Lucky 13 Dark Mild: Learn to Brew Day

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gencinjay

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I'm thinking about giving this a go on November 6th. Here is their partial mash recipe:
  • 12oz Biscuit Malt (recommended: Dingemans)
  • 8oz Chocolate Malt (recommended: Dingemans)
  • 4oz Special B (recommended: Dingemans)
  • 6lbs Golden Light dry malt extract (recommended: Briess)
I want to do all-grain still. I'm thinking of substituting Golden Promise for the DME. What do you think?
 

IslandLizard

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Here is their partial mash recipe:
That's a recipe of an extract batch with steeping grains, not a partial mash, because there is no diastatic malt included, such as Golden Promise, 2-row, etc.

Have you done all-grain before?
If you have the equipment (and size!) to do an all-grain batch, yes, substitute Golden Promise for all the extract. You'd need to use enough Golden Promise to get the recipe's OG. Use a recipe formulator to estimate what's needed. Brewer's Friend is free, there are others.
 
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I want to do all-grain still. I'm thinking of substituting Golden Promise for the DME. What do you think?
IMO, it would be an enjoyable beer (I've brewed a couple of times with Golden Promise). Maris Otter or a Pale Ale (vs "brewers malt") would also be flavorful choices. If I were brewing this recipe "all grain", I would start with something other than a basic 2-row "brewers malt".

As an aside: A number of years ago, there was a "Briess blog" article that stated the base malt for their "Golden Light" DME/LME. The article is no longer at the web site, but was available in the "internet archives". If you are interested, I can check for the link.

eta: Briess makes a "Pale Ale" DME which may be an interesting alternative to "Golden Light" DME. Pale Ale DME is "100% Pale Ale Malt" (check the product information sheet) - definitely not a basic 2-row brewers malt.
 
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gencinjay

gencinjay

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Yes. I've been doing all-grain which is why I don't want to do this DME recipe. I have both Golden Promis and 2 Row that I could use but was thinking Golden Promise might be better for the style.
 

IslandLizard

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I have both Golden Promis and 2 Row that I could use but was thinking Golden Promise might be better for the style.
Either Golden Promise (GP) or Maris Otter (MO) would be suitable for a Dark Mild. There are other suitable malts, the UK has much more grain variety than we do in the US/Canada. For example I've used Optic.

If you want to use the same recipe, just substitute 5-6 pounds of GP for the DME (amount depending on your BH efficiency).
BTW, the 6# of DME in the quoted recipe above is far too much for Milds, the style having a target OG of 1.030-1.038, not 1.050+.
  • 5 - 6 lbs Golden Promise (depending on your BH efficiency)
  • 12 oz Biscuit Malt *
  • 8 oz Chocolate Malt
  • 4 oz Special B **
* You may want to cut down on the Biscuit malt, if using any, as GP has a nice bready flavor already. Let her shine!
** Doesn't belong in a Mild, but may add something interesting.

The recipe really needs some (12-16 oz) Crystal malt, either medium, dark or a mixture of both. UK varieties recommended, they taste better in a beer like this.
 
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might as well use UK malt.
Agreed.

Note that the recipe is one of two for AHA's "Learn to Homebrew Day (link) " : Lucky 13 Dark Mild (link)

Direct quote from the recipe page:
A well-known beer style throughout history sometimes called an ‘English mild,’ the Dark Mild is typically low in alcohol while still medium-bodied due to increased dextrin malts. Expect roasty nuttiness with slight toffee notes perfect for the colder months. This recipe is a ripe example of the difference specialty malts can make.
The recipe contributor has a podcast which may offer additional insights into this 'interpretation' of a dark mild.
 
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