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Keezer with Perlick 650SS and varying pressures... flow control doesn't help

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darkrabbit

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Hi all, I just built a keezer and installed Perlick 650SS's, bought them because the flow control was supposed to allow me to control the pour to minimize foam, many on the forum said they're able to get a great pour regardless of PSI with flow control. Some say they have 5 foot lines and are able to pour 20PSI beers properly.

I however am not.

I have a Hefe at 18.5PSI and a stout at 8PSI (I have a 4 way regulator), both @40F, 5ft lines, 6" shanks. The stout is manageable, but with the Hefe I find that I can't really get a decent pour without spraying a LOT of foam. I just turn it up a little and I can get low foam but it's basically a drip. Any more and it is half foam.

If I need to lengthen my lines I am fine with that, but I just wanted to check how those of you with 650SS are able to control your foam for highly carbed / pressured beers. Am I starting with too small a line?

The idea here is I want one line length for all beers so I am not mucking around with lines every time I drop a new keg in, and I can have the right carbonation for all types of beers.

Thanks in advance!
 

Nagorg

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I think your lines are too short. I'd suggest you start longer (~10-12 ft) and cut shorter until you find the right balance. I stuck 12 foot lines on my setup and stopped there. I get great pours.
 

LLBeanJ

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The 650s are nice, but not a panacea when it comes to reducing foam. At that high of a carb level, the only real solution is to go with a significantly longer line. Also, make sure you have a fan in the keezer to keep the air circulating, otherwise you will have foaming issues that even longer lines will not be able to overcome.
 

Jayjay1976

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Sorry if this is off topic, but what is it about longer lines that tames the pour?
 
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Sorry if this is off topic, but what is it about longer lines that tames the pour?
Long lines reduce the pressure before it gets to the tap. This becomes very evident if you ever serve root beer at 40psi.

I have four 650ss taps. I also have 12' lines. I've been meaning to test out much shorter lines - I want to change to all shorts and john guest fittings some day. Wish I had done the testing already and could offer some advice here. I will say I greatly prefer the 600 series taps over my previous 525ss taps.
 

day_trippr

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What long lines do is help prevent CO2 breakout in the face of a rather large pressure differential between keg and glass, by gradually allowing the pressure on the beer to fall to virtually atmospheric over the length of the line, shank and open faucet.

I don't think an FC faucet can really mimic the physics very well...

Cheers!
 
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darkrabbit

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Excellent, thanks all! I put in a 10ft line for the Hefe and it helped but still too much foam. I needed a 10 anyway, so that's why I cut it. I'll pop in a 15ft line next and try that. I guess there is no real replacement for the line length, which makes sense now.

I love the taps, honestly if they just help me pour growlers better they'll be worth the extra $5-$10 for the FC. And I can easily keep a bunch of lines made and swap them in when I swap different beers.
 
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