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Maylar

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My local brew supplies shops don't keep hours that jive with my work schedule. I ordered some stuff from an online supplier, including some Nottingham ale yeast. I had the order shipped Priority and it arrived in 2 days but given the Summer weather I'm concerned about if the shipping temperatures could have affected the yeast.

So, first is there any reason to be worried about this? And second, is there any way to "test" yeast for viability besides throwing into a batch of brew and seeing what happens?

TIA
 

Hello

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Without a microscope I doubt you'll be able to test it. Usually online suppliers will include an ice pack or give you that option for $1.00 more. It doesn't keep incredibly cold if the yeast takes a long journey (say 5 days), but it does help. The best thing you can do is make a starter. You should be doing that with liquid yeast most of the time anyway.

The other thing you can do is research how long it would take to get your package from the supplier. You want to make sure that you order in time so that the package does not sit on a truck over the weekend.
 

Gameface

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If it's liquid yeast then not only is there a way to check viability but by doing this viability test you will probably make a significant step forward in the quality of your beer.

As the previous poster mentioned, you can make a yeast starter. You should pretty much always make a yeast starter with liquid yeast unless you're making no more than 5 gallons of beer with an S.G. in the sub 1.040 range. Making a larger batch, a higher gravity or using older yeast and you SHOULD make a yeast starter. Ignore what the package says, your beer will be better if you pitch an adequate amount of yeast.
 

IslandLizard

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Nottingham is dry yeast. Unlike liquid yeast, dry yeast is very resilient irt temperature ranges and changes. Although I have no evidence, I doubt a few days at 90-some degrees will kill it. That said, I keep dry yeast in my freezer for years, with very little viability change.

Bricks of dry (bakers) yeast are on Sam's Club/Costco shelves for months, unrefrigerated.

Perhaps you could pre-order your supplies and/or yeast from your brewshop and have someone else pick em up for you?
I usually buy all my yeast at my brewshop, unless I need one of those special sours or so, and then, I try to avoid buying them during extreme seasons. The ice packs are a joke. They're melted before the yeast leaves the warehouse and makes it onto the truck. The only thing they do is provide a bit of a heat sink to stabilize the temps somewhat, but still very little. Submerging them in a pound of 2 of grain would be better IMO.
 

kh54s10

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Agreed with dry yeast there is little concern. With liquid yeast, have it shipped with a cold pack. Then make a starter before using. If you buy a Wyeast smack pack the heat may make it swell. That does not mean the yeast is bad. Make the starter and you will know if the yeast is viable.

If you expect a heat wave during the time the shipment will be on the road, either opt for dry yeast or delay your liquid yeast order for cooler weather.
 

Poobah58

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My local brew supplies shops don't keep hours that jive with my work schedule. I ordered some stuff from an online supplier, including some Nottingham ale yeast. I had the order shipped Priority and it arrived in 2 days but given the Summer weather I'm concerned about if the shipping temperatures could have affected the yeast.

So, first is there any reason to be worried about this? And second, is there any way to "test" yeast for viability besides throwing into a batch of brew and seeing what happens?

TIA
All of the "local" shops will ship. Means you get it the next day.
 
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