA.

 

Immocles

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7B47F36C-D5F8-4A58-A993-3EBF30168C45.jpeg

Fwiw, I can get a clear beer, but I’m not excited about the flavor and aroma. It’s extremely drinkable, and my various renditions have gotten good reviews, but I’m my own worst critic and know I can get better results. Maybe I’m doomed being a bottler, which is why I’m kinda anxious about hitting my DH timing. I’m not a huge fan of 05 and generally use notty, but have a few other dry options to test out in coming months. Anyone have other suggestions?

I'm watching this thread as I too am intrigued by this as well. I do LOVE neipas though. I think this is relevant here but @Loud Brewing (I haven't seen him around here on HBT for a while though) posted these two posts back to back on the Northeast IPA thread which might be helpful. Its interesting to note that he thought the WCIPA movement has been changing from the 1000IBU party it used to be to now somewhere in the middle of WCIPA vs NEIPA. But the "modern" WCIPA is still clear but more flavorful and not as IBU forward as it used to be. His post shows a super clear IPA.

100ibu seems nuts to me, But I’ve seen it. I’d agree that the wcipa has gotten a bit tamer in recent years. Maybe I’m just shooting too low (~55-60ibu)on hops, or the wrong combo to get what I’m looking for.
 
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@Noob_Brewer i recall reading his (loud brewing) posts in the northeast ipa thread and that was what gave me the initial idea to brew something along theses lines. and what i brewed sounds like i had similar results to @Immocles .. it was a good beer and ppl liked it but to me it didnt have the flavor/aroma i was looking for. i plan to make some adjustments to that batch and try it again in the spring as my next couple brew days are already planned. also that 55-60 ibu range i think is reasonable considering wp and dry hop additions arent gonna take your ibu's through the roof, this is where we need to increase our hop addition amounts and for these additions use hops like strata, galaxy, nelson, VS. and so on.
 

PianoMan

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I'm watching this thread as I too am intrigued by this as well. I do LOVE neipas though. I think this is relevant here but @Loud Brewing (I haven't seen him around here on HBT for a while though) posted these two posts back to back on the Northeast IPA thread which might be helpful. Its interesting to note that he thought the WCIPA movement has been changing from the 1000IBU party it used to be to now somewhere in the middle of WCIPA vs NEIPA. But the "modern" WCIPA is still clear but more flavorful and not as IBU forward as it used to be. His post shows a super clear IPA.

That's how I like IPA in general. Sure the Orange Vanilla Milkshake IPA is interesting, but one and done for me. I use white wheat in ny IPAs because I like mouthfeel to my beers. Even on the WCIPAs I push all the hops forward with only a small 25-35ibu at FirstWort. 0min and whirlpool 3oz hops/each add plenty more bitter with good flavor. Only makes sense to me. Latest WCIPA

PXL_20210118_012952235.MP.jpg
 

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Really glad to see this thread! Here is my take on several aspects of brewing a modern west coast IPA. Not saying any of this is right, its just where my head is currently at, hopefully it can spur some conversation.

Grain: I've been using 80% 2 row, 20% Vienna although I'd like to start using small amounts of crystal malt. My intent has been to really let the hops shine, but sometimes the malt base falls a little flat. I think there is potential to split the base malt between 2 row and MO/GP, there could also be room for wheat and cara-pils.

Hop varieties: Pliny uses CTZ/Centennial/Amarillo/Simcoe. Sticky Hands uses CTZ/Centennial/Amarillo/Citra/Mosaic. I've had the best luck with Simcoe/Centennial/Amarillo and Simcoe/Centennial/Citra. I think less than a third of the hops being really fruity is better, with citrus, pine, dank taking the lead and some tropical fruit support it. I brewed an all Citra west coast IPA and I think it wished it was a NEIPA.

Hop timing:
  • 60 min: majority of IBU's with Warrior
  • 10 min: a few IBU's
  • 0 min: 3 oz
  • whirlpool: 4 oz
  • dry hop: 6-8 oz
Does it make sense to shift more to the hot side?
Soft crash before dry hop?
1 or 2 sets of dry hop?
Are some varieties better in the boil vs. whirlpool vs. dry hop?

Bitterness: IBU's roughly equal original gravity points (e.g. 65 IBU for 1.065).

Yeast: Imperial House (WLP007/WY1098) is my favorite. I really want to like Imperial Flagship (WLP001/WY1056), but it just never comes out as well for me.

Water: I've done 250:50 sulfate:chloride and a target pH of 5.3 my last few brews, hard to know what impact this has with all the other factors.

