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I've started my second batch

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grbr

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I have left only 6 bottles from my first batch, I am "home alone" until Sunday, so I jumped in into making my second batch.

It is almost 3am here, it rains, I am at my basement entrance, so outside, but I managed to secure the kettle from the rain.

I hope I'll improve significantly this time. I've throw away all the barley flour after grinding. I am not rushing with the fire, hopefully I'll manage to keep the temperature below 70C during the mash hour.

I also modified the receipt, I made it a bit stronger (5L water per 1kg barley, vs 6 last time).

It will be a long night and day, but I enjoy it!

I'll post updates as I go.

IMG_20200808_023124.jpg
 

AJinJacksonville

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Sweet man! Have fun! What part of the world are you in? And...is that a mash paddle that has the blue grip and head? Or home defense? Haha.
 
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grbr

grbr

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Sweet man! Have fun! What part of the world are you in? And...is that a mash paddle that has the blue grip and head? Or home defense? Haha.
Thanks, it is fun!

South-west Balkans.

Ah, that... didn't I mentioned I am alone in the dark? Protection gadget! :D
 

AJinJacksonville

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I'm sure it could double as a paddle if you needed it...haha.

What style are you brewing on this one?
 
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grbr

grbr

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I'm sure it could double as a paddle if you needed it...haha.

What style are you brewing on this one?
I guess it is Ale. 8.5kg Pale Ale, 0.4kg Chateau Peated and only 0.1kg of the special Belgian, it made the beer quite dark last time.

So, total of 9kg barley and 45L water.

I am not following a recipe or something, I just try things. Hopefully it will work out even better this time.
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RM-MN

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Throwing out the flour limits you mash efficiency. The flour goes through conversion really quickly and completely. Since it converts so quickly you don't have to worry about maintaining the mash temperature for so long. Adding heat during the mash is a possible problem since the mash is thick enough to limit the heat exchange and you can easily get the grain near the bottom hot enough to denature the very enzymes you depend on for conversion. A much better approach is to leave all the flour in the mash, put the lid on and insulate the kettle, then ignore it for the mash period and enjoy a beer.
 
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grbr

grbr

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Throwing out the flour limits you mash efficiency. The flour goes through conversion really quickly and completely. Since it converts so quickly you don't have to worry about maintaining the mash temperature for so long. Adding heat during the mash is a possible problem since the mash is thick enough to limit the heat exchange and you can easily get the grain near the bottom hot enough to denature the very enzymes you depend on for conversion. A much better approach is to leave all the flour in the mash, put the lid on and insulate the kettle, then ignore it for the mash period and enjoy a beer.
Yes, someone else here mentioned the flour isn't the cause for the haze beer, but I had to try it. It could also be this electrical gadget/grinder produces a lot of flour. For my next batch I'll order the grains precrashed, probably there won't be that much of it.
 

RM-MN

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There are at least a couple causes for haze in your beer. Unconverted starch is a permanent haze. There is also chill haze which is caused by proteins but that can be cured by chilling the beer and letting it set so the proteins settle out.
 

Brulian

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I have left only 6 bottles from my first batch, I am "home alone" until Sunday, so I jumped in into making my second batch.

It is almost 3am here, it rains, I am at my basement entrance, so outside, but I managed to secure the kettle from the rain.

I hope I'll improve significantly this time. I've throw away all the barley flour after grinding. I am not rushing with the fire, hopefully I'll manage to keep the temperature below 70C during the mash hour.

I also modified the receipt, I made it a bit stronger (5L water per 1kg barley, vs 6 last time).

It will be a long night and day, but I enjoy it!

I'll post updates as I go.

View attachment 692999
Goodluck man!
Never a bad time to start a new brew :ban:
 
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grbr

grbr

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Five days after bottling, I am way more satisfied with the second batch, both taste and look. This beer looks clearer compared to my first batch. But, I am determined I'll order my grains for the third batch milled.

Oh, and now I think I am beginning to understand the talk about sparging and efficiency. For my first two batches I went with the no-sparge method... well, I was ignoring that chapter, it was all Chinese to my ears. But, now I understood I am loosing beer!
25L bottled beer from 9kg grains and 45L water. I guess my efficiency is very poor.

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