Kentucky Common Ale

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delcosansgluten

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I've wanted to try brewing a cream ale for sometime and decided that a Kentucky Common Ale is going to be my first foray into this style. I want to also try Grouse's new Pale Oat malt as I've heard oats add creaminess to beer so I'm hoping it will compliment the cream ale style. Here is my planned grain bill, appreciate everyone's insights and feedback.

  • 4 lbs Biscuit Rice
  • 3 lbs Pale Rice
  • 3 lbs Bob's Red Mill Corn Grits
  • 3 lbs Pale Millet
  • 2 lbs Pale Oat Malt
  • 0.75 lbs Caramel Millet 120L
  • 2 oz Cluster Hops
  • 1 sachet Lallemand Koln Yeast
 

AlexKay

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  • Here's Weikert on Kentucky Common. He uses chocolate rye; I've never used chocolate millet, but maybe it's a reasonable substitute? Anyhow, I think you want/need something roasted in there.
  • You've got 4 different kinds of base malt. I'm always in favor of simplifying, so maybe just the pale millet and the oat malt?
  • You probably already know this, but if the grits aren't cooked already, you'll need a cereal mash.
  • Lallemand Köln is a great yeast for this.
 
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delcosansgluten

delcosansgluten

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  • Here's Weikert on Kentucky Common. He uses chocolate rye; I've never used chocolate millet, but maybe it's a reasonable substitute? Anyhow, I think you want/need something roasted in there.
  • You've got 4 different kinds of base malt. I'm always in favor of simplifying, so maybe just the pale millet and the oat malt?
  • You probably already know this, but if the grits aren't cooked already, you'll need a cereal mash.
  • Lallemand Köln is a great yeast for this.
Hi Alex, thanks for your feedback. I have some dark roasted rice I can use to add, thanks for pointing that out. Do you know if Bob's Red Mill Grits are cooked already?
 

AlexKay

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Hi Alex, thanks for your feedback. I have some dark roasted rice I can use to add, thanks for pointing that out. Do you know if Bob's Red Mill Grits are cooked already?
Generally, if something doesn't describe itself as "instant" or "pre-gelatinized" or "torrified," it's probably not pre-cooked and it's going to need a cereal mash.
 

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Here's a great, totally authentic historical recipe of Kentucky Common Ale as it was brewed in 1912:


It's in my Beers-To-Brew-List, will probably brew it in the spring.
43% of Maize and 12 IBUs promise a nice, sweet and very quaffable beer.
 

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I've heard oats add creaminess to beer so I'm hoping it will compliment the cream ale style.
They do.
Along with that, Malted Oats (unlike Unmalted Oats) add a particular flavour to the beer that's usually described as "berry-like", and which I perceive as "perfumey". In a light beer, that "berry-like" twang may become pretty prominent and unpleasant, that's why Oat Malt is a very rare component in light beers' grists. If you're set on adding Oats for body, I'd suggest using unmalted varieties as they don't bring any flavours of their own with them.
 
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Miraculix

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They do.
Along with that, Malted Oats (unlike Unmalted Oats) add a particular flavour to the beer that's usually described as "berry-like", and which I percept as "perfumey". In a light beer, that "berry-like" twang may become pretty prominent and unpleasant, that's why Oat Malt is a very rare component in light beers' grists. If you're set on adding Oats for body, I'd suggest using unmalted varieties as they don't bring any flavours of their own with them.
No they don't :D.


Who's right?


If you add oats in a "normal" (10% or something like that) amount, there will be no impact on creamyness or mouthfeel or however you'd call it. However they are great for yeast health due to elevated levels of certain fatty acids. But on the other hand, that's the reason why they are bad for foam, once a certain amount has been reached. 10% is fine though.

If you want to impact viscosity, use rye. Malted or unmalted, doesn't matter.

Edit: sorry, didn't realize we're talking gluten free here. So rye is not an option.
 

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No they don't :D.


Who's right?
It depends of what we mean under the term of Body.
Oat is not such a prominent body-builder as Rye or unmalted Barley are, still I'm sure I would pass a blind triangle test of distinguishing a beer with 10% of Oat in it. Probably, Silkiness and Slickiness would be better definitions for the impact that Oats bring about.
 

Miraculix

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It depends of what we mean under the term of Body.
Oat is not such a prominent body-builder as Rye or unmalted Barley are, still I'm sure I would pass a blind triangle test of distinguishing a beer with 10% of Oat in it. Probably, Silkiness and Slickiness would be better definitions for the impact that Oats bring about.
I thought the same, till I did a blind test.

Nope, honestly no difference.

In case you didn't read this one, highly recommended:
 

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I tried Oat Malt in my several brews (10-15%, and 85% in an Oatwine once - which came out a really slicky thing).
Always tasted it and never liked it. That's why I don't use it anymore, except in Kuits (where I don't like it either but I have to use up my surplus of Oat malt somehow).
That's a nice article, I read and saved it when I was researching my Oatwine project.
 

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I did an oatwine I rather liked, though it came out more an imperial oatmeal stout. Now, ryewine—that was like motor oil. >10% ABV and still undrinkable.
 

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My secret ingredient to "grainwines" was adding 15% sugar for thinning the wort.
Both Rye and Oat wines came out very strong and perfectly drinkable although slicky still.
I liked my Rye Wine more than Oat Wine.
 

