Keggle Mash Tun - Sparging

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Griffsta

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
104
Reaction score
0
Location
Concord, OH (CLEVELAND)
First all grain brew this weekend, so forgive the stupid question.

I have the capability to direct fire the mash tun, but if I batch sparge, what is the typical heat loss over a 60 minute mash? I have a somewhat decent lid for it, but I know it wont keep the heat. Do I just fire it up every 5 or 10 minutes to maintain the temp?

Now, if I decide to fly sparge, would I ever have any need to heat up the mash tun (seeing that the 168` water will be coming out of the HLT, I would think it should keep it pretty hot.) Again, first time all grainer...

So, with these options, should I batch sparge in the Keggle MLT, or would you fly sparge? I hear the fly sparging has better efficiency, but the batch sparge certainly seems easier.

Whatcha all think? I appreciate any input.
 

brewmasterpa

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
804
Reaction score
5
Location
orange, ca
i always fly sparge, ive found my efficiency to be consistenly between 75 and 85 % depending on the brew. you can usually get most of your high temp from a fly sparge. theres no need to heat the tun while fly sparging. just get your water nice and hot (usually between 180 and boiling depending on how long of a sparge you make) ive never used a keggle for mashing, i use a rubbermaid 10 gallon cooler and i lose between 2-4 degrees during an 90 minute mash. if youre direct firing a keggle, you should be able to hold whatever temp you want quite easily.
 

Dougan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2008
Messages
453
Reaction score
1
Location
Stevens Point, WI
I think if it's your first all-grain to do the batch. It removes some steps and lowers the learning curve.
 

HenryHill

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2007
Messages
3,039
Reaction score
13
Location
Perry, MI
Doubting he can pump if he's just starting AG.

I use the MLT as HLT, heating it to my strike temp. I slowly dough in to prevent dough balls, and then cover the opening, and throw a couple big winter coats over it-being careful not to let the coats touch the lower skirt as it's hot as a MOFO for awhile. I don't stir once it's covered-I just wait an hour.

It works.
 

Bobby_M

Vendor and Brewer
HBT Sponsor
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
25,798
Reaction score
5,226
Location
Whitehouse Station
Whether you direct fire the MLT or not has nothing to do with the sparge method. If you brew in a garage or outside where it's 50F, you're going to lose a few degrees over a 60 minute mash. Being able to direct fire means you can provide a SMALL amount of heat about half way through the mash while recirculating some of the mash (if you have a false bottom) to bring it back.

I heat my strike in the MLT and let it go 5F too hot, then I put insulation on the keg and let it suck some heat. When I hit strike temp, I mix in the grain and cover it well. That certainly helps but I still lose about 3-4F in 30 minutes.
 
OP
Griffsta

Griffsta

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2009
Messages
104
Reaction score
0
Location
Concord, OH (CLEVELAND)
Thats correct, I cannot pump yet, but I dont see why I would need to in order to fly sparge. Am I missing something? I thought that after my mash, I simply recirculate a couple quarts, then sparge with 170` water till I get 6.5 gallons, or 1.008, whichever comes first.... Is this correct?

Now, I thought that if I use +180 degree water to sparge with, it puts those nasty tannins into my wort. Does this not happen during sparging? I thought I was supposed to sparge around 170. Can somebody please clarify this for me, because its confusing the crap our of me.

Also, if I do decide to batch sparge, Do I want to do it in one singe batch, or should I be double-batch sparging for some reason? If I do it in one batch, how much extra water would I add. (havent quite figured out how if beersmith is supposed to tell me this).
 

Denny

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jun 4, 2005
Messages
5,544
Reaction score
1,073
Location
Eugene
It's the temp of the grain bed, not the water that matters. In addition, pH is more of a concern with regards to tannin extraction than the water temp is. IMO, one batch sparge should be all you need.
 

HenryHill

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2007
Messages
3,039
Reaction score
13
Location
Perry, MI
If you are on a tiered system than gravity will sparge for you. I would batch sparge until you know your equipment better, then decide if you want to change.

You may want to consider a mash out before sparging.

Also, knowing what volume you NEED to have for preboil, is a better method than constantly gauging gravity at sparge.
 

brewmasterpa

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
804
Reaction score
5
Location
orange, ca
the purpose of the temperature being high for the sparge is to stop conversion of the grains. anything over 170 should achieve this. its my understanding that the tannins are broken and rebonded during the boil, but if youve mashed at the apporpriate temps, this shouldnt be an issue. could be wrong though. this is the method ive used for a long time now and never had an issue. i have consistent results. im no scientist as ive said several times, im sure theres somebody on here that could explain the science far better than i can.
 
Top