Kolsch Lagering question

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ArcaneXor

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I am currently fermenting a batch of a "fake" Kolsch in my Mr. Beer at about 65 deg C in a picnic cooler. Despite being made from Mr. Beer ingredients, it surprisingly does what a Kolsch is supposed to do from what I have read, which is smell like sulfur, have persistent Kraeusen and yeast that just doesn't seem to want to settle (despite being brewed with generic dry yeast).

My question pertains to lagering once the primary fermentation is done (keeping in mind I do not have the option of racking to a secondary at this point). I see my options as follows:

1.) Stick the whole Mr. Beer in the fridge for a month, take it out for a couple of days to give the remaining yeast a chance to recover, then prime and bottle and let carbonate at room temperature. My major concern is leaving the beer in the Mr. Beer keg for that long, since it doesn't have a proper airlock. So oxidation and autolysis is what I am worried about in this scenario.

2.) Prime, bottle and stick in the fridge immediately. After a month, take the bottles out of the fridge, shake them up to rouse the yeast and store at room temp for a couple of weeks to get the carbonation done. What I am worried about here is getting insufficient carbonation is case all the yeast are killed by the extensive refrigeration.

Any advice would be appreciated. And yes, I am looking forward to getting some real equipment early next year so that I can use proper brewing procedures.
 

cheezydemon

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A Kolsch isn't typically a lager is it? If you want it to clear, I would bottle and carb it and then put it in the fridge for a month if you want.
 

Triathlete

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I actually talked to someone at Austin Home Brew Supply today and they explained to me that a Kolsch is actually an Alt bier. Basically an old school Ale, and Lagering came about after the Kolsch. So typically Kolsch's are an Ale, but I guess it could always depend on the yeast you used.

I am new to this as well, just restating what I was told. Good luck.
 

BierMuncher

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ArcaneXor said:
2.) Prime, bottle and stick in the fridge immediately. After a month, take the bottles out of the fridge, shake them up to rouse the yeast and store at room temp for a couple of weeks to get the carbonation done. What I am worried about here is getting insufficient carbonation is case all the yeast are killed by the extensive refrigeration.
Prime, bottle and store at around 72 degrees fo 21 days to allow carbonation.

THen, when they're carbonated, chill them for 2-3 weeks and allow the yeast to fall out and the beer to clear.

Note...Mr Beer is not well known for producing clear beers...so buy some opaque mugs for serving. :mug:
 

brewt00l

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Kolsch is not alt...Cologne is not Dusseldorf! Alts are amber ales with distinct malt & hop flavors where as Kolsch style beers are soft/light lager-esque beers.


alt:
http://www.bjcp.org/styles04/Category7.html#style7C

Kolsch
http://www.bjcp.org/styles04/Category6.html#style6C

The guidelines describe a Kolsch:
"A clean, crisp, delicately balanced beer usually with very subtle fruit flavors and aromas. Subdued maltiness throughout leads to a pleasantly refreshing tang in the finish. To the untrained taster easily mistaken for a light lager, a somewhat subtle pilsner, or perhaps a blonde ale."


Jamil has a great show on Kolsch style beers and Alts where he discusses brewing techniques including lagering your kolsch and fermentation temps:
http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/archive/Jamil06-19-06.mp3
 

malkore

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brewt00l said:
Kolsch is not alt...Cologne is not Dusseldorf! Alts are amber ales with distinct malt & hop flavors where as Kolsch style beers are soft/light lager-esque beers.


alt:
http://www.bjcp.org/styles04/Category7.html#style7C

Kolsch
http://www.bjcp.org/styles04/Category6.html#style6C

The guidelines describe a Kolsch:
"A clean, crisp, delicately balanced beer usually with very subtle fruit flavors and aromas. Subdued maltiness throughout leads to a pleasantly refreshing tang in the finish. To the untrained taster easily mistaken for a light lager, a somewhat subtle pilsner, or perhaps a blonde ale."


Jamil has a great show on Kolsch style beers and Alts where he discusses brewing techniques including lagering your kolsch and fermentation temps:
http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/archive/Jamil06-19-06.mp3

my cousin-in-law is living in Germany right now. Kolsch is their regional beer, and 'Altbier is ****e!' is how she often greets me.

Kolsch yeast is a little cooler fermenting, and not very ester prone. I actually made my Mocktoberfest with Wyeast kolsch strain because its so clean fermenting.
The 'cool for an ale' temp tolerance and the clean profile is why it can be so easily mistaken for a lager.
That and cold crashing in secondary (to lager temps) is one of the better ways to clear this style of beer.
 

brewhead

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kolsch is a lazy man's lager yeast. i recently kegged 15 gallons of black widow kolsch that i annually make around this time of year. i had it in the fermenter at around 50 degrees which is a bit cold for the yeast itself but it slow fermented for a steady two weeks. kolsch yeast is a pseudo lager yeast that will get you similar results without lagering. it does take some time to clear and i would recommend either cold conditioning it in a keg, filtering if you are set up to do so, or using geletin finings.
 
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