Miraculix

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My secret ingredient to "grainwines" was adding 15% sugar for thinning the wort.
Both Rye and Oat wines came out very strong and perfectly drinkable although slicky still.
I liked my Rye Wine more than Oat Wine.
I found that your recommendation of a long beta glucan step ( 30 minutes at about 55 C Edit: it was 45 C, if I remember correctly) helps to reduce the rye slickness greatly. My last rye beer is just slightly thicker than normal at 7% abv and with above 20% rye. Unfortunately, the Voss twang which was initially almost absent, developed in the bottle and now it really is a kveik beer. It is still good to drink, but voss apparently is voss.
 
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( 30 minutes at about 55 C, if I remember correctly)
Actually what I employed was 30 minutes around 45C (Beta-glucan rest is performed at lower than 48C, higher than that we enter the Protein rest range).
Regarding the vossy twang, I've had very similar experience. The beers taste quite differently now: the Fermented Rye flavours have greatly subsided so the signature Kveik flavour and tanginess, previously hidden behind the Rye, stepped forward.
The only exception stays Rongoteus (because there's no Fermented Red Rye in it, just Regular Rye Malt, Rye Crystal and Roasted Rye), which ages gracefully.

I found the Fermented Rye flavour to be quite a volatile one, which ages out quickly in several (3 to 4) months. That's pretty natural, as neither Kveik nor Sahti (where the idea of the Red Rye came from) have historically been supposed to be aged. They used to be drunk very fresh, no later than a couple of weeks past the brewday.
 

Miraculix

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Actually what I employed was 30 minutes around 45C (Beta-glucan rest is performed at lower than 48C, higher than that we enter the Protein rest range).
Regarding the vossy twang, I've had very similar experience. The beers taste quite differently now: the Fermented Rye flavours have greatly subsided so the signature Kveik flavour and tanginess, previously hidden behind the Rye, stepped forward.
The only exception stays Rongoteus (because there's no Fermented Red Rye in it, just Regular Rye Malt, Rye Crystal and Roasted Rye), which ages gracefully.

I found the Fermented Rye flavour to be quite a volatile one, which ages out quickly in several (3 to 4) months. That's pretty natural, as neither Kveik nor Sahti (where the idea of the Red Rye came from) have historically been supposed to be aged. They used to be drunk very fresh, no later than a couple of weeks past the brewday.
Yes, 45C was the temperature, my mistake. Worked pretty well.
 

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...Our talk tempted me to crack open a Rongoteus now (the next bottle would be the last one from the batch of twelve).
Tastes great.
Cheers! :mug:
 

faithie999

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Here's a great, totally authentic historical recipe of Kentucky Common Ale as it was brewed in 1912:


It's in my Beers-To-Brew-List, will probably brew it in the spring.
43% of Maize and 12 IBUs promise a nice, sweet and very quaffable beer.
I think I'll give this a try. the only question I would have is the time and temp for the hop stand final hop addition.
thanks
 

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When not stated otherwise, I always assume the hopstand lasts as long as the hot wort is being chilled. You add hops at the flameout and discard when transferring to fermenter.
It's a tiny addition as you see in the recipe, it won't add any additional bitterness.
 

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Generally, if something doesn't describe itself as "instant" or "pre-gelatinized" or "torrified," it's probably not pre-cooked and it's going to need a cereal mash.
Because we use gluten free grains, our entire batch is essentially cereal mashed every time. We have to get up above 170F to gelanize and use powerful well engineered enzymes that are good up to 175F and higher.
 
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delcosansgluten

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HNY everyone, I closed out 2022 brewing the Kentucky Common. Very excited to try this one, if you've never used Cluster hops, you'll be pleasantly surprised, their aroma was something else. The oats give the wort a velvety characteristic that I'm hoping translates into a creamer mouthfeel. Unfortunately, the recirculating pump started to leak so unless im able to repair it, this may be the mash and boil's last brew. Having to manually recirculate the wort is not where its at...

Ended up with the following grain bill based on what I had on hand.

5 lbs Pale Millet
4 lbs Biscuit Rice
3 lbs Corn Grits
2 lbs Pale Oat Malt
1 lbs Biscuit Rice 4L
8 oz Caramel 120L Millet
4 oz Caramel 90L Millet
2 oz Cluster Hops (60 min & 7 min)
1 sachet Lallemand Koln Yeast
 

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delcosansgluten

delcosansgluten

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grain to glass in 12 days is a record for me, this style is supposed to be consumed green but in hindsight it would likely benefit from 2 weeks in primary and 1 week bottle condition.

the effect the oats have on the body of the beer is the first thing i noticed, that and they have a dry nuttiness to them. I think next time ill reduce the oats and will add in buckwheat.

glad to have 2 cases of these to last me until the common lager is ready.
 

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delcosansgluten

delcosansgluten

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so basically all this beer needed was a few more days to bottle condition. its a delicious beer and the subtle chocolate and caramel standout once the nuttiness of the oats died down. very much worth brewing this one.
 
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delcosansgluten

delcosansgluten

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the more of these i drink, the more i like it. whats standing out more to me is how neutral the Koln yeast is. The grains are the dominant flavors and I guessed I never picked up on this before for some reason.
 

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