Let It Breath?

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GoodTruble

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I swear many of my beers taste a tad off on the first sip, but if I just let them sit 5-10 minutes, the flavor improves a lot (even when I don't drink during that 5-10 minutes =c) )

I know wine drinking friends who will often suggest "let it breath a bit" when they open a bottle.

Is it just in my head, or can the beer's taste actually improve by just letting it sit in the glass a bit? -These were all bottled beers, btw. Or maybe the flavors just come out more as it warms up a bit?
 

hotbeer

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I always liked beer on the warmer side of what many serve and drink it at today. Perhaps part of it comes from me going to Germany on a school trip when 16 yo and getting to legally drink some great beers at the warmer temps they serve beer at in Europe.
 

Golddiggie

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What temperature are you chilling your beer to? IME, even a few degrees (F) can effect the flavor/sensory effects when drinking beer. It also effects tastes of mead.

I keep my kegs at ~41F (or 40-42F via the keezer controller) since they're also styles from the British Isles.

Another factor that could be part of things is if your beer is carbonated in the higher range of a style. Or over carbonated if you bottle and just used the included packet of priming sugar.
 

rburrelli

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Are you drinking from the bottle or pouring in a glass? It makes a huge difference IMHO.
 
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GoodTruble

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I'm always pouring homebrew into a glass (-I'm not a caveman =c) ). -And the fridge temp holding the bottles is probably 35 F.

So it's probably just the warming effect. It's been most notable in Belgian beers, a triple and two different saisons.
 

Snuffy

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Letting a bottle breathe gives it time to release gasses and aromas that could change your perception of flavor.
 

Dancy

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Yes, warming it a bit allows the flavors to be more prominent and melded. Ice cold beer is great for flavorless beer (and worse, in a frosted mug!!!!) but good beer is better served a bit warmer, depending on the style.
+1 on this. I recently started brewing Belgian Dark Strong Ales and detect a significant flavor difference after it sits 10-15 minutes. More nuanced flavors come through. I’ve noticed this with stouts I drink as well.
 
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