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Low abv Gose, fix?

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Gosé the gozarian

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Hi all, I brewed a Gose with a og of 1.040 knowing that I was going to have a low abv. I figured around 3.8. After 2 weeks and the addition of some tart cherries I'm still at 1.026, that's like 1.9%. I'm not sure if the addition of acidulated malt which was about 15% of the grain bill is hindering fermentation or what's going on but my real question is; Is there a way of upping my abv now that I'm in secondary with the cherries or am I going to be kegging slightly alcoholic, slightly tart, cherry water?
 

RPh_Guy

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Hey, welcome to the forum!

Are you using a hydrometer to measure the SG? Make sure it's free floating?

That seems like a lot of acidulated malt. We can help troubleshoot what might have caused a high final gravity if you share your recipe, detailed process, and measurements.

Adding sugar can easily increase the ABV. Just need to dissolve it in some water, dump it in, and allow it to ferment.

P.S. That Shipyard Pumpkinhead Ale was one of my favorites in 2015! Last couple years seem a lot worse.
 
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Gosé the gozarian

Gosé the gozarian

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I agree that the last couple of years have not been their best but before that it was amazing.

So, here's what I started with
3lbs 2 row
3lbs white wheat
1.5lbs flaked oats
1lbs Vienna
2lbs acidulated
Few handfuls of rice hulls
1oz wai iti hops
White Labs wlp036 yeast
Racked from primary to secondary after 1 week and added 3lbs of tart cherries

I am taking all my reading with a hydrometer
I don't have a ph meter so, I'm not sure what my ph is (I have one on the way).
 

Rob2010SS

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What temperature did you mash at?

How long did you mash?

How old was the yeast?

How warm did you pitch yeast (meaning how warm was the wort)?

Did you pitch the yeast right from the fridge into too warm of wort or did you let the yeast come up to room temp?

Did you do a starter?

Without doing the calculations, I don't know for sure but the acid malt could have dropped your pH to a level that is too low, but that shouldn't have affected fermentation I don't think.

Mash temp I think is where you could have gone wrong. Too high and you'll end up with too many unfermentable sugars.
 

RPh_Guy

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@Rob2010SS asked a lot of good questions :)

Also, how did you maintain mash temp?
Is the mash temp thermometer calibrated?
What was the gravity before racking?
Are you sure the cherries contain no preservatives?

Did you not use bacteria to sour, or add salt or coriander?
 

sixwinds

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My gose recipes use a similar amount of acid malt, with no lacto culture. I call it the lazy gose and they come out ok, but not outstanding. However, over three batches I've never had an issue with the fermentation. Just wanted to provide some evidence that large amounts of acid malt are fine.
 
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Gosé the gozarian

Gosé the gozarian

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My gose recipes use a similar amount of acid malt, with no lacto culture. I call it the lazy gose and they come out ok, but not outstanding. However, over three batches I've never had an issue with the fermentation. Just wanted to provide some evidence that large amounts of acid malt are fine.
Thanks for the info, at what point in the mash did you add the acidulated? I think my is so screwy because I added the acid malt with my other grains and should have added later in the mash.
 

RPh_Guy

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It's definitely possible the excessive amount of acid malt might have thrown off the mash pH to the point of reducing enzyme activity.

Sixwinds, your water chemistry may be hugely different from the OP's.

I added the acid malt with my other grains and should have added later in the mash.
This would solve the problem, if that was the issue.

Cheers
 

sixwinds

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RPH Guy, great point and it made me think of something I forgot to add above. Normally I mash without the acid malt for 45minutes, then add the acid and mash for another 30 minutes or so. I think this technique avoids the impact to conversion of the non-acid malts.
 
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