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liquid yeast advantages

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mrkeeg

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Hi again all.

Thanks very much for the helpful information under my other queries.

Now... nearly everything I read emphasizes the importance of yeast. For my curiosity, can someone explain, briefly, the reason for all the hype?

I think I understand the idea of a starter... whether using dry or liquid yeast. Your beer is most "vulnerable" between cooling and the start of vigorous fermentation, so adding a larger volume, larger number of very active yeast right away shortens this "window of vulnerability". Also, the lower SG of the starter (compared to your full wort) makes it easier/more assured for the yeast to get going. The smaller volume of the starter lets the yeast dominate it quickly, limiting potential for contamination at that stage. Is that about right?

As for the liquid yeast... WHY is it so much better?

Thanks much again!
Keegan
 

jeffbones

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Well I've only done a few batches, but from what I've read the type and quality of the yeast you use is so important is because it makes the magic happen :cool:
 

wwgiese

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mrkeeg said:
Hi again all.

Thanks very much for the helpful information under my other queries.

Now... nearly everything I read emphasizes the importance of yeast. For my curiosity, can someone explain, briefly, the reason for all the hype?

I think I understand the idea of a starter... whether using dry or liquid yeast. Your beer is most "vulnerable" between cooling and the start of vigorous fermentation, so adding a larger volume, larger number of very active yeast right away shortens this "window of vulnerability". Also, the lower SG of the starter (compared to your full wort) makes it easier/more assured for the yeast to get going. The smaller volume of the starter lets the yeast dominate it quickly, limiting potential for contamination at that stage. Is that about right?


Thanks much again!



Keegan



liquid yeast usualy has more healthy yeast cells in it than dry. You can get some liquid yeast starters that advertise that you just pitch and go with no need to make a starter. I have used them but I still made a starter any way
 

uglygoat

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the liquid yeast is miles ahead of the dry packets. the variety alone in choice of liquid yeast makes it more desirable than dry. the yeast, imo has a very important say in how your beer tastes, and as such, dry only gives you one option really. the liquid stuff, like whitelabs, as yeast strains that are specific to certian beer styles, and you can tell the difference when using different styles of liquid yeast. well worth the six buck, and then you make three batches off one slurry and you've saved yerself a few pennies and made gooder tastin' beer. ;)

try the liquid, you'll be happy you did, i am :)
 

Janx

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wwgiese said:
liquid yeast usualy has more healthy yeast cells in it than dry. You can get some liquid yeast starters that advertise that you just pitch and go with no need to make a starter. I have used them but I still made a starter any way
Actually, I don't think that's true. I'm pretty sure the cell count in dry yeast is MUCH higher than in liquid cultures. That's why a starter is so important with liquid.

The reason to use liquid is that your beer will taste better. That really is the only reason you need. Ferment the same recipe with dry and with liquid and the liquid one will taste better. It's probably just that liquid is more appropriate strains of yeast.

Add to that the immense variety of yeasts available in liquid form. You really can't make a Kolsh or dubbel or lambic or English Bitter with dry yeast and expect it to be authentic tasting.
 
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