Keezer collars - which wood to use?

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vance

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Can't seem to find a good idea of what to use for my collar. What's the best choice for type of wood and its thickness?
 

kh54s10

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When and if I ever do a collar I plan to make a sandwich. Relatively cheap plywood on the inside, a layer of insulation foam and a good looking hardwood on the outside. For the hardwood I would be looking for a nice grain pattern rather than the type of wood. The total thickness I would look for is about the same as the walls of the freezer.
 

55x11

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I went cedar on the inside. NIce hardwood on the outside. My hardwood cost 4 times the cedar. Cedar is cheap
 
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Is it standard practice to do two layers of wood? I'm planning to keep it simple, so I had just one piece of wood in mine.
 

RedlegEd

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When and if I ever do a collar I plan to make a sandwich. Relatively cheap plywood on the inside, a layer of insulation foam and a good looking hardwood on the outside. For the hardwood I would be looking for a nice grain pattern rather than the type of wood. The total thickness I would look for is about the same as the walls of the freezer.
+1 ^^^ this. Not only is it cheaper than using all hardwood, it has a high thermal efficiency, and the outside looks really nice. You can always go the easy, functional route and use
(i.e. 2x6 or 2x8, but the outside finish won't be nearly as nice.) Whatever you decide to do, good luck (and post pics!)
:mug:
 
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55x11

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Is it standard practice to do two layers of wood? I'm planning to keep it simple, so I had just one piece of wood in mine.
in my case, the inside cedar rectangle sits on top of the freezer, and has the same footprint as the freezer walls. The outside wood (hardwood) is wider, on 3 sides and goes lower, on the outside, with large screws thru both pieces of wood that when tighten, squeeze the freezer body from the outside and secure the collar to the freezer. So it looks nice(r) but also serves a function.
Not sure if I explained it well. Perhaps I need to take some photos.
 
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vance

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in my case, the inside cedar rectangle sits on top of the freezer, and has the same footprint as the freezer walls. The outside wood (hardwood) is wider, on 3 sides and goes lower, on the outside, with large screws thru both pieces of wood that when tighten, squeeze the freezer body from the outside and secure the collar to the freezer. So it looks nice(r) but also serves a function.
Not sure if I explained it well. Perhaps I need to take some photos.
If you don't mind that'd be great, I've heard of something like that but can't visualize it.
 

55x11

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If you don't mind that'd be great, I've heard of something like that but can't visualize it.
So the first two photos show the cedar (inside) boards. They are sitting on top of the freezer and are flush with the outside walls of the freezer.
The second layer boards (hardwood) are wider, they are flush with the cedar planks on the top but reach lower and are pressing on the outside walls of the freezer. By tightening the bolts this pressure is what is holding the collar secure against the freezer. I only used three of them on the perimeter, since the back cedar board is where the door mounts on, and three is enough.

IMG_9544.JPG


IMG_9551.JPG


IMG_9558.JPG


IMG_9559.JPG
 
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vance

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Huh, interesting. I think I'm going to do plain old cedar for now (probably stained and sealed), with maybe adding hardwood at a later date.

What size pieces did you use for the inner collar?
 

day_trippr

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I would not use plywood in fabricating a collar as it complicates all the joinery, leaves raw edges to attach to cabinet and gaskets, and is much more susceptible to mold than solid wood.

Two-by for the core structure provides rigidity and solid attachment for hinges and clean surfaces for gaskets and attaching to the cabinet, 1-by for outside "skin", and lined with rigid foam...

Cheers!
 

CGVT

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I used oak boards on the outside, styrofoam, and then 1/2 plywood on the inside. My build is in my sig...
 

mongoose33

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Mine is done pretty much the same way as 55x11's above. I stained and sealed w/ polyurethane before final assembly to protect the wood against moisture.

One other thing that's different: my keezer collar is not affixed to the mouth of the freezer. I used pickup truck bed insulation/mounting tape on the top of the freezer mouth, using thin plastic strips and double-sided tape to fill in between the corners, which stood proud of the rest of the mouth.

The wooden facade on my keezer extends below the mouth of the freezer on three sides. The collar/lid is heavy enough to seal against air leaks, and is held in place on three sides by the wooden facade. This means I can remove the collar and lid if I want to make moving easier or to otherwise work on the freezer.

