Light or Lite hoppy beer recipe process

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InspectorJon

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I want to make something like Lagunitas DayTime, a low carb, low calorie beer. They did an interesting write up on DayTime and the lite beer concept, Beer 101: Low Carb IPA. I do not necessarily want to clone this beer but want to learn how to make something like it. @shoreman started a thread here that hasn't gone far but has some general information.

For the sake of definition I’m going to say “lite” beer is low in calories and low in carbs. Low calorie will mean lower ABV since alcohol = calories. Low carb will require very low FG with little or no sugar (fermentable or not) or starch left in solution. One might also call this a session beer but I feel like that does not necessarily mean low carb. So we are looking for a low carb session beer.

This light/lite beer is not a BJCP Light Lager which is a "Highly carbonated, very light-bodied, nearly flavorless lager designed to be consumed very cold. Very refreshing and thirst quenching". I am assuming the Lagunitas version is an ale and it is certainly not nearly flavorless.

A few excerpts from the Lagunitas site:
Where most beer styles are defined by flavor, Sessions are about the combo of drinkability & low-alcohol content (ABV). At only 98 Cals, 3 Carbs & 4% ABV, DayTime IPA represents everything we know about making hop-forward beer.

DayTime IPA is a gentle canvas of malts and fluff-ifying oats splashed with a cannonball of hops—lots of Centennial and Citra hops. ABV 4% 30 IBU 1.036 OG

The problem comes in that, typically, the brewer is not able to convert all the starch in the grain into maltose or other fermentable sugars. In traditional and craft brewing, there is always a measure of unfermentable carbohydrates left behind that make it into the final product. . . . So how do we go about reducing carbs? The answer comes in two forms. If you want to get pretty close to a low carb beer, you start by lowering your mash temperature. This allows your alpha-amylase to work for longer before it degrades due to high heat (again, go read that January article!). The longer your alpha-amylase works for, the more maltose you will form, the more fermentable your wort will be and the less starch, and hence carbs, will be left over in the final product.


(What is) the modern process of low-carb beer production - It is as simple as adding an exogenous enzyme called amyloglucosidase (or gamma-amylase). These enzymes (often taken from Aspergillus, a fungi) are incredibly good at cleaving all the bonds in starch, creating free glucose, which yeast like even better than maltose. This enzyme can either be added to the mash (Lagunitas style) or the fermenter. By adding it to the mash, we ensure it doesn’t accidentally get into beers it isn’t supposed to, however the efficiency is just a little less.

I am assuming that amyloglucosidase is the same thing as Glucoamylase that folks use in brut beer? @bracconiere
 

bracconiere

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am assuming that amyloglucosidase is the same thing as Glucoamylase that folks use in brut beer?

yep, here's what i use...

 
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InspectorJon

InspectorJon

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Here is a rough first draft:

1.036 OG worth of malt.
90% two row or pilsner malt
10% oats, malted or flaked
2:1 Centennial:Citra hops, 10 min and flame out for 30 IBU
DayTime has a little haze so I'm thinking a moderate dryhop with Citra and another citrus/pine hop.
A light hoppy water profile with plenty of calcium but not real high in sulfates.
Glucoamylase in the mash and maybe fermenter also.
Mash @145F/63C 90 min.
A higher attenuating west coast ale yeast.

I'm not sure how to put this in a recipe calculator. Am I right in assuming that the Gluco will change the brewhouse efficiency to be a higher number? Anyone have experience with this?
 

bracconiere

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i tried adding gluco to the mash, and the beer didn't go dry. if i tried it in the mash again, i'd probably try a reverse step mash. maybe sparge with room temp water and when the grain bed hit's something like 120f add the gluco? not sure, i've just always added my gluco to the fermenter....
 

bracconiere

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i usually eyeball ~1g/gallon. so i add about 11-12grms to a 10 gallon batch of 1.060 OG wort.. gets me down to .999-1.001 in good order...

i'd say your recipe sounds good for a hoppy light beer. what i mean is i'd like drinking it :mug:

edit: with the yeast pitch.
 

chthon

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I suppose you could also use the Mangrove Jack's M29 (French Saison), M41 (Belgian Ale) and M31 (Belgian Tripel) yeasts. No, you won't get as low as using amylase enzymes, but definitely low enough so that remaining calories really don't matter.

