looking for a good book referral for making cheese please

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Bubbles2

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Greetings thanks for looking in,
If you have any good book suggestions I'd appreciate the direction.
Name of Book and Author.
 
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Bubbles2

Bubbles2

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Appreciate it, I am new to cheese making, but baking and cooking have been going on for decades pert near a half century now...Wow time flies. So which one would you suggest for the newby? That selection is like typing into Amazon where there are many choices...Thanks again.
 
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Appreciate it, I am new to cheese making, but baking and cooking have been going on for decades pert near a half century now...Wow time flies. So which one would you suggest for the newby? That selection is like typing into Amazon where there are many choices...Thanks again.
I like the one I have.

Cheesemaking is harder than making beer IMO. No matter which book you get, read the beginning chapters a few times and understand how cheese is made. Try to understand the role of the rennet and the cultures used. No matter what, you'll need a few sessions (and probably some failures) before you really know what's going on. I suppose that was true for beermaking too. Once you've got a few cheeses under your belt, re-read that first chapter!

We talk a little cheesemaking here, but head to the forum over at http://cheeseforum.org for tons more.
 

bernardsmith

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David Asher's The Art of Natural Cheese Making is a wonderful book. It's quite different from the usual suspects in that he argues that you really don't need/want to buy many of the freeze dried cultures and you can use kefir as the culture for almost any cheese, the key differences being the amount of whey you remove; the final acidity of the cheese, the amount of pressure you apply and the aging time.

Another excellent book is Gianaclis Caldwell's Mastering Basic Cheese Making. Caldwell explains the principles that undergird recipes. That means you are not simply following directions but you know why you are doing what you are doing.

A third resource is Gavin Webber's Youtube series on basic cheese making. This is good not so much because he provides you with the undergirding science but because if you have any difficulties imagining what certain processes in fact look like or what the curds should look like his videos do that job really well.
 
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