Here's a pic showing what I mean:

collarfacade.jpg
 

sketchykg

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I used the cheapest 2x6 I could find and stained/sealed it. 1x8 stain grain wood on the exterior. The collar is covered as well by reflectix on the interior. I assume it'll outlast the freezer.
 

crazyjake19

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I used 2x6 boards and 2" polyiso insulation. Didn't do a full inside layer of wood, just a small section to mount the manifold to. The keezer is in the basement with lines going up to the first floor, so the keezer doesn't need to look great, just painted the collar white.

If the keezer was going to be visible, I probably would've went with the hardwood-insulation-cedar sandwich like someone already mentioned.
 
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Can you describe more your plan for the collar? I'm having a hard time with the specifics (not very experienced with woodworking).
 

sketchykg

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I based mine on this series of posts. I invested most in the faucet and regulator hardware since I figure the freezer will die before they would need replacing. Wood and freezer then easily replaced. I.e I think I paid more for the 4x secondary regulator than the freezer.

But basically, framing grade 2x6 in a box to match the freezer dimensions. 1x8 stain grade for the front and sides, so that it overlaps the freezer. Then attach freezer lid to collar and silicon it to the bottom of the freezer.

http://homebrewacademy.com/how-to-build-a-keezer/
 

Justintoxicated

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I just used 2x8's and a ton of stain and varnish :) Not as fancy as many but I'm happy with it since it sits in the garage.

Might go fancier next time around though. I don't have many wood working tools or I would have made it into a cooler project, I had my step dad cut the boards and I helped him put it together. Then I got it home and did all the finishing / fit work on it. I wanted something nicer, but I don't think he was that into it and I don't have room for a table saw at my place, I think he just picked up whatever the cheapest wood he could find was and looked for a good piece. I don't recommend doing that because it wasn't as straight as I could have liked and took a day of sanding to get it decent.

Keezer by glamisduner, on Flickr

Keezer collar by glamisduner, on Flickr

The inside:
https://goo.gl/photos/TQNRVnwmcxCEKNRh9

Maybe I should add some insulation... Where do you get that stuff that stick on the wood?

I put weather stripping under the collar to make a good seal, but didn't make it permanently attached so I can remove it when cleaning. (otherwise it's hard to reach the bottom!)

In the process of adding the 5th tap, so I guess I'm going to have to sell this drip tray.
 

Justintoxicated

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Should have went with a darker stain, but it was an extremely secure fit to the freezer without silicone, etc. and has worked out great.
your freezer looks very similar to mine. I was going to order that same low pressure setup you have there but I felt it might make it hard to put kegs in and out. So while I'm just going to have two pressures to play with for now, and a new manifold.

Do you find the regulators get in the way? Cause that is exactly where I was going to put mine too!
 

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I ended up making my on 2 x 6 being that all the 2 x 6's that I looked at were either warped, torqued, or bent every which way down by me. I just purchased some 1 x 6 select grade and glued them together. Then put a wooden front on three sides that was 3/8" than my 2 x 6 to hide the gasket if I decide to paint it black.

Corner-1.jpg
 
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Damn, I wish I knew anything about woodworking, or knew someone who did... the two layer with a cheap 2" piece and a nicer outer layer seems ideal, but I just don't think I have the ability to make it look good. I think I'm just going to find the straightest 2x6 pieces I can and hope for the best.
 

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your freezer looks very similar to mine. I was going to order that same low pressure setup you have there but I felt it might make it hard to put kegs in and out. So while I'm just going to have two pressures to play with for now, and a new manifold.



Do you find the regulators get in the way? Cause that is exactly where I was going to put mine too!

A little bit. Actually the liquid hoses + hose barbs get more in the way. But it's a tight fit in a 6.9 cubic feet freezer. 3 regular ball lock kegs, a 20 # co2 tank and a pin lock keg converted to ball lock on the hump.
 

sketchykg

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Damn, I wish I knew anything about woodworking, or knew someone who did... the two layer with a cheap 2" piece and a nicer outer layer seems ideal, but I just don't think I have the ability to make it look good. I think I'm just going to find the straightest 2x6 pieces I can and hope for the best.

