Kegging guide for double regulator

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Paul Lowe

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Hi there

Does anyone have a good link to a guide on how to set up kegs with a double regulator. I have no idea what i am doing.
 

VikeMan

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VikeMan

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Does anyone have a good link to a guide on how to set up kegs with a double regulator. I have no idea what i am doing.
Or, if you just mean a single regulator with two gauges (high and low pressure)... The high pressure gauge tells you how much pressure is coming from the CO2 tank. And the low pressure gauge tells you how much the keg is pressurized. All covered in the linked .pdf.
 
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Paul Lowe

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Or, if you just mean a single regulator with two gauges (high and low pressure)... The high pressure gauge tells you how much pressure is coming from the CO2 tank. And the low pressure gauge tells you how much the keg is pressurized. All covered in the linked .pdf.
Thanks. I meant a dual regulator.
 

SLCRex

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I recently picked up one of these and it's pretty straightforward. The gauge with the higher numbers up to ~1000psig is the pressure in your Co2 tank. The other two gauges (with much lower numbers) are for regulating the pressure going into your kegs. If you are running 2 kegs then you can run two different pressures if you need to. Each regulator should have a single output. Connect that output to your keg. Your connections will depend on the type of keg and connections on the keg, ball lock, pinlock etc...
Turn the valve to adjust the pressure and the keg will stay at that pressure. If you want to lower the pressure in the keg you will have to relieve the pressure and then adjust the valve to the lower pressure. When I first keg my beer I turn it up to 30psig, let the Co2 flow until I hear it stop and then fully relieve the pressure. I do this 3 times (old timer friend told me this works to get rid of the oxygen in the keg) and then I keep the keg at 30psig for 24 hours. After the 24 hours is up I relieve the pressure in the keg down to the recommended pressure for the style and temperature of my kegerator (Keg Carbonation Chart). Let it sit for at least 5 days and start enjoying it.

I am new to kegging and originally thought I could just start drinking after the first 24 hours. What I discovered is that it had a hint of carbonation. So I got online and looked at a bunch of suggestions. The one I tried was turning the keg on it's side with Co2 set 25psig and rolled it back and forth on the floor for 10 mins or so, until I couldn't hear the Co2 flowing into the tank. The idea is that you increase the surface area of the beer inside the keg. What I ended up with was foam for several days. I thought I had overcarbed the beer but it turned out fine after 3 days. I was also dealing with a kegerator that would fluctuate temps and the beer was too warm at 45 to 50 degs, plus the length of my pouring line was too short at 3'. I went to 6' pouring lines and an Inkbird temp regulator and my beer is perfectly carbonated now. Probably TMI but thought I would let you know the headache I had with kegging and not knowing what I was doing. Good luck!
 
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