Lactose and Maltodextrin in a stout

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RyPA

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I will be brewing the below recipe within the next 1-2 weeks. I ordered it with an optional addition of 4oz of maltodextrin for body. I am debating on either adding lactose, or switching the maltodextrin for lactose. A few of the beers I buy from my local brewery, Kane, have lactose and I really like those beers. Especially a milk stout that they do around St. Patricks day, but I am not sure if its lactose or maltodextrin that they use as its not stated on the can, but I assume lactose since they call it a milk stout? They do specifically say lactose on the IPA cans... if it's not specified then is it maltodextrin since it will not affect people being there are people who are lactose intolerant and not maltodextrin intolerant?


With this being a chocolate stout, I am not sure how much sweetness the chocolate will bring to the table. I will also be adding a toasted coconut flavoring. I think a touch of sweetness would be appreciated, in addition to some body. Is it ok to do some of both? Or will lactose alone give some sweetness and body. I would like the same body as Guinness.

From what I've read, 1/2 to 3/4 lb of lactose per 5 gallons seems to be the sweet spot, no pun intended.
 
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Jag75

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I use 1# of lactose in my chocolate milk stout . I've never used maltodextrin before so I can't say. However the lactose works great . I love marris otter in the grain bill as well . You can't go wrong with lactose .
 
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RyPA

RyPA

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I use 1# of lactose in my chocolate milk stout . I've never used maltodextrin before so I can't say. However the lactose works great . I love marris otter in the grain bill as well . You can't go wrong with lactose .
Do you get body out of it, or is it only sweetness? And you consistently use 1# on a 5gal batch with good results?
 

Jag75

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Do you get body out of it, or is it only sweetness? And you consistently use 1# on a 5gal batch with good results?
It's a 5.5 gallon batch sorry. Yes I always use 1#. It has great body. I use Maris otter , flaked oats , crystal , chocolate malt and Roasted barley. It also gets help by being put on gas blend
 
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dmtaylor

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Hardly anybody who knows what they are doing uses maltodextrin. It adds body but no sweetness. What you probably want, which is used all over the place, is lactose, which adds both body and sweetness. You've got the amounts right, 1/2 to 3/4 lb per 5 gallons is exactly what I recommend.
 

Bobby_M

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I don't get much sweetness from either of them but I do think lactose tastes terrible. They are primarily mouthfeel enhancers. I wouldn't add either of them to a beer until verifying if thicker mouthfeel is needed as they can be added directly into the keg after making a quick syrup. You can simulate the effects by raising your mash temperature. If you miss your mark, THEN add the enhancer. If you add it to the boil, and have attenuation problems you can end up with a beer with too much body.
 

deuc224

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A lot of people use Maltodextrin because the brewmaster who did the black is beautiful stout talked about how he used it so now everyone uses it. its not a bad thing its just another way to addbody, i still use carapils just cuz i havent had the courage to use maltodextrin in my brews until i read up on it a litle ore but its definitely on my to do list.
 
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RyPA

RyPA

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I decided to go with 1# of lactose as it seems to be the most common for milk stouts. I have had IPA's with lactose from a brewery near me and they taste great so I'm going to give it a shot, if I don't like it then it's a lesson learned for next time.
 
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RyPA

RyPA

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Today is brew day and I am on the fence for when to add lactose. I am considering following Bobby's advice and exclude it from the boil, and then at kegging, give it a taste and add if needed.

I assume I could boil just enough water, dissolve the 1# of lactose in it, and then add it to the keg? This is just for sanitation, or am I ok to just pour the powder into freshly racked beer?

Thanks
 

Jag75

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Today is brew day and I am on the fence for when to add lactose. I am considering following Bobby's advice and exclude it from the boil, and then at kegging, give it a taste and add if needed.

I assume I could boil just enough water, dissolve the 1# of lactose in it, and then add it to the keg? This is just for sanitation, or am I ok to just pour the powder into freshly racked beer?

Thanks
I've never tried just adding to the keg . I've always added to the last 5-10 minutes of the boil .

People also put it in the fermenter as well . Imo the boil is easiest as all you do is dump it in and stir .
 
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RyPA

RyPA

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There's no risk of affecting the fermentation process?
 

Jag75

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There's no risk of affecting the fermentation process?
I can't say there's no risk. Imo anytime you add something to beer there's a risk. That's why I said I stick with the end of boil. It's just a no brainer to me.
 
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