Looking for a good barleywine recipe

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jayjay

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Hi guys

So i wanna make my first barleywine, however after browsing the internet it seems to me that there are very few recipes with good brewer feedback.

My plan is to make it on my 40l system (is this big enough for a 5 gal batch?), ferment it, and then mature it in kegs on bourbon soaked oak chips for 6-12 months.
I have looked into the BYO Anchorage a deal with the devil recipe, however i found a post on this forum where the users discussed the recipe and they didn't seem too impressed with it.

So if anybody have got a good recipe that they have tried themselves, or have gotten verified as fine by others, i would love to know :)


Cheers
 
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jayjay

jayjay

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And also - for people familiar with the Anchorage BYO recipe -do you reckon that a 40l (10.5 gal) system would be big enough for brewing a 5 gal batch?

The recipe states the following: "This is a single infusion mash, targeting about 1 qt./lb. (2.1 L/kg) water-to-grain mash ratio, roughly 30 quarts (28.4 L). Mash in at 148 °F (64 °C) and hold there for 90 minutes. Next, recirculate until wort is clear and collect as much wort as you can. Bring this up to a boil as soon as possible. Fill the mash tun back up with 24 quarts (22.7 L) of water at 180 °F (82 °C) to mash out. Stir and then recirculate until wort is clear and collect as much as you can. Once you have collected all of the wort, take a specific gravity reading of room temperature wort. The mash should yield approximately 10 gallons (38 L) of 1.078 wort."

Does this mean that i first mash with 28.4l, and then collect the wort in a seperate kettle, followed by a new mash with the same grains but fresh water of 22.7l, which are then collected and mixed with the original wort?

Cheers
 

NTBeer

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Does this mean that i first mash with 28.4l, and then collect the wort in a seperate kettle, followed by a new mash with the same grains but fresh water of 22.7l, which are then collected and mixed with the original wort?

Yes, that's what it seems to mean to me. This is similar to the process I use to get a 5 gallon batch of imperial stout in my 10 gallon kettle, using BIAB. I first mash 70% of my base grain, then drain it into my original 5 gallon pot and start boiling off, while the remainder of the grains mash in the 10 gallon pot. When I remove the bag from the second mash, I combine that wort with the concentrated wort and begin my boil. Adds about 2 hours to the brewday but it gets the job done within the size limitations fir my equipment.
 

Miraculix

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Hi guys

So i wanna make my first barleywine, however after browsing the internet it seems to me that there are very few recipes with good brewer feedback.

My plan is to make it on my 40l system (is this big enough for a 5 gal batch?), ferment it, and then mature it in kegs on bourbon soaked oak chips for 6-12 months.
I have looked into the BYO Anchorage a deal with the devil recipe, however i found a post on this forum where the users discussed the recipe and they didn't seem too impressed with it.

So if anybody have got a good recipe that they have tried themselves, or have gotten verified as fine by others, i would love to know :)


Cheers
Do you want an English barley wine, or an American one?

If English is your goal, the most simple recipe is the best. 90% Chevallier malt, 10% medium to dark invert sugar, Goldings for 50 IBUS. Ferment with A09 Pub, kept at 18C, one pack of US 05 added on end of day two / beginning of day 3 of active fermentation, to further up the attenuation. After day 4, room temperature. Beer is done in about two to three weeks.

Most lovely barley wine you could imagine! Let it age for minimum 6 months and it will be so good, you want to take a bath in it.
 
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DBhomebrew

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Make Your Best English Barleywine

I used Fuggle instead of Goldings, and a dry yeast (Nottingham), and I was happy with the result. I like using Weikert's recipes as jumping-off points. Because he explains why he's adding each ingredient, the recipes are easy to revise and adapt.

I'm drinking this now at ~15 months in the bottle. Challenger for the bittering, all else as published. Delicious! Definitely mild when compared to American styled barley wine.
 

eric19312

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And also - for people familiar with the Anchorage BYO recipe -do you reckon that a 40l (10.5 gal) system would be big enough for brewing a 5 gal batch?