I found the thread with more info on my build. Take you time. If I can do it, you'll be fine.

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=548903
 
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vance

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Still beyond my abilities, honestly.
 

wilserbrewer

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Is it standard practice to do two layers of wood? I'm planning to keep it simple, so I had just one piece of wood in mine.
It all depends on personal preference and how far you want to go.

A simple collar with one thickness of recycled wood worked fine for me, no insulation btw...

I have since changed over to using a large fridge due to my keezer sweating on the inside walls down in my basement....
 

wilserbrewer

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Is it standard practice to do two layers of wood? I'm planning to keep it simple, so I had just one piece of wood in mine.
It all depends on personal preference and how far you want to go. Some build for function only, some want impressive appearance.

A simple collar with one thickness of recycled wood worked fine for me, no insulation btw...

I have since changed over to using a large fridge due to my keezer sweating on the inside walls down in my basement....
 

Justintoxicated

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A little bit. Actually the liquid hoses + hose barbs get more in the way. But it's a tight fit in a 6.9 cubic feet freezer. 3 regular ball lock kegs, a 20 # co2 tank and a pin lock keg converted to ball lock on the hump.
Ahh yea, mine is a 7.1 cuft my shanks are in the way too, I'm going to try some shorter ones but I think the hoses will always be in the way. That's why I thought putting regulators there might make the other side not accessible as well. Then I would only have or 1-2 locations I could pull kegs from, right now it's only hard to pull the keg under the shanks. I guess I can always buy that fancy manifold later, its been on my list for years and I was going to wait until I moved the CO2 tank outside to fit the 5th keg in. And here I am in the processes of doing that and decided against buying it again lol. Sure would be nice though :)

What is that insulation stuff? I should probably get some and build one of those fan attached to PVC to help with circulation and condensation.
 

sketchykg

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Still beyond my abilities, honestly.

This is like the easiest option:

[ame]https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zHWy_Vlw3J4[/ame]

You can always just go with picnic taps and forgo building the collar at all. A good place to start anyhow.
 

sketchykg

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What is that insulation stuff? I should probably get some and build one of those fan attached to PVC to help with circulation and condensation.

Reflectix. They have at Home Depot. Light, cheap and easy to work with. I just taped it it with the foil tape. It's good too to insulate electric boil kettles, mash tuns, etc.

Yeah, I saw those pvc builds for air movement. I think that is my biggest issue right now. That small fan I have to move air around is not cutting it.
 

jwelch1103

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I used 2x fir for the inner pieces and 1x poplar on the outer. Sealed and primed with Kilz then painted the poplar dark brown. My keezer is in my basement so I wasn't looking for a finished furniture look.
 

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Just to add another option, I used white Poly/PVC board. Moisture won't be a problem, and I find it looks really good on a white freezer. I used 1x4 boards on the outside, insulated the inside, and sealed it to the freezer with and outdoor construction adhesive.
 

PerryS

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Can't seem to find a good idea of what to use for my collar. What's the best choice for type of wood and its thickness?
I used 2x6 construction-grade redwood. It may seem counter-intuitive, but finished construction-grade redwood has all sorts of interesting artifacts around the knots and voids.

Fill, sand, repeat. Seal, sand, repeat. I used water-based Varathane, about four coats.
 

kh54s10

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I would not use plywood in fabricating a collar as it complicates all the joinery, leaves raw edges to attach to cabinet and gaskets, and is much more susceptible to mold than solid wood.

Two-by for the core structure provides rigidity and solid attachment for hinges and clean surfaces for gaskets and attaching to the cabinet, 1-by for outside "skin", and lined with rigid foam...

Cheers!
I would sand the raw edges of the plywood smooth and seal it up really well before assembly. It would then only be as susceptible to mold as any other material with the same seal coat.

I am positive I could do the joinery acceptably, I don't really care how nice the inside is....

The idea of the plywood on the inside is it will take a lot more abuse than just having foam on the inside.
 

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I used a thin 1/8"? PVC board for the inside to give the collers and the manifold something to hold onto. Two layers ridgid insulation and a simple painted pine board for the outside. Fish tanked each layer of insulation. The insulation is the same width as the top lip of the freezer so the inside and outside wood can kind of clamp onto the freezer like a c-clamp.

image.jpg
 
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