Load safety on circuit

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Homebrew Harry

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Should be good to go from here out. I was running around 2100 watts at 115volts
It sure seems like you are good to go. It looks like you have the circuit loaded to almost 92%, but since it is a dedicated circuit and you are on site I don't see any problem. I almost asked you to look at the rating on your GFCI outlet, but you said it was already installed.
I'm glad it is working and staying cool.
 
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sicktght311

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It sure seems like you are good to go. It looks like you have the circuit loaded to almost 92%, but since it is a dedicated circuit and you are on site I don't see any problem. I almost asked you to look at the rating on your GFCI outlet, but you said it was already installed.
I'm glad it is working and staying cool.
What rating are you referring to? Its a 20amp GFCI Eaton outlet. Wired directly to the screw terminals (not the push in fire hazards)
 
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sicktght311

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That's it. Good deal !
Lol oh yeah. If i went through all this conversation and talk, only to put a 15amp breaker in, i would deserve whatever happened hah. I installed the outlet myself. It was a random single outlet tucked away in my drop ceiling that i never even know was there until we had to renovate the basement. Probably was at one time for an air conditioner or a dehumidifer or something. So once i confirmed it was 12/2 wiring, and traced it back to the breaker confirming it was the only outlet on the line, i knew it was good for a dedicated brewing outlet. Just needed to replace with GFCI and i was good to go
 

Homebrew Harry

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Lol oh yeah. If i went through all this conversation and talk, only to put a 15amp breaker in, i would deserve whatever happened hah. I installed the outlet myself. It was a random single outlet tucked away in my drop ceiling that i never even know was there until we had to renovate the basement. Probably was at one time for an air conditioner or a dehumidifer or something. So once i confirmed it was 12/2 wiring, and traced it back to the breaker confirming it was the only outlet on the line, i knew it was good for a dedicated brewing outlet. Just needed to replace with GFCI and i was good to go
That's a happy coincidence there was a dedicated circuit already there whatever it was for.
 

jseyfert3

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120v is not actual voltage in the US. Depending on time of day and your house and area, that can be anywhere from 105 to 120volts actual.
120 volts is very much the actual voltage in the US, and is specified by ANSI C84.1. Range A in the standard (or what is the normal voltage) specifies a service voltage of 120 volts plus or minus 5%, so an in-spec unloaded residential voltage is 114-126 volts. There is a range B that allows service voltages to drop as low as 110 at the very lowest, but events causing voltage to be in range B must be limited in extent, frequency, and duration. In other words if they occur frequently the utility is required to correct things to get the voltages back to the 114-126 volt spec. There is no allowance for a service voltage of 105 volts.

I think the lowest unloaded voltage I’ve ever seen has been around 117 volts. Normally it’s plus or minus a couple volts from 120, as it should be.

Now, it’s certainly possible to see the loaded circuit voltage drop below 110, if you have a heavy load and a lot of voltage drop, but 110 is an abnormal voltage to see at an outlet in the US barring this. In the spec the absolute minimum voltage anything in your house should have when fully loaded with maximum NEC allowed voltage drops and the minimum of the range B service voltage (which again is not normal) is 104 volts. And this is very, very much an edge case. Devices are likely to start having issues here, especially motors.

Sorry, got on my soapbox there, a pet peeve of mine when people say the standard voltage in the US is not 120 volts, because that very much is the standard voltage in the US.
 

itsnotrequired

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Sorry, got on my soapbox there, a pet peeve of mine when people say the standard voltage in the US is not 120 volts, because that very much is the standard voltage in the US.
this is due to individuals misinterpreting the phrase "standard" to mean as "constant", just a nomenclature thing. also note that range a 114-126V applies to the service voltage or the voltage at the service point (typically the meter socket for residential applications). voltage regulation downstream of the service point falls on the user (homeowner). as you indicate, heavy loads can drop local voltage but can also be caused by long conductor runs, say to a detached structure a significant distance from the service point. so even though the service entrance may be to spec, a remote building may not be.
 

Homebrew Harry

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this is due to individuals misinterpreting the phrase "standard" to mean as "constant", just a nomenclature thing. also note that range a 114-126V applies to the service voltage or the voltage at the service point (typically the meter socket for residential applications). voltage regulation downstream of the service point falls on the user (homeowner). as you indicate, heavy loads can drop local voltage but can also be caused by long conductor runs, say to a detached structure a significant distance from the service point. so even though the service entrance may be to spec, a remote building may not be.
^Yes Sir. Also, I have noticed that voltage drops on long runs won't show themselves fully until a load is applied
 

doug293cz

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^Yes Sir. Also, I have noticed that voltage drops on long runs won't show themselves fully until a load is applied
Well, you only get voltage drops when there is current flowing. The wires are resistors, and the longer and thinner the wires the higher the resistance (R). Ohms law gives the relation between voltage drop (V), current (I), and R:
V = I * R​
Thus if I = 0, then V must also = 0.

Brew on :mug:
 
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