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Johnson Controllers and GFCI Plugs

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PurpleJeepXJ

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So I have a kegorator that I built several years ago. It is built from a Marvel Mini-freezer. Looks like a mini-fridge but is a freezer. I use a temperature controller, Johnson or similar, to control the temperature in the mini-freezer. This set up worked great for a couple years. The freezer has an in-line GFCI plug that plugs in to the temp controller and then in to the wall. Recently the GFCI plug has been tripping randomly. Could the constant cutting of power on/off through the use of the controller have caused the GFCI plug to start going bad? What do y'all suggest?
 

Jim311

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You more than likely have a bad ground or a short circuit somewhere within the refrigerator itself. Frequent cycling should have nothing to do with tripping the GFI.
 

augiedoggy

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You more than likely have a bad ground or a short circuit somewhere within the refrigerator itself. Frequent cycling should have nothing to do with tripping the GFI.
In short, It normal for this to happen.

I think it has to do with the compressor or starter... This is actually one reason you wont find a GFCI plug speced for use where a kitchen fridge plugs in... I have read many times that older and even new fridges and freezers can cause GFCI breakers and outlets to pop. The fridge/freezer will likely continue to work fine for years if plugged int a regular outlet and would still have the breaker protecting the circuit.

to quote the link below "Why does the fridge trip the GFCI?

Any inductive load when switched off, can produce electromagnetic interference (EMI). This interference can, and often does, trip GFCI devices. Most vapor compression refrigerators have a few inductive loads, any of which could cause the trip."

http://diy.stackexchange.com/questions/53252/why-is-gfci-tripping-on-refrigerator-circuit

https://search.yahoo.com/yhs/search...ws+7+Home+Premium&type=wbf_popjar_16_20_ssg09
 
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