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Lack of Yeast--Undercarbonation?

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Toilet Rocker

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Hey guys--I just started this year, so I've only 2 batches to speak of. My first batch, a brown ale came out way undercarbonated. The second, an oatmeal stout, came out a bit better. I spoke with my local HB shop and was told that as they conditioned at a good temp and were not overfilled, the problem was probly too much yeast settling out. I was advised to stir up the cake a tad when racking to the bottling bucket so there's something to eat the primer (the first batch was quite sweet). This seems to have worked for the stout. Is this the best method? I read about adding a packet (or less) of rehydrated yeast at bottling. This would remove off-flavors from dead yeast. I'm about to bottle a licorice porter and want to be safe. Thanks.

First post--looking forward to many more.
 

DeRoux's Broux

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welcome and glad you stumbled on to us!

the HBS rec sounds good to me. just drag the racking cane along the bottom of the secondary for about 3-4 inches when you start the siphon process. that should give you enough yeast to carbonate. now, if it was a lager, that had been lagering for 4-8 weeks, then i would add a packet of yeast at bottling.
how much priming sugar are you using? most the recipes call for 3/4 cup priming sugar to one cup of boiling water to make a simple syrup. stir to disolve, than add to priming bucket, stirring in easy, not spalshing to add O2 to the finished beer.
when i bottled i would add a little bit at a time as the bottling bucket filled up, to help distribute evenly through the beer. i'd give it an easy stir after adding. let the bottles sit at room temp for 2 weeks, but 3-4 is even better.

hope this helps and i'm sure these guy's will have some other great tips/ideas for your question!
 

uglygoat

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i used to just dump the syrup in the bucket then rack atop it, but deroux's distibution method gave me even better results when it came to carbonation :)

try and drag some yeast up like has been said. i'd also like to plug tennlandsalior's method of two weeks in the primary, then right to the bottle... it may not work for every style, but for bitters and pales, i've had excellent results come time for bottle aging...
 

heLLbent

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Maybe I have been waiting longer than necesary, it seems like it always takes me atleast three weeks from brew day to bottling day.

I see the little globs of yeasties popping up to the top and releasing c02 and I figure its not ready, am I wrong?

Just bought 12 cornies and plan to start kegging, I sure dont want to be waiting any longer than I have to, thanks, Cheers.
 
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Toilet Rocker

Toilet Rocker

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Thanks for your thoughts. I used 3/4 C dextrose in 1 pint boiling H2O, let it cool down, then dumped it in the bottling bucket. I syphoned from the fermenter directly into the primed bucket (I kept the end of the hose submerged to prevent splashing), then gave a quick, but neat stir. I'll try DeRoux's Broux's technique this time.
 

DeRoux's Broux

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1 pint of water is probably too much, and diluting the priming sugar? try one cup of water next time, and it should be adequate.

heLLbent, patience is a virtue in home brewing. : ^ ) three weeks is about right for an average ale. mine usually go 5-7 days in primary, 7-10 days in secondary, 2-3 days to chill, 2-3 days to force carbonate (no bottle washing for me!!), next day imbibe!!!
 
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