The recipe states the following: "This is a single infusion mash, targeting about 1 qt./lb. (2.1 L/kg) water-to-grain mash ratio, roughly 30 quarts (28.4 L). Mash in at 148 °F (64 °C) and hold there for 90 minutes. Next, recirculate until wort is clear and collect as much wort as you can. Bring this up to a boil as soon as possible. Fill the mash tun back up with 24 quarts (22.7 L) of water at 180 °F (82 °C) to mash out. Stir and then recirculate until wort is clear and collect as much as you can. Once you have collected all of the wort, take a specific gravity reading of room temperature wort. The mash should yield approximately 10 gallons (38 L) of 1.078 wort."

Does this mean that i first mash with 28.4l, and then collect the wort in a seperate kettle, followed by a new mash with the same grains but fresh water of 22.7l, which are then collected and mixed with the original wort?

Cheers

sounds like recipe author is describing a batch sparge. The first runnings will be about 16 quarts...the sparge runnings will be another 24 quarts. So you are going to start your boil with 40 quarts in your kettle. This will likely boil over in a 10.5 gallon kettle. You may want to start your boil in two kettles and then combine them after hot break is done and some evaporation has happened. I suppose this is going to be a long boil to concentrate your 10 gallons of 1.078 wort into something like 7 gallons of 1.110 wort?
 

patto1ro

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Hi guys

So i wanna make my first barleywine, however after browsing the internet it seems to me that there are very few recipes with good brewer feedback.

My plan is to make it on my 40l system (is this big enough for a 5 gal batch?), ferment it, and then mature it in kegs on bourbon soaked oak chips for 6-12 months.
I have looked into the BYO Anchorage a deal with the devil recipe, however i found a post on this forum where the users discussed the recipe and they didn't seem too impressed with it.

So if anybody have got a good recipe that they have tried themselves, or have gotten verified as fine by others, i would love to know :)


Cheers
This is a classic pale barley Wine recipe.

1956 Tennant's Gold Label
pale malt
14,75 lb​
67,82%​
enzymic malt
0,25 lb​
1,15%​
flaked maize
4,00 lb​
18,39%​
No. 1 invert sugar
2,75 lb​
12,64%​
Fuggles 230 mins
2,50 oz​
Goldings 230 mins
0,75 oz​
Goldings 60 mins
3,25 oz​
Hallertau dry hops
0,67 oz​
OG
1103,5​
FG
1020​
ABV
11,05​
Apparent attenuation
80,68%​
IBU
72​
SRM
9​
Mash at
147º F​
Sparge at
165º F​
Boil time230 minutes
pitching temp
56º F​
YeastWyeast 1099 Whitbread ale
 

patto1ro

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Hi guys

So i wanna make my first barleywine, however after browsing the internet it seems to me that there are very few recipes with good brewer feedback.

My plan is to make it on my 40l system (is this big enough for a 5 gal batch?), ferment it, and then mature it in kegs on bourbon soaked oak chips for 6-12 months.
I have looked into the BYO Anchorage a deal with the devil recipe, however i found a post on this forum where the users discussed the recipe and they didn't seem too impressed with it.

So if anybody have got a good recipe that they have tried themselves, or have gotten verified as fine by others, i would love to know :)


Cheers
And here's a dark one from the same brewery:

1956 Tennant's No. 1
pale malt
16,75 lb​
75,28%​
crystal malt 60 L
0,50 lb​
2,25%​
black malt
0,50 lb​
2,25%​
enzymic malt
0,25 lb​
1,12%​
flaked maize
1,50 lb​
6,74%​
No. 2 invert sugar
2,75 lb​
12,36%​
Goldings 240 mins
3,00 oz​
Goldings 120 mins
1,75 oz​
Goldings 60 mins
1,75 oz​
Hallertau dry hops
0,75 oz​
OG
1101​
FG
1023,5​
ABV
10,25​
Apparent attenuation
76,73%​
IBU
78​
SRM
25​
Mash at
149º F​
Sparge at
165º F​
Boil time240 minutes
pitching temp
57º F​
YeastWyeast 1099 Whitbread ale

