Is this complicated mash and temp control required?

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Boar Beer

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Good Life Pale Ale
From the Complete Joy of Home Brewing by Charlie Papazian

The Ingredients are for 6 gallons

9 lbs Pale Ale-type Malt
1.6 lbs Munich malt(color 7 degrees Lovibond)
.5 lb Crystal malt (color 20 degrees Lovibond)
1.7 oz UK Fuggles hops 8 HBU 60 min boiling
1 oz UK Kent Goldings hops 6 HBU 30 min boiling
2 oz UK Kent Goldings hops 6 HBU 3 min boiling
.5 oz American Crystal hop pellets -- Dry hopping
.25 oz Powdered Irish moss
English ale-type yeast

O.G. 1.052-1.056
F.G 1.012-1.014
Bitterness: 40-45 IBU Color: 8 SRM

My question
1 In Papazian's book he starts the mash at 130-135 F holding it for 30 min Then adds boiling water to get the mash up to 155 F holding for 30 min
Add heat and bring up to 158 for 15 min
Check for complete conversion using Iodine
Bring the temp up to 167
Then move to mash to the lauter-tur and sparge with 170 F water

The rest of the process is a standard boil/hops addition

Is this complicated mash and temp control required?
What benefits will i get?
 

CBBaron

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Most people just do a single infusion mash at between 148F and 158F. For most modern malts this is sufficient.
Until you have a good control and experience with brewing all grain stick to the basics. Many people myself included nearly always use a single infusion because it produces good results.
Craig
 

the_bird

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That was my first AG recipe, and single infusion is fine. Malts are a lot more modified these days that they used to be (at least those available to homebrewers). I'm thinking Charlie wrote that recipe a LONG time ago.
 

reshp1

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I don't see a need for a protein rest with that grain bill. Do a single infusion to 155F for 60 min. The 158F part just puts the alpha enzymes into overdrive to finish conversion, more time at 155 will have pretty much the same effect. Bringing up to 167 (mashout) will better prepare the grains for lautering by lowering the viscosity of the sugars, but it's probably not necessary either, especially if you batch sparge.
 

malkore

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its not to say that other recipes wouldn't benefit from a 'step mash schedule'...but as others said, it really depends on the grainbill and the style.

especially if you are new to brewing or AG brewing, go with a single infusion the first couple batches...you have enough things to control without worrying about hitting multiple temperature rests.
 

k1v1116

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This was my first recipe as well and its an excellent pale ale. as others have said you probably dont need the protein rest in fact if you have iodine to test for starch you can probably just use the 155f rest and nothing else and just wait until the starches are fully converted. a mashout at 167 might help efficiency in the lauter but ive skipped mashout and still had 70% which isnt terrible. when i made this beer i followed all the steps as best i could and it came out great, but with what i know now its not really necessary.
 

blacklab

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I've always wondered why that step mash is included in the recipes in the book, after he talks about single infusions a few pages previous.

I've followed that recipe myself and mashed it at 152 for 60 minutes. Turned out great.

As bird said, it's probably really old. Kind of lame they haven't updated the text of the book, though.
 

reshp1

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blacklab said:
I've always wondered why that step mash is included in the recipes in the book, after he talks about single infusions a few pages previous.

I've followed that recipe myself and mashed it at 152 for 60 minutes. Turned out great.

As bird said, it's probably really old. Kind of lame they haven't updated the text of the book, though.
There's nothing wrong with the way they have it. It's just more complicated than it needs to be. There is still a reason to do each step except arguably the protein rest, but the benefit is minor. That said, if you have the ability to do a mashout etc, it's not going hurt the beer and may improve lautering and efficiency.
 
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