Process: Limiting oxygen is obviously the big one, I think everything that applies to NEIPA applies to west coast IPA as well.
 

Immocles

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Grain: I've been using 80% 2 row, 20% Vienna although I'd like to start using small amounts of crystal malt. My intent has been to really let the hops shine, but sometimes the malt base falls a little flat. I think there is potential to split the base malt between 2 row and MO/GP, there could also be room for wheat and cara-pils.

Hop varieties: Pliny uses CTZ/Centennial/Amarillo/Simcoe. Sticky Hands uses CTZ/Centennial/Amarillo/Citra/Mosaic. I've had the best luck with Simcoe/Centennial/Amarillo and Simcoe/Centennial/Citra. I think less than a third of the hops being really fruity is better, with citrus, pine, dank taking the lead and some tropical fruit support it. I brewed an all Citra west coast IPA and I think it wished it was a NEIPA.
I've been experimenting with splitting 2 row and GP/MO as well. I find I like my hoppier beers with 60-70% 2 row, a small percentage of white wheat and C40, and the rest with MO/GP. When I next do a higher percentage of MO or GP, I'm going to absolutely hammer the hops at it. Those two malts always overshadow my hopping.
I'm struggling with hop combinations. I agree with your line about your all Citra beer wishing it was an NEIPA. I run into that with mosaic. I love it, but its just not what Im looking for and I need a solid piney hop to pair with it. My ipa brewing is probably taking a bit of a back burner for awhile since I can make lagers for the next few months, but my next IPA brew will be a mix of leftover hops and I'm hoping to stumble onto something.


.5/3/3/3/3 schedule
Interesting!
So for a guy who doesn't keg, and therefore doesn't have a whole lot of oxygen mitigation, would you still do that second dry hop?
 

PianoMan

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Interesting!
So for a guy who doesn't keg, and therefore doesn't have a whole lot of oxygen mitigation, would you still do that second dry hop?

Great question. I think the hop tea thing would work either way. If you bottle from the fermenter I'd just pour slowly to not disturb the trub and then bottle. Guess use your best judgement. I'm an experimentalist so I'd obviously try it
 

Immocles

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Hmm, I do bottle off the fermenter and prime bottles individually. I hadn't considered adding it at that point and hoping for the best. Maybe the next time I brew an IPA, ill make a note to either add it to the fermenter, or do an old school batch prime and rack the beer on top of both the priming solution and a hop tea charge.

I feel like this spring is going to be a hop heavy time of the year for me.
 

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What are the thoughts around fining for
WCIPA? I agree, clear, bitter IPA are great but frankly I love almost all beers.
Does gelatin fining kill hop aroma and flavour? I would assume
That over time in cold storage those hops and yeast in suspension would come out anyways the fining just accelerates it.
I know fining can be viewed as a bit of a cheat code but when I’m going for a nice
Looking clear beer I don’t hesitate to use it. Drinking a German pils right now that no one would know is home brew. Clear as can be. Drink with your eyes is a thing.
 

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I am going back to 60, 30 ,10 min additions. for me it builds out a full flavor of a hop. also not having tons of flameout hops for me keeps the beer clear.
 
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I plan to do a 60, 10, and wp addition. I like what wp additions bring to the table for flavor and aroma, and when i brewed my first attempt last spring it came out semi clear. have to do a hard crash for sure, havent thought about fining but may consider that too. here is what im thinking ...

15 gallon batch

90% 2row
7% honey malt
3% cara pils/dextrine

60min - 3oz simcoe and 3oz chinook
10min - 3oz azzaca, 3oz cascade, 3oz citra
wp 30min - 3oz azzaca, 3oz cascade, 3oz citra
dry hop - 4oz simcoe, 4 oz cascade, 4oz citra

yeast - imperial house or wlp007 as @anteater8 mentioned above

the dry hop will be at 60f for 3 days then cold crash for 3 days.

so this is my starting point, up for suggestions. these are hops and grains that i have on hand, maybe some crystal malt, not a fan of vienna. for the flavor have thought about switching out the cascade for galaxy or idaho7, and for the bitting maybe go all simcoe, early stages here so not dead set on it.
 
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InspectorJon

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I'm bottling this 4 gallon batch of DIPA today. I used both wirlflock hot side fining (1/4 tab for 4.25 gallons) and gelatin after cold crashing. Soft crashed to 50F on day 11 of fermentation to drop the yeast. Raised back up to 60F on day 13 and dry hopped at a rate of .9 oz/gallon. After 3 days dry hop at 60 degrees I cold crashed to 35 for 4 days. It took overnight to get to 35 degrees in my modified dorm fridge. Once it hit 35 I added gelatin. I put the fermenter on the kitchen counter a 70 degrees yesterday and it cleared quite a bit overnight as it warmed up. Not sure what is up with that. Chill Haze?

