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Kettle trub vs. No trub for Under 130 degree no chill brewing

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jcorn

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I boil and chill in a little different way. It is a "No chill once chilled to under 130 degrees" way of brewing. It normally takes me around 12-16 hours to reach my room temperature yeast pitching temps after I pour ALL of the wort from the kettle into my bucket fermenter. I pour in all of the kettle trub and that brings me to my next question.

Back in the day I would pour all of my wort including kettle trub into my fermenter after doing the typical 20 minute or so immersion chill to room temperature. I have noticed new things since making the transition to this new "immersion chill to only under 130 degrees and pour, sit and wait for room temperature" way. For one: since doing this new way my trub cake is alot larger than before (even before pithing yeast) I have read the articles of kettle trub beers vs. Non kettle trub beers and I think my scenario differs a little. By doing such a long chill am I creating a large trub cake sue to the slow chill? I have read about hot break entering your beers. Would this slow chill afyer 130 create a hot break?

Am I hurting myself by not removing the wort from this large kettle trub cake? I am happy with my beers but have noticed that if I make a 10 gallon batch and split into two different 5 gallon batches that the one that was first poured out of the kettle (I sanitize and use a pitcher to pitch out my wort) the first 5 gallons removed tastes alot cleaner than the bottom of the kettles 5 gallons provides. Both come out very clear with no haze.
 
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jcorn

jcorn

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Does anyone do this particular style? I enjoy it be because I can no chill but not worry about dms because it is under 130 degrees.
 

brew_ny

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in the winter here in New York I just turn off my kettle put a lid on it and let it cool, when it is cool I put it in

my fermenter and pitch my yeast when it is at the right temperature

I did this all last winter and it worked great

S_M
 

jahdub

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Are you chilling to 130 in your kettle, then going to the bucket, or chilling to room temp and into the bucket?

If you're pouring into the bucket at 130, I would imagine less break material would settle than would be the case if you'd chilled to room temp prior to pouring your wort into the bucket.
 

brew_ny

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Are you chilling to 130 in your kettle, then going to the bucket, or chilling to room temp and into the bucket?

If you're pouring into the bucket at 130, I would imagine less break material would settle than would be the case if you'd chilled to room temp prior to pouring your wort into the bucket.
for me I am going to room temp then into the fermenter

S_M
 
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jcorn

jcorn

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Are you chilling to 130 in your kettle, then going to the bucket, or chilling to room temp and into the bucket?

If you're pouring into the bucket at 130, I would imagine less break material would settle than would be the case if you'd chilled to room temp prior to pouring your wort into the bucket.
I go straight to my bucket under 130. Just pour it right in. No worries on hot side aeration.
 

jahdub

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I'm not talking about hot side aeration, either. When waiting til 70F more trub is going to settle than at 130F.
 
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jcorn

jcorn

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I may start filtering out the hot break by lining my bucket with a paint strainer and pouring into that. Allow the cold break to stay later on.

I didnt mean to sound like I was pinpointing hot side aeration. I was just kind of adding it in for the desceiption of my process.
 
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