I've never seen active fermentation in that short a time span

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Sematary

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2017
Messages
173
Reaction score
48
Not sure what the difference is - besides the fact that the yeast was refrigerated while waiting for me to have a brew day but I was done at 3 p.m. yesterday and at 9 a.m. this morning, that airlock is a crackalackin. That's pretty awesome. :)
Same yeast as my last batch. Of course, this time I pitched the yeast in water before adding it to the wort. So maybe it was the combination of both. I've pitched yeast in water prior to adding to wort before and I've never seen it get this active this early
 

sibelman

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Nov 22, 2007
Messages
34
Reaction score
13
Location
Portland, OR
I'm always happy when there's a short lag time. Some brewdays, things get started before I go to bed! :D Others, not until the following afternoon.

But I've never been able to convince myself what speeds things up. Aeration, temperature, good pitch rate (cell count), pitching from a starter just at its high krausen moment... I still see considerable variation in lag time that doesn't seem to correspond with these things. I just assume some batches of yeast are more eager to get going.
 
OP
S

Sematary

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2017
Messages
173
Reaction score
48
I'm always happy when there's a short lag time. Some brewdays, things get started before I go to bed! :D Others, not until the following afternoon.

But I've never been able to convince myself what speeds things up. Aeration, temperature, good pitch rate (cell count), pitching from a starter just at its high krausen moment... I still see considerable variation in lag time that doesn't seem to correspond with these things. I just assume some batches of yeast are more eager to get going.
That may be true. lol
 

myndflyte

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2014
Messages
1,239
Reaction score
524
Location
Lake Mills
What did you pitch? A lot depends on the strain too. Yesterday I pitched Voss Kveik and within 4 hours the airlock was bubbling every few seconds. The Kveik strains are just beasts.
 

Rob2010SS

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jun 16, 2017
Messages
2,269
Reaction score
709
Location
Spring Grove
I had a similar experience with the brew I just did over the weekend. I brewed a NEIPA with OYL 011. The MFG date on the package of yeast was June 2nd and I picked it up June 27th. Super fresh! Made a 4.25L starter, placed it in the fridge 3 days before brew day and decanted the beer off morning of the brew. I aerated for 90 seconds, typical for me. I used yeast nutrient in the brew, which is UNusual for me. I typically don't use yeast nutrient. I pitched at 2:30 pm and by 11:00 pm my tilt hydrometer was showing a drop in gravity that continued going through the morning. Kicked off early. I usually have a good 24 hours before I see bubbles coming from the blowoff and I was getting bubbles at 11pm.
 

Hwk-I-St8

Supporting Member
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 10, 2014
Messages
1,776
Reaction score
750
Location
The Hawkeye State
What did you pitch? A lot depends on the strain too. Yesterday I pitched Voss Kveik and within 4 hours the airlock was bubbling every few seconds. The Kveik strains are just beasts.
Me too. I pitched hornindal at 3pm and at 10 pm it was cookin' pretty good. The next morning my garage smelled like a fruit farm.
 

BrewMan13

Whole Nother Level Brewing
Joined
Jul 26, 2011
Messages
614
Reaction score
716
Location
Delmar
I usually pitch around 2pm on any given brewday. At this point, if it's not active when I go to bed I'm disappointed, lol. Had a recent batch cranking in ~1.5 hours. Not out gassing, but actively fermenting, which I couldn't believe.
 
Top