4 gallons into fermenter:
8 lb - pale 2 row, 68.8%
2 lb - German Vienna, 17.1%
8 oz - Carapils, 4.3%
8 oz - CaraVienna 20L, 4.3% (I wanted 15-20 crystal and this is what the LHBS had)
11.5 oz - Demerara cane sugar, 6.1%

Hops: 76 IBU
30 min - 30g Centennial
10 min - 11g CTZ, 14g Simcoe, 30g Centennial
5 min - 15g Simcoe, 20g Centennial

Whirlpool/steeped hops added at 170 degrees and allowed to cool naturally, stirring occasionally for 20 minutes. - 20g Simcoe, 20g Centennial.

Dry hop 3 days @ 60F - 20g Sabro, 25g Simcoe, 56g Centenial (it's what was left in the bag)

OG: 1.075
FG: 1.019 - 71% AA, typical of A38
 
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InspectorJon

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This is an interesting Brulosophy Exbeeriment regarding a comparison of hop stand/whirlpool only vs. dry hop only hop additions. They got pretty clear beer using 3 oz dry hop in a 5 gallon batch. I think dry hopping and perhaps hop stand hop additions are a primary culprit in creating permanent haze. I wonder what the upper limit is to produce non-bitter flavor while still maintaining potential clarity?

 

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i see a few of you like Imperal house. i am a big fan of PUB and its my go to ale strain any thoughts?
 

Jako

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I have never used it but looks like I'll have to give it a try, sounds like it would be a good one. Haven't seen it at my lhbs so I'll order some
its extremely fast to ferment great flavor and it drops clear with a playdough tight yeast cake. perfect yeast for making fast beer esters are not over the top and i enjoy it to be honest.
 

Brooothru

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i see a few of you like Imperal house. i am a big fan of PUB and its my go to ale strain any thoughts?
IIRC, A09 "Pub" is Windsor. It attenuates well and drops very clear. The yeast cake is very light and fluffy though, and it takes a while for it to clear fully and is easily disturbed, so you'll want to not move your FV until you've racked the beer. I've used a couple of times (a Blonde and an IPA) and was generally pleased with the outcome.

Performance-wise the closest thing I'd compare it to is Wyeast 2105-PC "Rocky Mt. Lager" (Coors house yeast) in that it attenuates well, drops very clear, and leaves a fluffy cake. "Pub", to me, didn't leave many esters, but I ferment most ales in the low 60s F. Warmer temps supposedly will give more traditional British results if that's your target.

Brooo Brother
 
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InspectorJon

InspectorJon

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The yeast cake is very light and fluffy though, and it takes a while for it to clear fully and is easily disturbed
Do you think fining with gelatin would help solidify the yeast cake? Perhaps just the surface which would keep it from being disturbed so easily.
 

Brooothru

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Seems like it should, or at least could. The fluffy nature isn't a big deal, just have your fermenter located where you want to transfer from for "a while" before racking. I ferment in a unitank attached to a glycol tank, so it's basically stationary. But if I take a starter off a stir plate, Pub might take "a while longer" than Chico or other common yeasts. Where I see an issue comes as I rotate the racking arm in the fermenter towards the bottom. It will start sucking up settled yeast if I'm not being careful.
 

Noob_Brewer

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One thing that I haven't seen here being discussed, unless I missed it, is a part of process. Im finding that clear beer into the fermenter is a huge help. This was by "accident" for me, as I finished my brew day once upon a time at 12:30pm but hadn't yet racked to the fermenter when I had to attend to family stuff. Nevertheless, at 5pm I racked it to the fermenter and the beer was VERY clear despite it being an NEIPA with a good bit of wheat and oats. It also allowed me to keep the amount of trub into the fermenter (I let my hops roam free in the kettle) at a minimum. The beer came out great! It was hazy likely due to the hops (moutere and nectaron) but it was a "clean hazy", not murky at all. So Ive adopted this part of my process now and I wait 3-4ish hrs before racking. I have an anvil foundry which is tall and narrow, so I think it takes longer to clear as well, but I always use whirlfloc. Pictured here is a single hopped pale ale with Riwaka. No oats, just 2-row, 1 lb of white wheat, and a little biscuit. Went into the fermenter clear and came out clear. Used US05 for this simple pale ale and only 2oz of riwaka in the DH. Bottom line, waiting a bit before the wort is racked to the fermenter is helpful for clear beer for sure.
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