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How do you tell the difference. I read that the edges are different on yeast then an infection and everything I ready explained it to be yeast. However I assume something would go wrong and everything has gone perfect so far so I could just be looking to have something wrong and ocer thinking.
 
I agree it looks like yeast rafts that were broken loose by CO2 off gassing.

Hydrometer is floating low. What was the SG?
 
Original. Currently at 1.009 maybe a little less as the yeast is all over the hydrometer. Sorry flars had asked the SG and thought that was the same as OG?
 
Looks fine, but I would smell it, and if it doesn't smell very wrong then I would taste it. If your still concerned watch the gravity and make sure it is stable for a few weeks to prevent bottle bombs.
 
it looks perfectly fine - what type of yeast is it - it is probably just suspended. - take that hydrometer and poke them down - they will begin to fall out if suspensions. - Or rack and be gone with them - either way looks like a nice amber in the photo - based in the side walls, looks like the yeast was just slow, your krausen ring does not look very high - probably no starter l, so not enough pitched yeast - so they are just slow to drop out of suspension - this all assuming - based on not knowing the yeast or type of beer
 
It was the British 1089. Smack pack. The krausen was about 6" high but never really stuck to the side walls. Racked to secondary today and sampled and it taste awesome. Will bottle next week. It's supposed to be a brains traditional ale so lighter then it turned out but it taste great so I can't complain.
 
Looks fine. For future reference, don't put your hydrometer in your fermenter. Easy way to contaminate a batch/break a hydrometer. Use a wine thief or graduated cylinder to measure outside the fermenter.
 
+1 never put the hydrometer in the fermenter and don't pour from a taken sample back in. Drink it warm and flat and so you don't waste it.
 
I assume you mean - 1098 - if so that is a very dry finishing yeast - if it when up 6" inches high, it must of been primarily white to yellow color foam - depending on water chemistry- this is a high co2 kurasen - typical with this type of yeast - wont stick to sides very much and will leave floaters - as they have gasses built up in them.

I also leave hydrometers in my fermenting buckets all the time, clean and sanitize them - pretty simple and will not infect anything - they have a glass surface, just like a glass carboy - as far as them breaking - unless you put your fermentation through an earthquake I find that hard to do. - and if you are able to break your hydrometer in a fermentation vessel, you may have other issues, like agitation and oxidation to worry about.
 
I have always left it in for meads and my extract beer. I have never had an issue. Had an issue with a wine thief though. I use a bucket so I really don't know how I would break a hydrometer in it. Also smooth. The wine thief has more nooks and crannies in it. I could see not putting it into a glass carboy which I don't. I just put it in my primary bucket. I sanitize the hydrometer put it in when I pitch the yeast and leave it there to I rack.

The beer in trying to clone was very dry. Like I said I tried it and it taste awesome. It seems to have finished at about 1.005.

I asked the infection question as I'm just worried as this is my first all grain and first time using liquid yeast. It is going too well for a first time only issue was my mash temp control. Dropped to about 143 at the end of the mash. Started at about 150. The floaters looked quite slimy compared to anything I have seen using dry yeast in my meads and extract brews.

Yes the foam was very white and puffy. Much like the star San foam.
 
you are perfectly fine my brother... from what you told me sounds like it will be amazing - also white foam is a nice indicator in my experience that the water profile was what was needed - so enjoy, wish i could have some
 
So, is the black inky looking stuff just light contrast, or was this dry hopped with a live octopus?
 
Thanks for all the replies and help. Really puts a guys mind at ease that all looks good.
 
I wonder why no-one mentioned to forego the secondary. It IS the major cause of problems and totally unnecessary unless you brew an "advanced" beer.

Now once you open up the bucket, it is either rack to secondary or package, since the headspace now contains air. Next time just keep in primary until ready to bottle, 3-4 weeks is fine and is what many of us do.

If you need to, suck some beer out with a skinny hose through the grommet hole to take your FG reading. In a sanitary way of course. Again, the less you tinker with your beer the better it will be.
 
(I have to disagree with the air in head space) I have never had a problem with headspace now having air - the air never really touches the beer (only does if a mild constant wind). - I have personally witness this effect with colored layers - as u open the lid of any container - yes some co2 leaves - but unless you are waving your hand back and forth or in a breeze (hope these conditions are not where your fermenter is) then there will remain a more dense layer of c02 protecting the beer from oxidation. also since it is still fermenting the co2 level will re rise and push all air out eventually. co2 is more dense than air and will remain even when the lid is open, just don't have a fan pointed at it when u open it. same principles as a chest freezer.

as for secondary - i agree not necessary with most beers - as long as temperature is not high and time frame is not over 5 weeks.
 
