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Pyg

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I started a extract cream ale kit.
Boiled 2.5 gallon of water. Added the DME and cooked for 60min
LME was added at 15min and the other 1/2 at flameout
Cooled to about 75f and added water to reach 5 gallons.
Took my Sg and it hovered at 1.042.
I stirred the wort and let it settle and took another reading 1.042
The direction indicates that the SG could be between 1.042 & 1.056.
What I don't understand is what occurs during the boil and cooling that could cause such a difference in Sg.
I know in my wine making a cup of sugar would move up the Sg by a specific amount.
View attachment ImageUploadedByHome Brew1424661375.359324.jpg

Is it possible to boil some sugar out of the wort?

Does the cooking process play a roll (it took me longer than anticipated to cool due to a shortage of ice)?
 

flars

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According to the fermentables in the recipe, 1.042 would be the correct SG. Thirty-six points per gallon for the LME and 44 points per gallon for DME.

Was there an option to go with one gallon less in the fermentor resulting in a higher SG??
 
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Pyg

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According to the fermentables in the recipe, 1.042 would be the correct SG. Thirty-six points per gallon for the LME and 44 points per gallon for DME.

Was there an option to go with one gallon less in the fermentor resulting in a higher SG??
I guess I could have gone with one less gallon, but by the time I took my SG, I had topped up to 5 gallon.

I guess I should have gone with my gut and added some crushed corn, however I was trying this recipe "as is" to see if I liked it. I always skeptical of the LHBS that sold it too me, because the person who prepares it can make mistakes.
I just dont understand that if the SG if based on the Fermentables, how could they conceive of a range of 1.042 to 1.056?

I just have to hope that the FG is 1.005 so I can atleast reach 4.2%

Part of me wanted to check the SG to see if it raised as everything settled together, but I dont want to disturb the must and risk oxidizing.
 

flars

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The SG range they have in the recipe sheet may be based on the SG range for the style of the beer, not based on the fermentables included in the package you received. Dumb way of showing a recipe if that is the reason for the range printed.
 
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Pyg

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Is it too late for me to add some priming sugar in an attempt to up the SG a bit?

Or do I risk oxidation by opening the lid?
If not how much would I add to get to 5%, without having to fuss around with a hydrometer?
 

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You can still add sugar, and that might even work better. I'm about to try that with a beer I'm making now. I plan to boil, cool, and add 1 lb of cane sugar to a 2.5 gallon batch once primary fermentation has slowed.

If you add it at this point oxidation shouldn't be an issue since the yeast is still producing plenty of CO2.

The reasoning here being that if you were to add the sugar to the boil or before primary fermentation the yeast will go for the more easily fermentable sugars from the cane sugar first, possibly resulting in a stuck fermentation or higher than desired FG. So adding it later during fermentation ensures that the yeast have already gotten through most of the maltose, and also at that point the yeast will have multiplied and mean you won't have to worry about under pitching for the added gravity points added by the sugar.

That's my understanding anyway.
 
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flars

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Is it too late for me to add some priming sugar in an attempt to up the SG a bit?

Or do I risk oxidation by opening the lid?
If not how much would I add to get to 5%, without having to fuss around with a hydrometer?
Adding sugar to boost the ABV will give yo a thin, dry, and possibly cidery tasting beer. Adding LME or DME will give you the taste the recipe is supposed to have.

Opening the bucket will not risk oxidation.

Adding it now depends upon how long active fermentation has been going. Adding fermentables to an active fermentation will not be a problem. Adding to a finished fermentation would require resuspending the yeast.

Adding one pound of DME or sugar will add 0.008 to your original SG. Adding one pound of LME will add 0.007 to the SG. The LME or DME would need to be dissolved in boiling water, same as a sugar addition.
 
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Pyg

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Adding sugar to boost the ABV will give yo a thin, dry, and possibly cidery tasting beer. Adding LME or DME will give you the taste the recipe is supposed to have.

Opening the bucket will not risk oxidation.

Adding it now depends upon how long active fermentation has been going. Adding fermentables to an active fermentation will not be a problem. Adding to a finished fermentation would require resuspending the yeast.

