London ESB 1968 - used in IPAs

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taylorjohn11892

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I have used this yeast in a couple of IPAs now and I can't tell if I like it or not. I used it in two dry hopped IPAs and it really overtakes the taste IMO. I know this yeast isn't traditionally used in IPAs but I thought it might work.

It has a sweet, slightly spicy, fruity character but it honestly just tastes weird!

My fermentation was clean and healthy. Temperatures were fine. Does anyone else share this same opinion on the flavor profile of this yeast?

Thanks!
 

str1p3s

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I agree it has a pretty distinct taste that I don't know if I'm a big fan of yet. I've made a nut brown, a porter, and most recently, an ESB with it and they have all had the same distinct taste.

In my opinion it has worked best in the ESB. I don't think I would want that taste in an IPA.
 

str1p3s

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To clarify, I've used the Fuller's strain serveral times, not specifically the Wyeast version. I think I've used S-04, WLP002, and Imperial Pub. Same background taste in all of them.
 

Dirty25

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There is a ton of good commercial IPAs brewed with this yeast. I’ve had good results with it in the 66-68 degree range in getting a clean profile.

What did your beer ferment at?
 

HausBrauerei_Harvey

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after using 1968 in british ales for a few years I recently switched to imperials "pub" strain the last six months, I really like it. I can ferment is at 66-68 for some nice british character, and it works low (62-64) for a cleaner ferment I've used in pale ales and american wheats with great success, according to my palate and my club members as well.
 

ESBrewer

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1968 tastes great... but it leaves some residual sweetness and mutes the hop character so it is not that common in ipas. But Fuller's brews a decent, balanced, bottle conditioned English IPA, too. It is not extremely hoppy.
 
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taylorjohn11892

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There is a ton of good commercial IPAs brewed with this yeast. I’ve had good results with it in the 66-68 degree range in getting a clean profile.

What did your beer ferment at?


Average fermentation temp around 69-70. Maybe need to ferment lower eh?

Thanks!
 

Northern_Brewer

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To clarify, I've used the Fuller's strain serveral times, not specifically the Wyeast version. I think I've used S-04, WLP002, and Imperial Pub. Same background taste in all of them.

S-04 isn't Fuller's - traditionally it's been said to be a dry version of Whitbread B, but it may be more closely related to Ringwood and Nottingham.

And there's some debate as to whether WLP002 is Fuller's - it's similar but seems to be not quite the same as their current production yeast.

As far as temperatures for these yeasts go, you may want to look at the lengthy thread here :
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/...emps-and-profiles-cybi-other-thoughts.221817/

69-70 wort temperature (never mind air temperature) would definitely be on the high side for British yeasts, and it's no surprise that you're getting some unwanted flavours in there.
 

sborz22

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I think Lagunitas uses this strain almost exclusively.

That's interesting, I have read elsewhere that they use a chico strain that is similar to WLP001. I am a big fan of the seemingly clean fermentation taste that I taste from their beer. Also, I know that they have also dabbled with the Sac Trois yeast as well.

If what you are saying is true, I may have to look into trying this out in my next IPA.
 

deadwolfbones

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That's interesting, I have read elsewhere that they use a chico strain that is similar to WLP001. I am a big fan of the seemingly clean fermentation taste that I taste from their beer. Also, I know that they have also dabbled with the Sac Trois yeast as well.

If what you are saying is true, I may have to look into trying this out in my next IPA.

I've seen it mentioned in various forum threads over the years but never explicitly verified.

Example: https://www.beeradvocate.com/commun...agunitas-brews-their-signature-flavor.194959/
 

sborz22

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str1p3s

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S-04 isn't Fuller's - traditionally it's been said to be a dry version of Whitbread B, but it may be more closely related to Ringwood and Nottingham.

I stand corrected. After some googling it appears I was assuming wrong. I haven't used S-04 in a while so maybe the taste I'm remembering was something else.
 

couchsending

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Firestone Walker uses 1968 as does 3 Floyds and Creature Comforts just to name a few. They make great hoppy beers.

If you want good attenuation you need to step mash it.

It needs lots of O2 to not produce diacetyl, or less diacetyl.

Don’t add first dry hop until .5 Plato from FG at the earliest otherwise those hops will be wasted.

This is basically what FW and Creature Comforts do based on interviews and info gathered on the web.

Step Mash
145/154/168
- 1968 struggles with maltotriose so you need the low 145 step to produce more maltose and get a lower FG.

Pitch at 64, ferment at 66. Bump to 68 as Ferm slows. FW dry hops at the very end of Ferm, then again. CC waits until Ferm is done and yeast has been pulled before DH. CC keeps DH temps close to 70 until negative for VDKs.

1968/002 is notorious for producing diacetyl even after you think it’s cleaned up. Dry hopping especially can create refermentation and additional diacetyl so make sure it’s cleaned up before cooling. It’s also notorious for producing diacetyl when priming with sugar. If you are bottling I would add a little additional dry yeast at bottling. T-58 or CBC-1 specifically won’t consume any additional sugars that 002 didn’t so you won’t get bottle bombs.

Once you get to know 002 you can make incredibly clear mature beers in a very short time cause it ferments super fast and floccs crazy hard. This is also the reason it mutes Hop flavor and aroma. Dry hopping After the beer has cleared will give you the most defined Hop flavor and aroma. From a production setting you can turn and burn beers incredibly fast with this yeast but again you need to know exactly how to use it or it can produce some gross butter laiden sweet malty beers.
 

stevehaun

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What couchsending says!

If I use this yeast, I mash in the 148-150F range. I ferment at 62-64F for 72-96 hours and then let the temp rise to 68-70F.
 
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