I wouldn't worry about the enzymic malt. That's just a weird 1950s ting.
 

patto1ro

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Make Your Best English Barleywine

I used Fuggle instead of Goldings, and a dry yeast (Nottingham), and I was happy with the result. I like using Weikert's recipes as jumping-off points. Because he explains why he's adding each ingredient, the recipes are easy to revise and adapt.
I really wouldn't recommend trying to brew an English Barley Wine from 100% malt. You're going to end up with a sticky mess. 80% malt and 20% flaked corn and invert sugar should get a low enough FG.

I recently judged the style in a professional competition and every single beer was far too sweet and sticky. Nothing at all like genuine commercial English versions.
 

AlexKay

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I really wouldn't recommend trying to brew an English Barley Wine from 100% malt. You're going to end up with a sticky mess. 80% malt and 20% flaked corn and invert sugar should get a low enough FG.

I recently judged the style in a professional competition and every single beer was far too sweet and sticky. Nothing at all like genuine commercial English versions.
Well, I thought it turned out well. Definitely not too sweet. BJCP guidelines for 17D suggest malt as the only ingredients, with no mention of adjuncts. I’d be willing to bet there are no commercial examples that use flaked corn, but agree on the sugar. Me, I’d try to cut back on sweetness (if it were a problem) by cutting crystal, maybe even completely. Or by hopping more to balance. But that’s just me.
 

patto1ro

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Well, I thought it turned out well. Definitely not too sweet. BJCP guidelines for 17D suggest malt as the only ingredients, with no mention of adjuncts. I’d be willing to bet there are no commercial examples that use flaked corn, but agree on the sugar. Me, I’d try to cut back on sweetness (if it were a problem) by cutting crystal, maybe even completely. Or by hopping more to balance. But that’s just me.
I wouldn't take the BJCP guidelines as gospel. (And I say that as someone who contributed to the last set.)

As for commercial examples and flaked corn, look at the two recipes I posted above. I would put money on Gold Label, one of the classic examples, still containing flaked corn.
 

AlexKay

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Ok, I’ll cede the point … I’m certainly not an expert on British brewing practices. As a brewer, I’d still look at lowering sweetness by replacing crystal with more pale malt. Actually, replacing crystal with pale malt is probably good advice for a whole lot of recipes …
 

patto1ro

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Ok, I’ll cede the point … I’m certainly not an expert on British brewing practices. As a brewer, I’d still look at lowering sweetness by replacing crystal with more pale malt. Actually, replacing crystal with pale malt is probably good advice for a whole lot of recipes …
Flaked corn used to be in around 90% of UK beers. Longer-established breweries like Harveys still use it. The new-fangled craft brewers won't. Unless they're brewing one of my historic recipes, of course.
 

DuncB

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I'm just planning on brewing this


If it comes out anywhere near the original I'll be over the moon. Memorable the few times I've had it.
Planning on this water profile and a mash pH of 5.3
Ca 187 Mg35 Na 40 Cl 204 SO4 330 Bicarb 126

Will use WLP 099 super high gravity ale yeast, starter, nutrients and oxygen.
Then wait.
 

Shenanigans

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Every year for the last 3 years I have brewed an American Barleywine to use up any hops that are starting to get old in my freezer. Hopped up to over 200 IBUs (calculated).
Tastes terrible for the 1st 3 months, is then drinkable but after 6 months tastes very good, if you are into this style. Never lasted more than 10 months.
I have brewed it both with US-05 and Voss Kveik.
The Kveik was finished in a week and ready a bit quicker to drink too.

No sparge mash and made another beer with the second runnings.
Here's the last one I did with Voss which turned out to be very drinkable for a 12% beer.

1647421102876.png
 

Shenanigans

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Can you notice the taste of those Summit Hops? I understood they were just good for bittering.

