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L6-30P adapter

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Jtvann

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Hey guys,

I'm about to buy a brew boss system which comes with a L6-30P plug. I plan on plugging it into my 30 amp dryer receptical. The house I currently live in has the older 3 prong receptical. I will soon be moving to a house that uses a newer 4 prong dryer receptical.

I'm not a fan of cutting the end of the cord on my new system ... multiple times. Wondering if one of you would be kind enough to post a link to an adapter that I can use.

Thanks
 

doug293cz

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What are you doing about GCFI protection? You need this since by definition a brewery is a wet area.

Brew on :mug:
 
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Jtvann

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Well, I think if you just google 4-prong to 3-prong dryer adapter you might find a lot of options, such as this:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/AC-WORK...ale-Connector-Adapter-S10301430-018/305439341

Yeah, I did Google it. Came up with the same results that you just posted. That plugs obviously not a female L6-30P. Using Google, the results have been mixed. I could have possibly found it on my own already, but so many of the outlets look the same, but are rated for different amperage (sometimes without listing it) I figured I'd ask someone who knew definitively and could post an accurate link.
 

TheMarkTM

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If it is an L6-30P twist-lock (that's what the L is for) than you're probably not going to find a ready-built adapter. It's pretty easy to wire one, just buy a dryer replacement cord that matches the outlet in your house and wire it to a L6-30 cord end, they sell both at nearly every hardware store. You're basically making a short extension cord with the correct style ends for your situation.

One issue you'll have is that a standard 3-prong dryer outlet isn't grounded. The two angled lugs are the two poles of the 240 v, and the L shaped one is the neutral, not an equipment ground. You might be able to come up with an improvised solution by mating the ground from some other nearby outlet (there is probably a grounded 120 v nearby for the washer). I did this once for a welder in a house I was renting, but it's clearly not ideal. On a 6-30 socket, there are two "hot" poles for the power and it doesn't matter which is which, they're both the gold (rarely black) screws. The other screw should be green and line up with the large bent lug, and that's the ground. You could just leave the ground disconnected, theoretically it isn't needed for operation, but it's really not safe.

A 4 prong dryer outlet has a ground, it's the D shaped one opposite the L shaped lug. When you move you can use that safely without any trouble. Just connect the two hot lugs to the black and red wires (rarely both black), then the ground to the green wire. Leave the white wire disconnected and ideally trim it short enough that it won't be able to short to any of the other poles and put a wire nut/tape on it to cap it.

Also since the topic of safety came up, when water and electricity mix you really need a GFI. I know some of their systems come with one, but if you didn't get option then you should have an electrician install one. You can have them install a GFI breaker for the dryer if you really want to keep it cheap, and you could just swap the appliances when you brew. Seeing how much you are sinking in to brewing if you're buying one of those systems, I'd recommend ponying up and having a circuit run to where you want to brew with the correct outlet configuration on the end. You will never regret having it done the right way.
 
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Jtvann

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Thanks for the reply Mark.

I'm looking to have a 50 amp gfci breaker installed at the new house if possible. Not to give away to much personal info, but I may not be allowed to have new breakers installed.

There is an open space in the breaker panel opposite of an existing 50amp line for one to be installed. I just have to wait and see what I'm allowed to do.

Just trying to work within my current bounds and be safe about it. I get that it is a really cheap fix and easy to do to cut the line and wire up a new plug, but spending a few dollars on a ready made adapter makes me personally feel better.
 

TheMarkTM

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That adapter from Amazon looks like the right ends, but like I said the 10-30 outlets aren't grounded, so it might just be connecting the equipment ground to the neutral, which is a little sketchy. Probably never be an issue, but not exactly kosher. That GFI looks like the business, if you don't have a GFI breaker installed than that should do the trick.
 

TheMarkTM

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Right, I didn't mean to say you should cut the cord on the new equipment. You can just get a replacement dryer cord, like this one http://a.co/d/dg0sutE and wire it to a L6-30R end like this one http://a.co/d/86kJcEP and make your own. That said, for the $10 more to have the nice molded one and not need to mess around if you're not an electrical nerd like me, it seems totally worth it to get the pre-made one you found.
 
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Jtvann

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Thanks for all the advice. I'm tracking on the older 3 prong not being grounded. Looks like by far my cheapest and best option is having a 50 amp gfci breaker installed along with a L6-30P receptical. Will just have to cross my fingers.
 
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