I have brewed two year in a row a low alcohol beer (well, a saison, but is it still a saison when one uses diastatic abbey yeasts? But the spirit is saison; low FG, high bitterness, low alcohol) (3,9%, that's including carbonation which is 3 volumes of CO2), with only Merkur (a disease resistant Magnum) as hop for bittering and flavor. Rather high bittering for the first hop gift, then rather high before the end of the boil (15 minutes) for the flavor gift. The tannins from the hop should help the body and the mouth feel of the beer.
 
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InspectorJon

InspectorJon

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I suppose you could also use the Mangrove Jack's M29 (French Saison), M41 (Belgian Ale) and M31 (Belgian Tripel) yeasts. No, you won't get as low as using amylase enzymes, but definitely low enough so that remaining calories really don't matter.

I have brewed two year in a row a low alcohol beer (well, a saison, but is it still a saison when one uses diastatic abbey yeasts? But the spirit is saison; low FG, high bitterness, low alcohol) (3,9%, that's including carbonation which is 3 volumes of CO2), with only Merkur (a disease resistant Magnum) as hop for bittering and flavor. Rather high bittering for the first hop gift, then rather high before the end of the boil (15 minutes) for the flavor gift. The tannins from the hop should help the body and the mouth feel of the beer.
I am not a fan of most Belgian beers. My pallet has never learned to appreciate the clove and banana flavors. I am struggling with the Brewers Friend recipe calculator trying to find how they get only 3 carbs in the final product. Lagunitas claims 1.036 OG, 4% ABV and 3 Carbs. I can't find a way to match those calculations. I'm not focused on the calories so much as the carbs. Alcohol has no carbs.
 
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InspectorJon

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I sacrificed half a can of DayTime in the name of research and degassed some to find a FG of 1.006. Well it was not a total sacrifice. I drank the 60 degree flat beer to analyze the flavor... Some digging @deadwolfbones seems to indicate that Lagunitas uses an English yeast strain (WLP002 / WYEAST 1968) but we don't know that for sure.
1664055198496.jpeg
 
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InspectorJon

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So HERE is my first try at putting this in the Brewers Friend recipe calculator. I have assumed 83% attenuation based on gluco in the mash and not the fermenter. The crystal 10 is there because it's already mixed in the grain I have from Two Hearted kits I bought on sale. I can't get the carbs below 10 despite matching all of Lagunitas numbers pretty close. Switching out the crystal for 2 row doesn't seem to make much difference in that regard. To get the calories and carbs down I can lower the grain amount for 1.030 OG and boost the attenuation to 100% and get close to Lagunitas' numbers but the OG is too low. Maybe I'll have to try it both ways.
 

aceluby

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What if you subbed out some of your grain for pure sugar? Would obviously impact body, but I would think that would decrease the unfermentable carbs.
 
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InspectorJon

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I tried substituting with 8 oz of cane sugar and #1 invert. It did not drop the carbs significantly. The can sugar lowered the FG and raised the alcohol and lowered the carbs slightly but not enough for the loss of character that I suspect it might induce. I want to avoid "nearly flavorless" thin Lite beer.
 
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InspectorJon

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I found these comments in the comments section of a Brulosophy post on brewing a Brut IPA.

"Amylo™ 300 (glucoamylase) works optimally well in brew house mash at temperature of 55-62C~ (131-144F) and pH ranges of 5.4 – 5.6. Amylo™ 300 is active up to 65C (149F)."

"At our brewery we find that a rest at 144 for 60 minutes nets us a FG of 1.002 or lower, and we get to denature the wort in the boil to avoid any packaging issues that could happen."

There is a short sub-redit on Keto brewing. Some notes I found:
For enzymes added to the mash I mash at 145F for 1.3 hr, adding the enzyme during my pH check at 20 minutes. Always hit 1.000.

We’ve done ours at 142. With enzyme finished st 1.000

Techniques from Kim Sturdavant, arguably the originator of Brut IPA:

More from Ken:
"I'm finding better results with fermentation character and hop aromatics by having no enzyme present in the fermentation."

Lastly, it is very important to add nutrient to the boil as well as 1/2 way through fermentation (with something like BSG's Startup) since the wort will be almost entirely glucose, there is not a lot of nutrition for the yeast.
 
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InspectorJon

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Edited 10/1/22 to reflect actual brew day experience.
I am going to brew this tomorrow if the glucoamylase arrive in the mail today as it's suppose to.

