Quantcast

Kegging while bubbling

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

mrkeeg

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2005
Messages
224
Reaction score
1
Location
Sundre, AB
Well, my high test bitter has been at it for about a month. For a few weeks now there has just been a small steady peppering of very tiny bubbles. The airlock only blurps every 5 mins or so.

I think I'll keg this tonight, as I need the secondary. I don't think anything too bad can come of this? It's very dark, so clarity shouldn't matter as much. I can force carbonate it, but monitor the pressure if it continues to ferment a bit, and let it continue to cure in the keg.

Sound cool?

Keegan
 
OP
M

mrkeeg

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2005
Messages
224
Reaction score
1
Location
Sundre, AB
Hmm,
supposing I DIDN't force carbonate it then, but just occasionally let out the pressure... wouldn't the keg just act more or less as a second secondary? There is really not much gas being produced. if I got a bit of sediment, it would only be the first glass full...

Thanks,
Keegan
 

homebrewer_99

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2005
Messages
19,578
Reaction score
1,193
Location
I-80, Exit 27 (near the Quad Cities)
Gravity has nothing to do with the carbonation, especially forced. It has to do with the yeasts efficiency at converting the sugar to alcohol.

You could check your gravity to see if it is within the range of the style. If it is then you can/should be able to safely bottle/keg safely.

By all means carbonate as you normally would.
 
OP
M

mrkeeg

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2005
Messages
224
Reaction score
1
Location
Sundre, AB
Ok, thanks again!

I guess I still don't see what the harm is in kegging early... especially if I occasionally release the pressure ... if I'm not drinking it, shouldn't it continue to ferment just as it would have in the secondary, until all the sugars have been digested and the correct gravity is reached?

Thanks
newbie
Keegan
 

Janx

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Messages
1,677
Reaction score
24
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
You can keg it. It can't possibly have much sugar left to ferment, and a keg can hold 130 PSI so you don't have the dangers of exploding bottles.

Lots of folks ferment primary and secondary in kegs...you can either wait a bit and force carbonate it, or, if you like the way it tastes now, chill it, carbonate it and drink it. Cheers! :D
 
OP
M

mrkeeg

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2005
Messages
224
Reaction score
1
Location
Sundre, AB
Kegged it and partied with it! No problems (a bit foamy..)
Thanks
 

rixport

Member
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
22
Reaction score
0
Location
Intervale NH
mrkeeg said:
Hmm,
supposing I DIDN't force carbonate it then, but just occasionally let out the pressure... wouldn't the keg just act more or less as a second secondary? There is really not much gas being produced. if I got a bit of sediment, it would only be the first glass full...

Thanks,
Keegan
Take a hydrometer reading and if it's shows that it's at the terminal gravity you're shooting for, taste it and keg it. If you taste it and it tastes bad, the continuing 'fermentation' can actually be gasses produced by an infection. It aint gonna get better if this is the case (in my opinion). If it tastes good at this point, it will probably be great when it's carbonated and being drank. Good luck.

Ken
 

bikebryan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2005
Messages
556
Reaction score
4
Location
Alexandria, VA
homebrewer_99 said:
Yes, it would continue fermenting until you refridgerate it.

The cold retards the fermenting process. At that time any additional fermentation is absorbed by the brew producing carbonation.
The cold does retard the fermenting process, 'tis true; however, since the fermentation stops at that point, there is no "additional fermentation) that can cause carbonation.
 
Top