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Lager pitching rates

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JuanKenobi

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I'm brewing a maibock, but I don't have true lagering capability. So, I'm using Wyeast 2112 and will be fermenting around 60 degrees. I'll be making a starter according to Mr. Malty, and I'm wondering if I need to use lager or ale pitching rates. Would love some experienced advice.
 
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JuanKenobi

JuanKenobi

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Yeah. I noticed the hybrid option after I posted the thread.

I guess what I'm pondering is why the need to pitch so much more with lager yeast. I never thought about it until now. People always mention the temperature, but it seems like it's more about the bottom fermentation than the temp.
 

MachineShopBrewing

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Its mostly due to temp. You want an active enough fermentation to scrub out the sulfur and also enough cells to keep esters to a minimum.
 
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JuanKenobi

JuanKenobi

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This is where I get confused. If it is mostly due to temp, then why do I need nearly double the pitch rate for a hybrid yeast as I would use for an ale yeast that I'm fermenting at the same temp? Also, if it's about temp, then why doesn't Mr. Malty have a fermentation temp field?
 

MachineShopBrewing

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This is where I get confused. If it is mostly due to temp, then why do I need nearly double the pitch rate for a hybrid yeast as I would use for an ale yeast that I'm fermenting at the same temp? Also, if it's about temp, then why doesn't Mr. Malty have a fermentation temp field?
Give me a couple weeks to answer that. I'm only through the first two chapters of his Yeast book. All of the answers to your questions are in there I am sure.
 

TurkCowan

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I regularly brew lagers although I have no experience with fermenting them at 60F. If you want to use 60F then go ahead and let us know what you find out. Otherwise, I would suggest that it's really not that difficult to keep your primary at around 50F, especially if you're in a cold area. After you brew, put your primary outside until it hits ~50F. At the same time put out a couple of plastic bottles of water. After it hits 50, bring it inside, pitch, put it and the frozen bottles in a box and cover with some blankets. You can switch out bottles every couple of days (kind of a pita, but not really) and you have a true lagering ferm temp. This only works in the winter but seeing as it's February, it looks like you have some time left.

FWIW, I do the exact opposite to lager (keep it outisde in the freezing and put warm bottles from inside my house in the box to keep it from freezing)
 
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