I think the best way to avoid an infection is to ignore it for 10 days. That's what I do.


Excellent advice worth repeating, don't be opening your fermenter checking on your beer like a newborn baby, every time you do your letting oxygen in, and if the beer is still, or "done fermenting" there will be no co2 to push the O2 out.
 
Well hopefully racking to secondary won't hurt me. The air lock is bubbling so in sure I pushed O2 out. I sanitized the hell out of everything so hopefully I am all good. Truthfully I wanted my fermentor empty so I could start another brew.
 
Also forgot to mention - people do open vessel fermentation all the time, myself included.
 
First ever all grain batch. Thought I sanitized everything really well but worried about this. Is this an infection or just yeast?View attachment 313048View attachment 313049

Nothing there consistent in appearance with an infected brew IMO. Package it up and you'll be in good shape. That would be my guess.

I don't favor placing a hydrometer in the FV or leaving it there for a few reasons primarily related to accuracy. These include.

1. Bubbles and yeast/hop debris will often obscure the view of the hydrometer's scale
2: Not possible to optimally view the hydrometer/meniscus interface at eye level
3: The wort temperature is not equal to the hydrometer's calibration temperature
4: The lid must be removed to take a reading increasing the potential for oxygen exposure
5: If leaving the hydrometer in the wort CO2 bubbles will adhere to the glass adding an upward buoyancy force. Also with leaving it in, any settling trub can settle on the shoulder of the instrument creating a downward force.

All small details but added up can lead to significant measurement error. If I am going to record data I want it to be as accurate as possible.

My process:

  • Pop off carboy top and airlock
  • Collect sample with sanitized SS turkey baster in a test jar
  • Replace carboy cap and airlock
  • Place hydrometer in sample
  • Cool sample and hydrometer to calibration temperature
  • Remove and reinsert hydrometer once at the target temperature to remove any bubbles adhering
  • Measure gravity and record.

Very repeatable and accurate.

OG and FG (recent example) OG and FG.jpg


Sample and hydrometer at correct temperatureCorrect Temperature Preboil.jpg


Calibration temperatures vary depending on the hydrometer.Hydrometer Calibration Points.jpg
 
Nothing there consistent in appearance with an infected brew IMO. Package it up and you'll be in good shape. That would be my guess.

I don't favor placing a hydrometer in the FV or leaving it there for a few reasons primarily related to accuracy. These include.

1. Bubbles and yeast/hop debris will often obscure the view of the hydrometer's scale
2: Not possible to optimally view the hydrometer/meniscus interface at eye level
3: The wort temperature is not equal to the hydrometer's calibration temperature
4: The lid must be removed to take a reading increasing the potential for oxygen exposure
5: If leaving the hydrometer in the wort CO2 bubbles will adhere to the glass adding an upward buoyancy force. Also with leaving it in, any settling trub can settle on the shoulder of the instrument creating a downward force.

All small details but added up can lead to significant measurement error. If I am going to record data I want it to be as accurate as possible.

My process:

  • Pop off carboy top and airlock
  • Collect sample with sanitized SS turkey baster in a test jar
  • Replace carboy cap and airlock
  • Place hydrometer in sample
  • Cool sample and hydrometer to calibration temperature
  • Remove and reinsert hydrometer once at the target temperature to remove any bubbles adhering
  • Measure gravity and record.

Very repeatable and accurate.

OG and FG (recent example)View attachment 313265


Sample and hydrometer at correct temperatureView attachment 313266


Calibration temperatures vary depending on the hydrometer.View attachment 313267

1. I agree.
2. Great examples of taking hydrometer readings and temperature.
3. Nice tile work.
4. Green?
 
Don't tell anyone, but the only way I ever take final gravity readings is by popping the lid off my bucket and dropping it right in there.
 
For the camp that thinks a hydrometer poses a greater infection risk than a wine thief or baster, what is your logic behind this? Personally, I don't take hydrometer readings in the vessel, but I don't see how a sanitized hydrometer poses more of a risk than a sanitized wine thief or baster. If anything, I would think it would pose less risk as it is smooth glass as opposed to a plastic thief that probably has more places for bacteria/yeast to hold on to.

I think anytime you open your beer up to "mess" with it you are risking infection. It is hard to be patient, but most ale yeasts with few exceptions (particular saison strains) have done what they are going to do in 5-7 days when it comes to sugar conversion.
 
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