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Labeling bottles

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AHammer16

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Does any one know of a way to paint a label on glass bottles, like corona bottles, so the label doesn't wash off every time you clean the bottles?
 

ian

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those types of bottles are screen printed, much like a T-shirt. Except that since its a cylindrical surface you need a special kind of press that will roll the substrate (the bottle) along as the screen and squeegee come into contact with the surface of the bottle.
 
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AHammer16

AHammer16

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I was going to make a stencil out of heavy mil plastic and paint or spray it on. Does any one know anybody that has done this. How about what paint to use.
 

ian

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I don't know what kind of paint would hold up to repeated washings and sanitizing. The printed bottles use a plastisol ink that is cured as it comes off the press making it quite durable.
 
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AHammer16

AHammer16

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Found multiple kinds of paint designed for glass. I will try freehand and a home made stencil. They say it will stand up to washing.
 

Sir Sudster

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I'd say try a Stain Glass supply house. I think they have stains for painting on glass.
 

JillC25

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you will probably need an oil-based paint of some sort... water based will come right off if you are planning to clean them for the next round of brew. Getting it to look like the paint on a corona bottle is going to be a bit tricky... but good luck! take a pic.
 

Oðrerir

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What do you guys use to make your labels (software or other)? Are there some labels at Office Depot type stores? My 1st batch is fermenting and seems to be going well (woohoo!)
 

kenmc

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theres loads of posts on thjis in other threads u may find something useful. i use gimp to design it, print them on plain a4 paper and use polybond to stick them to the bottles. comes right off easy when refilling.../
 

DuallyBrew

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I design my using Gimp and print them on full sheets of Avery #5124.

This fit my 22oz bottles just right.
 

brewhead

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interesting thread - i've never labeled my bottles but always wanted to have a paint stencil that would withstand repeated washings. i wonder if the paint on corona's are aplied via static
 
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AHammer16

AHammer16

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Got the paint in the mail saturday. tried a small design on 1 bottle. they suggest to heat set after 24 hours of drying. i did this and the paint will not come off. kick ass!! willpost when i make my stencil and make up a few bottles.
 

brewhead

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what brand of paint where did you order it?

post pix
 

Punn

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I just used photoshop on mine. I can't draw so no painting for me!



I print 10 on a page, use Avery 8165 full page sticker paper. came out good
 
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AHammer16

AHammer16

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Liquitex Acrylic Glossies
Glossies are water-based acrylic enamels used in many types of decorative painting. They are formulated to adhere to slick, non-porous and non-oily surfaces such as glass, wood, ceramic, plastic, primed metal, tiles, stoneware, china, enamelware, and walls.

Colors are lightfast. They mix beautifully to achieve any hue, and dry to a glossy, enamel-like finish. Thin them with water or high-luster acrylic varnish.

Although Glossies contain no toxic ingredients, and conform to ASTM D 4236, they are not recommended for use on surfaces that come in direct contact with food and beverages. Finished pieces can be cleaned with soap and water and a soft cloth, but should not be cleaned with strong chemicals and abrasives.

Glossies are packaged in 2 oz (60 ml) flip-top jars, which are easily resealed to maintain the freshness of the paint.

Liquitex Glossies Set — Six 2 oz (60 ml) jars, including Yellow, Bright Blue, Red, White, Black, and Metallic Gold.



2 oz
60 ml




(enlarge)





Glossies can be air-dried or heat-set. To heat-set, bake pieces at 325°F (162°C) for 30-40 minutes in a kitchen oven, for a hard, ceramic-like finish. Allow the piece to warm up and cool down gradually with the oven.

Glossies have a thicker consistency than that of other decorative paints. For best results, use a soft natural-fiber brush, such as a red sable watercolor brush, or a soft synthetic-fiber brush, such as a golden taklon detailer.
 

curtk

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If your interested in another alternative you can try laser engraving, which my company does. It'll never come off. Possibilities are unlimited as far as what you want, we can even do portraits. Will work within your budget. Let me know if your interested.

Curt
 

Jester4176

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curtk said:
If your interested in another alternative you can try laser engraving, which my company does. It'll never come off. Possibilities are unlimited as far as what you want, we can even do portraits. Will work within your budget. Let me know if your interested.

Curt
Along these lines, couldn't you affix a metal stencil to the bottle and maybe use a sandblaster or something to etch the glass permantly? Just thinking out loud here...Feel free to ignore my Dunkel induced ramblings.:drunk:
 

ian

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Jester4176 said:
Along these lines, couldn't you affix a metal stencil to the bottle and maybe use a sandblaster or something to etch the glass permantly? Just thinking out loud here...Feel free to ignore my Dunkel induced ramblings.:drunk:
I have thought about this. But I sandblast glasses (see my sig) using a cut vinyl stencil. They're a one time use for each stencil but hold up well. I have pretty much decided not to etch my bottles as I give a lot of beer away and I'd hate to put that much effort into the bottle only to lose it. . .:eek:

But, on the other hand, the person who ends up with the bottle has a little token of the awesome homebrew that I made! :rockin: (my first time using that smiley)
 

Prost!

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Jester4176 said:
Along these lines, couldn't you affix a metal stencil to the bottle and maybe use a sandblaster or something to etch the glass permantly? Just thinking out loud here...Feel free to ignore my Dunkel induced ramblings.:drunk:
I'd be concerned about jeopardizing the stength integrity of the bottle. Wouldn't want to make bombs.
 

ian

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You would really only need to etch a to a very shallow depth. I'm sure that the bottle could take and still retain the pressure created by carbonation. I may have to do one as a test though.
 
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