Adding one pound of DME or sugar will add 0.008 to your original SG. Adding one pound of LME will add 0.007 to the SG. The LME or DME would need to be dissolved in boiling water, same as a sugar addition.
Thanks for info, it has been super helpful.
However I am on the fence as to adding DME. I would have to stop at LHBS and buy some as I have none sitting around the house.
I Pitched the yeast last night and hopefully it will be bubbling away when I get home.
If the must ferments from 1.042 to 1.005 as I hope it will, it will be roughly 5%,
Then again if it does not I am a bit of trouble.
My fear is that by tweeking the recipe I could potentially screw up the entire thing.

How much water do I boil the extra DME?
 

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I guess I should have gone with my gut and added some crushed corn, however I was trying this recipe "as is" to see if I liked it.
This would not have worked. The corn needs to be mashed in order to convert the starch in the corn into sugar. The mash would need to include another grain in addition to corn to provide the enzymes needed to convert the corn.

Part of me wanted to check the SG to see if it raised as everything settled together, but I dont want to disturb the must and risk oxidizing.
Beer doesn't seem to work this way. But one thought is whether you did a temperature correction on your hydrometer. When it is warm the wort will read a lower SG than when it is at room temperature. It is a significant difference even between say 75F and 60F where many hydrometers are calibrated.

I recommend leaving this one go as written and try another kit for your next batch. Perhaps a kit that includes some "steeping grains" to add more interesting color and flavor to the beer.
 
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Pyg

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This would not have worked. The corn needs to be mashed in order to convert the starch in the corn into sugar. The mash would need to include another grain in addition to corn to provide the enzymes needed to convert the corn.



Beer doesn't seem to work this way. But one thought is whether you did a temperature correction on your hydrometer. When it is warm the wort will read a lower SG than when it is at room temperature. It is a significant difference even between say 75F and 60F where many hydrometers are calibrated.

I recommend leaving this one go as written and try another kit for your next batch. Perhaps a kit that includes some "steeping grains" to add more interesting color and flavor to the beer.
I did look up a conversion for my hydrometer.
It said that the 1.042 at 80F would be 1.044 at 60.
My hydrometer is calibrated for 60F


http://www.brewersfriend.com/hydrometer-temp/

I guess I will let it ride, it is after all my 2nd brew and was intended to be a "lawnmower ale".

I think from here on out I will only make them with grains, and go to the LHBS that specifically sell kits as such.

Thank you for all the help
 
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Pyg

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According to the fermentables in the recipe, 1.042 would be the correct SG. Thirty-six points per gallon for the LME and 44 points per gallon for DME.

Was there an option to go with one gallon less in the fermentor resulting in a higher SG??
Is there an equation I can use to figure out the SG of a potential recipe base on the fermentables?

using my original recipe

LME 3.3x36= 118.8
DME 2x44= 88

206.8 / 5 =41.36

Would that be an SG og 1.041?
 
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flars

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Is there an equation I can use to figure out the SG of a potential recipe base on the fermentables?

using my original recipe

LME 3.3x36= 118.8
DME 2x44= 88

206.8 / 5 =41.36

Would that be an SG og 1.041?
I would call it 1.041 using rounding. That is the same math I use. Some sources will give the PPG a little higher or a little lower for LME and DME. Brewers Friend has an on line calculator, and other calculators, that can be used.
 
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Pyg

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I would call it 1.041 using rounding. That is the same math I use. Some sources will give the PPG a little higher or a little lower for LME and DME. Brewers Friend has an on line calculator, and other calculators, that can be used.
Thanks,
this will be good for future reference, especially if I decide to start brewing someone else recipe.

Brewers friend indicated the fermentables would be 1.036 and a 3.5% abv.

The more I do the math, the more I am worried this will be very low!
 

flars

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Thanks,
this will be good for future reference, especially if I decide to start brewing someone else recipe.

Brewers friend indicated the fermentables would be 1.036 and a 3.5% abv.

The more I do the math, the more I am worried this will be very low!
Don't worry until the bottled beer is fully conditioned. You will probably have a great session beer. Taste, to me, always trumps ABV.
 
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Don't worry until the bottled beer is fully conditioned. You will probably have a great session beer. Taste, to me, always trumps ABV.

It may turn out well. However I wanted to make a Cream ale as the kit indicated, not a session ale.
I dont think I will buy from this LHBS any longer!
 
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It was noticeable monday morning (after pitching yeast Sunday night), now Wednesday morning The airlock has stopped bubbling rapidly.

I guess if it is a low SG it is not unreasonable to believe that the bulk of fermentation would be done in a few days
 
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