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Keg Carbonation Question

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Silentclint

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So I have been researching a lot about keg carbonation. I have successfully kegged 5 kegs worth of beer using the same carbonation technique which is 30 psi for 24 hours than 20 psi for 24 hours at about 34 degrees, than put to serving pressure around 6-8 psi after that. The only problem is that with my wheat beer and my pilsner it just comes out all foam. I have tried to release pressure a few times a day for 4 days or so and then try it again but still all foam.... I am frustrated since my other 5 batches turned out great. Any thoughts?

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Lost

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If you must force carb then set regulator at serving pressure and shake. Then let settle overnight.

The elevated pressure method is a gamble as you have discovered.
 
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Silentclint

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How can I salvage my foamy beer? The Bavarian Wheat I made is awesome but foamy. Is there a way to get not to be foamy? Also for the future is it best to just let it sit for 1 week at serving pressure to carbonate or does it need longer?
 

Lost

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Silentclint said:
How can I salvage my foamy beer? The Bavarian Wheat I made is awesome but foamy. Is there a way to get not to be foamy? Also for the future is it best to just let it sit for 1 week at serving pressure to carbonate or does it need longer?
If it is over carbed then purge/vent the keg a couple times until problem subsides.

The most consistent way to carb is to let it sit at serving pressure for 1-2 weeks. It would probably be drinkable about 7-10 days in.

That said, wheats are usually well carbonated, are you sure you have enough line length to accommodate the pressure you are serving the wheat beer at?

How much pressure, what hose diameter, what hose length?

LHBS seem to often sell beer lines that are too short.

Edit: 6-8 psi is not much, line length probably isn't the problem unless you line is less than 5ft and is 1/4" diameter. Still, it would be nice to know more about your particular setup.
 
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Silentclint

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I use a 5 foot 3/16 ID line on my set up. I think that maybe the beer isn't getting carbonated enough and the serving pressure is just making it foamy??? How about I put it at 8 psi for another week or 2 then try it again??? Do I need a greater serving PSI?
 

Lost

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No, the serving pressure isn't making it foamy. The line could be longer allowing for a more gentle pour. But at 8 psi I don't think that is the issue. The beer is very likely over carbed. Purge the keg and let it sit over night before putting it back under pressure and see if the situation improves.

Edit: more serving pressure would be the exact thing to not do.
 

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I use a 5 foot 3/16 ID line on my set up. I think that maybe the beer isn't getting carbonated enough and the serving pressure is just making it foamy??? How about I put it at 8 psi for another week or 2 then try it again??? Do I need a greater serving PSI?
Yes, I think turning it down is causing co2 to come out of suspension causing a major foamy pour. That's what happens when you don't have enough resistance and the co2 escapes from solution. You get a foamy pour with lots of head, but seemingly flat beer. That's because an overcarbed beer is being poured through a too-short line with the pressure dropped to "serving pressure" and causing the co2 to come out of solution.

First, you need longer lines. 5' isn't long enough. Secondly, you need one set pressure not the super-high carbonation pressure followed by a too-low "serving pressure". Once your system is balanced properly, you won't have this issue.
 
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Silentclint

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I think I finally solved my problem. All the times my beer was foamy when the keg was close to being empty there were ice chunks in it. I turned the temp up to around 40 degrees F and put two kegs on tap, so far really good pours on both..... Here's to hoping that the problem is finally fixed!

Cheers and have a Happy New Year!
 
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