Made BM's Cenennial Blonde, moved carboy, second krausen 3 days later

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RedIrocZ-28

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Anyone have this happen before? I have seen people claim that after racking to secondary, sometimes a new krausen will form, but this is a new one on me. I simply moved the carboy to a new location, maybe a 1-2* temp difference, maybe, and 3 days later a new krausen forms and it starts chugging away again. Its been probably 3 days and the airlock is still ticking away on the second krausen. No leaky seal here, its glass, and its not an infection.
 

WBC

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You moved it way too soon. Try 2 weeks in the primary sitting still. Then bottle or keg. No need for a secondary with ales.
 

flyangler18

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You moved it way too soon. Try 2 weeks in the primary sitting still. Then bottle keg. No need for a secondary with ales.
Doesn't look like you read his post at all.

To the OP, moving it roused some yeast and got them moving again. How long had it been fermenting in the first location before you moved it?
 

HenryHill

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I read the OP and understand that the beer is still in primary.

A while back I gave a beer a full week at room temp, then moved it to the cold for finishing. After about 3 1/2 weeks, I opened the lid and took a reading-1.030. I swirled the beer, left at room temp, and it started again, finishing like it should have. This was with Nottingham yeast.

I have taken to swirling my primaries every couple days and giving them more time before moving to cold. Maybe it was just that Notty or that batch, but I don't feel that with the CO2 in the pail from fermentation, that lightly swirling the beer can have much of an ill effect on the finished beer, and helps me know that it hasn't stalled.
 
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RedIrocZ-28

RedIrocZ-28

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I'd be worried about swirling my beer that often. Oxygenation is real and it is gross.

By swirling I think he simply means stirring gently. I do this at bottling time and never once have had oxygenation. So long as you don't agitate enough for the beer to cavitate and splash I think you are fine.
 

WBC

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Doesn't look like you read his post at all.

To the OP, moving it roused some yeast and got them moving again. How long had it been fermenting in the first location before you moved it?
I got it, but the point of my post is to let it be! It will be fine!
 

WBC

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I want to say that it was 10 days, and then I moved it. I think this was Nottingham as well. Looks like I'll be going back to Safale 04 and 05.
There is nothing wrong with Nottingham yeast unless it is too old. I ferment at 60F to 62F in a temperature controlled fridge which is very stable temperature and it is always a double batch. I have never had a batch that stops fermenting. I have also been brewing since 1972 so I do have some experience.
 

carnevoodoo

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Or are you saying you just give the fermenter a little swirl without opening it?
The fermenter itself. Once it is bottled, nothing is getting in there. If you mean the bottling bucket, I don't stir there either. Letting the beer siphon into the bucket will mix it properly. Again, I am overcautious. I know it.
 

mahilly

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I have a centennial blonde with Nottingham in the fermenter right now (day 11). It finished fermenting after 3 days. I've tried gently shaking a couple times to see if I can get any more activity, but got none. FG has been at 1011 for almost a week.

While we are on the subject, my OG was 1044 which is much less than 1054 predicted by beersmith (mine is an extract version, not the original recipe). Could my OG really be that far off from beersmith, or is it more likely that my hydrometer reading was bad? I mixed it really well before sampling.
 
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RedIrocZ-28

RedIrocZ-28

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WBC, there actually was and still is an issue with Nottingham yeast. Its been confirmed by several brewers here, I was also one of the naysayers, until Monday. I also never had a problem with Notty. Its what I always use. But, again, numerous people have reported that Notty is not attenuating properly. I WISH I had a hydrometer reading before the 2nd krausen formed because its interesting that simply picking up the fermenter turning 90*, and setting it down again was enough to rouse the yeast and have them go for a 2nd yeast orgy. Granted it was not as strong as the first "primary fermentation activity" but none the less, there was a thin tan krausen that formed for a few days that gave way to bubbles covering the surface, and finally as of last night it dropped.
 
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