light or dark brown sugar for priming?

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DeRoux's Broux

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i forgot priming sugar last week at the homebrew shop and didnt realize it until i drove 1.5 hrs home. i've never used light or dark brown sugar for priming, but have read several recipes over the years that call for it, over regular priming sugar (like in ESB's, Porters, Stouts. yada yada yada). any feedback from somebody that's used it before? i brewed up an American Brown, and thought i'd give it a whirl. Comments?

i could ALWAYS order it via snail mail and get a couple other things i NEED......
 

ehedge20

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Depends on if you like the taste of molasses. I would stick with the light sugar.
 
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DeRoux's Broux

DeRoux's Broux

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kind of my thought's, but wanted to bounce it off some peeps. i save that for my pancakes, not my beer!
 

the_bird

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Why not just plain white table sugar? I've used that in place of corn sugar and I'll be damned if I can tell a difference. That's all the brown sugar is anyway, plus the molasses.
 
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DeRoux's Broux

DeRoux's Broux

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i'll just suck it up and get some priming sugar this weekend. thanks for the feedback!
 
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DeRoux's Broux

DeRoux's Broux

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i love my beer too much to cut corners. i'll hit the hbs while im in H-town this weekend and grab some priming sugar or light dme.....and won't be in such a hurry next time that i forget anything. D'OH!
 

beerme72

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Am I missing something here? Isn't "Priming Sugar" just simple table sugar? Using table sugar is the same thing, no?
 

emjay

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beerme72 said:
Am I missing something here? Isn't "Priming Sugar" just simple table sugar? Using table sugar is the same thing, no?
Priming sugar is whatever sugar you add after the primary fermentation in order to carbonate your beer. Depending on how loosely you use the term, it can even mean DME.

But most people use corn sugar AKA dextrose, a monosaccharide that is basically just glucose. Table sugar is sucrose, a disaccharide made up of a fructose molecule and a glucose molecule.

Many people find that sucrose/table sugar can sometimes contribute a somewhat cidery taste, and so prefer not to use it.
 

hts

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At 2/3 of a cup of white cane sugar per 5 gallon batch for priming-trust me--it's not gonna taste cidery. That's all I use and I'll be damned if I can tell the difference from corn sugar (or DME for that matter, except that DME leaves a krausen ring in the neck of your bottles, which is one reason I refuse to use it anymore for priming)
 

emjay

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hts said:
At 2/3 of a cup of white cane sugar per 5 gallon batch for priming-trust me--it's not gonna taste cidery. That's all I use and I'll be damned if I can tell the difference from corn sugar (or DME for that matter, except that DME leaves a krausen ring in the neck of your bottles, which is one reason I refuse to use it anymore for priming)
You're definitely right for the most part. Still, I only use table sugar with Belgian beers (in the boil as well) and I'm not about to try it out in a light lager or anything.
 

jonmohno

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Your wasting your gas money unless you stock up on more beer making inventory.You can use anything from honey to agave.Regular table sugar is just fine but if you must have priming sugar you can buy dextrose at healthfood stores maybe even supermarkets.That trip is not worth priming sugar. Just remember to find the right amount to use on a priming sugar calculator.
 

johnnybob

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All I ever use is white table sugar. It works just fine. Use a little less of it than you would corn sugar. Look at tastybrew.com for a priming sugar calculator. Incidentally, table sugar leaves no aftertaste that I can detect.
 

Revvy

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Why are you chickenning out about using brown sugar. It's great for dark beers/ And to get the flavor the darker sugar the better. It's great especially for pumpkin ales. In fact a few commercial pumpkin ales are primed with brown sugar, and taste great.

I've primed with all manner of interesting things, including date palm mollasses for a sri lankin stout, and have flavored priming sugar by boiling ginger with it for my ginger snap brown ale, and dried chilli peppers for my chocolate mole porter. You can use just about anything, even fruit juice.

I give info on priming with alternative primers including fruit juice, and other sugars in my bottling stickey- Scroll to the lower half of this post.

Alternative priming sugars, or flavoring your priming solution are great ways to add another level of flavor to your beers.
 

drkaeppel

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I concur with you pro-table sugar people. I have used nothing but, and had excellent results so far.
 

PT Ray

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I'm not only pro-sucrose but anti-dextrose. I used the last of my dextrose about 5 years ago and have been using table sugar for all my brewing sugar needs. I've even used it as 30% of the fermentables in an adjunct lager without off flavors.
 
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DeRoux's Broux

DeRoux's Broux

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haha! im not wasting gas, or chickening out. 1.) going to Houston to see the Avett Brothers tonight, so I can hit the hbs tomorrow or on my way home sunday. 2.) the light brown sugar might be a good fit for the american brown i have in the primary.
it doesn't help that im a creature of habit, but had often read to that the table sugar might give some off flavors, so i was leary to try it. and since im not in a bind and ready to bottle, i'm prob gonna go with what i know.
 

Revvy

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it doesn't help that im a creature of habit, but had often read to that the table sugar might give some off flavors, so i was leary to try it. and since im not in a bind and ready to bottle, i'm prob gonna go with what i know.
That's actually another one of those brewer's myths that new brewer's tend to repeat over and over like canon, without full understanding what they're talking about.

Too much sugar, in a recipe can give off off flavors, or make a beer cidery, but we're talking about someone who wants to bump up the alcohol on his 6 pounds of extract beer by adding another 6 pounds of table sugar to it.

That whole thing about not adding sugar or else you make "cidery" beer is one of those little "chestnuts" that noobs repeat without thinking deeper about it. When we talk about it being a bad thing, is when the ration of sugar to malt quite high, like frat boys trying to bump up their coopers can...yeah that's a bad thing...but we're not talking about that here, we're talking about an acceptable brewing process for many styles of beer...and in your case just about priming your beer.

I mean do you like Belgian beers? Are they crappy tasting because of the simple sugars that are added? If you like them, that's how they achieved the beer you like.

Belgian beers are a style that are supposed to have simple sugars in it. It raises the abv, but it also cuts down on some of the body, promotes the formation of certain flavors and helps dry the beer out.

A pound or two, or in your case 5 ounces for priming isn't going to affect the beer in a negative way, especially if the recipe calls for. Even a cooper's which people want to deride, or some others suggest replacing with malt extract, is really meant to have exactly the amount of sugar the recipe might call for. But if you willy nilly add a couple more pounds to it, that's another story.

That sri lankin stout had 2.2 pounds of Jaggery in it, and was primed with date palm molasses....one of my beer judge buddies said it was one of the best beers of mine he's tasted.

It's about balance in a recipe, the correct amount of sugar in a recipe is fine, and often serves an important purpose.

Please, don't be one of those brewers who just repeats what he hears. Look around, do some reading, do some critical thinking about stuff, for example "how come belgian beers have sugar added and they don't taste bad or cidery?" Just don't repeat those brewing chestnuts you hear. Most of them turn out to be either wrong, have a different context to them than what it's repeated about, or are a little more complex than a mere statement like "Adding sugar makes your beer cidery."

:mug:
 

coastwx

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I used brown sugar in an choc oatmeal milk stout with good results. It's 6 months old and wonderful.
 
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