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Little partial mash help

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SRTBREW

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Hey guys I'm an extract brewer wanting to try my hand at partial mash. I just need a little clarification on the process. I don't really need to know the why of things. I've read the howtobrew site on all grain brewing and found it a little confusing. If some one could please just do a quick rundown of the most simple process and equipment needed it would be very VERY appreciated.

Also I'm looking to do a nut brown ale for my first pm. If anyone has a recipe for this please post.

Thanks, Jason
 

FatMonsters

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This BYO article is the one that I used when I went to PM. I have moved onto AG in the last two brews, but this is an excellent how to PM article and it has three recipes at the end.
 

ohiobrewtus

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With a PM you're steeping some grains for flavor. For a 5 gallon batch this is typically 3 pounds of grain or less. The grain is soaked in 150ish degree water for 30-45 minutes, then you add your extract and continue brewing just as you would if you were doing an extract batch. Top off to 5 gallons and that's all she wrote.

Check the recipe database for a nut brown.
 

BeehiveBrewer

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SRTBREW, with a partial mash, you are not only steeping specialty grains for flavor, color, and aroma, you are MASHING base malt for fermentable sugars. Base malt can't be steeped like specialty grains, it has to be mashed otherwise you won't extract much of the sugar from the starchy grain.

A partial mash is a happy medium between an extract batch and all grain. It is more simple than an all grain batch because you don't need a high BTU burner, You don't need a 10-12 gallon kettle, you don't have to do it outside (great for apartment dwellers), if you mess up your efficiency you can make up the difference with extract, yet you have more control over an all extract batch.

Until now, your grain bill has been limited to whatever the maltster decided to mash and evaporate. With a partial mash, you can add some grains that need to be mashed but aren't typically part of a malt extract grain bill.

You don't need all that much more equipment to do partial mashes. The articles linked above are good ones. You can build your own mashtun or buy one. I got a 5 gal from morebeer.com

Good luck!
 
OP
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SRTBREW

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Wow...just wow. I almost feel this should be a sticky for new pm brewers. All of these sites have been very informative and have helped me understand the method I'll be using. Thank you all so much for your replies and information. :tank::mug:

It looks like I'll be in the market for aroung a 3 gallon cooler, and will be getting a cooler conversion kit from my lhbs. My plan is to generally use aroung 5 pounds of grain and finish up with dme.

If anyone has more info please share.
 

Surfman

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This is the 1st method i cam across and it works great. I do all my brews like this, at least until i get my sh!t together to go all grain.
 

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