Brewers Friend recipe builder
2 gallons into the fermentor (2.75 actual)
Grain
31 oz 63.1% Rahr - Standard 2-Row
15 oz 30.5% Quaker Quick Oats
3.10 oz 6.3% Caramel/Crystal 10L

Hops -T90 pellets, 2020 YVH
12 g Centennial Boil 10 min
6 g Citra Boil 10 min
12 18 g Centennial Whirlpool at 170 °F 20 min
6 12 g Citra Whirlpool at 170 °F 20 min
12 g Citra Dry Hop Day 5
5 6 g Sabro Dry Hop
66 g
Actual whirlpool was between 170 and 160

Mash
3.25 gal strike water, BIAB Infusion 144 °F 90 min
Add Glucoamylase when temp is stable below 146 °F
Actual mash was 148 at strike, let drop to 144 over 30 minutes. Added 3 grams gluco and held 144 for 90 minutes. I used dry powder gluco at 1 gram per pound of grain. Made a slurry with a small amount of filtered water and stirred that into the mash at 144 °F.

3.25 gallons of very soft mountain runoff water
1.5 g Calcium Chloride (dihydrate)
2.2 g Gypsum
Ca Mg Na Cl SO4
90 1.0 5.0 79 104
Bru'n Water predicts 5.22 pH, BF predicts 5.45pH

Intended 60 minute boil @ .75 gallon/hr loss
Actual - 50 Min boil @ .5 gallon/hr loss

Yeast, Imperial Yeast - A62 Bell because it’s in the fermentor now
Yeast is actually harvested and propped up from cans of Bell's Two Hearted.

Predictions:
Original Gravity: 1.036 (Had to dilute to achieve this.)
Final Gravity: 1.005
ABV: 4%
IBU: 30
SRM: 2.97

Brew Day Notes:
Predicted pre-boil gravity was 1.027. I ended up with 1.034 after mash. Brewer's Friend usually gets me very close but this was off by .007. I had to boost Brewhouse efficiency to 90% in the recipe builder to account for this. Normal for me is between 70 and 75%. I attribute this to to gluco and long mash. I boiled 10 minutes less than the plan and boiled very gently and still ended up with 1.040 FG. Added 1.4 quarts of water to bring gravity back down to 1.036. Racked sweet wort on top of yeast cake from a previous 1.75 gallon batch of 5% abv pale ale. Wort was 75 °F, I set fermentation temperature to 68 °F. Ink Bird temperature probe is fastened to the side of the fermentor and covered with 2 inches of foam insulation.
 
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HutBrew

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Keep us updated with how the beer turns out @InspectorJon! I’m digging this thread and the different ways to use glucoamylase. I’ve been trying to find a way to make those dry lite beers, and save money on grain bills in the process.
 

hotbeer

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So…when you pitch a small beer on a yeast cake it might be done in 20 hours.
Depends on what you mean by done. And I'm only assuming you meant done fermenting since you didn't specify and I just jumped in without reading every post.

IMO, sure a beer might be fully fermented in 20 hours. However that doesn't mean it ready to bottle. Other stuff happens after the ferment is over. Some things take much longer time.

Though it all depends on your beer and what in fact you wish it to be and what other processes you might be willing or un-willing to do before getting it in the glass.
 
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InspectorJon

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Depends on what you mean by done. And I'm only assuming you meant done fermenting since you didn't specify and I just jumped in without reading every post.

IMO, sure a beer might be fully fermented in 20 hours. However that doesn't mean it ready to bottle. Other stuff happens after the ferment is over. Some things take much longer time.

Though it all depends on your beer and what in fact you wish it to be and what other processes you might be willing or un-willing to do before getting it in the glass.
It was bubbling hard in 1.5 hours post pitch. Krausen was up and gone in less than 20 hours after pitching. Gravity was measured at 1.008 42 hours post pitch. I don't normally sample this early but this is an experiment and I am curious. I thought it might be lower. I am hoping for a few points lower. I'll check again in a few days. If does not drop to at least 1.006 I think I will add some gluco to the fermentor. I'll let it sit for at least a week to "clean up" before I dry hop.
 
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InspectorJon

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7 days after brew day gravity is 1.006. I have swirled the yeast up a few times. Gravity sample tastes nice. Hazy pale straw color after sitting still for two days. I will soft crash to 45 °F in a couple days and hold for a day. Then I will raise up to 55 °F and dry hop for a day, then cold crash to low thirties for several days.
 
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