As you can imagine it's quite a complex beer so difficult to say if I could identify Summit specifically but there was an orangy hint which could have been contributed to by the yeast or some of the other hops.

I have however brewed with summit in a more "normal" Pale ales and definitely got a nice tangerine flavor off them.

This here for example turned out very tasty:

American Pale Ale - Sacred Summit Pale Ale (AG) [[ Gold Medal and Best In Show ]] | Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Summit has got a bad rap because some brewer's have gotten undesired garlic notes off it.
So if they buy it again they only use it for bittering due to it's high AA and low price.
From what I have read this garlic note can be due to personal sensitivity or time of harvest and varies from batch to batch.

I myself have brewed about 5 beers with 2 different batches and was always happy with it.
 

kevin58

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Well, I thought it turned out well. Definitely not too sweet. BJCP guidelines for 17D suggest malt as the only ingredients, with no mention of adjuncts. I’d be willing to bet there are no commercial examples that use flaked corn, but agree on the sugar. Me, I’d try to cut back on sweetness (if it were a problem) by cutting crystal, maybe even completely. Or by hopping more to balance. But that’s just me.
Ok, I’ll cede the point … I’m certainly not an expert on British brewing practices. As a brewer, I’d still look at lowering sweetness by replacing crystal with more pale malt. Actually, replacing crystal with pale malt is probably good advice for a whole lot of recipes …



One of the best sites to find info on British brewing is @patto1ro 's blog, Shut Up About Barclay Perkins, or in many of the books he has written. The recipes he shared above are taken directly from the brewing logs of Tennant's brewery. For anyone interested he posts two historic recipes each week.

 

AlexKay

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One of the best sites to find info on British brewing is @patto1ro 's blog, Shut Up About Barclay Perkins, or in many of the books he has written. The recipes he shared above are taken directly from the brewing logs of Tennant's brewery. For anyone interested he posts two historic recipes each week.

So he’s written some books … but this is the Internet, and I have an opinion!
 

1bottlerocket

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I am reading the Allen and Cantwell book and that has inspired us to start developing a Barley Wine recipe. The Tennent's recipe looks interesting, the addition of crystal malts above the 2% range looks like it veers off into a path that will produce more sweetness than desired when combined with the extended boil time.

I would think that omitting the specialty malts, and sticking with the 240 minute boil time would be enough to achieve color and flavor profile.

We are looking at 100% Marris Otter grain bill and using all low alpha English noble hops.
 

1bottlerocket

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This is a classic pale barley Wine recipe.

1956 Tennant's Gold Label
pale malt
14,75 lb​
67,82%​
enzymic malt
0,25 lb​
1,15%​
flaked maize
4,00 lb​
18,39%​
No. 1 invert sugar
2,75 lb​
12,64%​
Fuggles 230 mins
2,50 oz​
Goldings 230 mins
0,75 oz​
Goldings 60 mins
3,25 oz​
Hallertau dry hops
0,67 oz​
OG
1103,5​
FG
1020​
ABV
11,05​
Apparent attenuation
80,68%​
IBU
72​
SRM
9​
Mash at
147º F​
Sparge at
165º F​
Boil time230 minutes
pitching temp
56º F​
YeastWyeast 1099 Whitbread ale
What are the batch size and water details of this recipe? Thanks!
 

FatCat Brewing

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Hi all, I'm new to the forum but have been brewing extract for a year or so with some cider thrown in for a change. My inventory:
Fermentables:
12 lbs LME (Maillard Malts Gold Malt Syrup)
2 lbs Briess Golden Light DME
2 lbs of coloring/specialty/steeping malts.
Hops:
Centennial 1oz
Cascade 5oz
Citra 3oz
Chinook 1oz
German Pearl 1oz.
I am thinking about using all my fermentables to make a 5g Barleywine batch to use up my inventory before I start making an all grain brew. I know Safale 05 will probably work but I am thinking about using a Kveik yeast for the brew. Any one have thoughts/suggestions on the yeast and/or which of my hops to use?
 

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