is it just me? keg is better

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Steveruch

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I kegged part of a batch of porter (force carbed) and bottled the rest. I think the kegged part is better tasting.
 

eric19312

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I'm sure it is both process dependent and beer/age of beer dependent on which will taste better. A well done bottle conditioned beer properly chilled and poured without stirring up the yeast can be wonderful. Perhaps you stirred up some yeast on the bottled version when you poured? I'd expect a Porter to tend to benefit from some extra bottle conditioning. I also keg and bottle what doesn'f fit in the keg. I don't secondary so sometimes this means I am pulling too much yeast and trub trying to get one more bottle out of that fermentor.
 

cubalz

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Unless it is a high gravity beer that would benefit from ageing like a barley wine or RIS, I keg all of my beers. Tastes better and is far less work.
 

nymtber

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I agree, keg is better. Some beers have to be bottled, but I find most beers are just better kegged.

And so much less work! Then when I switched to the 1/2" auto-siphon and tubing...WOW!!! Transferring beer now is almost too easy!
 

MorBeer83

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Yesterday I bought my first 1.3 gal cornelius keg, I can't wait to try it!
Yes yes, I know is small, but here the price is big: roughly 100 bucks for it. :(

I want to emigrate in America :D:rockin:
 

JohnSand

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Yesterday I bought my first 1.3 gal cornelius keg, I can't wait to try it!
Yes yes, I know is small, but here the price is big: roughly 100 bucks for it. :(

I want to emigrate in America :D:rockin:
Small kegs are expensive here too. I think I paid more for my 2.5s than any of my 5 gallon kegs.
 

kh54s10

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I will go against the grain and say I don't find a difference. But I have never bottled and kegged a beer to make a direct comparison.

Kegging is so much easier though!
 
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Steveruch

Steveruch

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I'm sure it is both process dependent and beer/age of beer dependent on which will taste better. A well done bottle conditioned beer properly chilled and poured without stirring up the yeast can be wonderful. Perhaps you stirred up some yeast on the bottled version when you poured?
No, I am very careful when pouring a non wheat beer to avoid stirring things up.
I agree, A well done bottle conditioned beer properly chilled and poured without stirring up the yeast can be wonderful. Most of my beer gets bottled and will continue to be bottled; I can't afford to go to all kegs. I just noticed a preference for the kegged portion in this batch.
 

Mainer

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Kegging would be nice, but I cellar most of my batches, just because I don't drink as fast as I brew, so bottling makes more sense. Also, I give away a lot of beer, and it's easier to give away six-packs than growlers.
Also, the missus doesn't like the idea of having an aluminum cylinder of CO2 sitting in the cellar. She's worried about safety. I try not to point out that bottling means there are about 250 tiny glass cylinders of liquid and CO2 sitting in the cellar right now.
 

Trail

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Also, the missus doesn't like the idea of having an aluminum cylinder of CO2 sitting in the cellar. She's worried about safety.

I'm actually looking at a CO2 alarm for the same reason. My basement is stereotypically poorly ventilated and I'll have four kegs down there soon.
 
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chickypad

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One thing nice about kegging is you can be drinking the beers much sooner for styles that taste best fresh. I like my wheat beers as young as possible, especially with fruit I find fresher is better. The NEIPA I'm drinking now tasted amazing when I tapped it at 2 wks. It's about to kick and still tastes really good, but it was a bit better a week and a half ago. If bottling I would only be trying it about now.
 

seatazzz

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Once I started kegging I've never looked back. I occasionally fill a bottle or two from the keg for friends, only now when they ask if I want the bottle back the answer is usually no. I've got 70+ 22oz bottles gathering dust in my box room that I probably won't fill again, unless I brew something I want to age for a while. On the last couple of batches I used a sanitized pump setup to fill the kegs, takes even less time now and I'm done in about an hour from sanitizing everything to cleaning up.
 

Mainer

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One thing nice about kegging is you can be drinking the beers much sooner for styles that taste best fresh. I like my wheat beers as young as possible, especially with fruit I find fresher is better. The NEIPA I'm drinking now tasted amazing when I tapped it at 2 wks. It's about to kick and still tastes really good, but it was a bit better a week and a half ago. If bottling I would only be trying it about now.
Yeah. Being a bottler, I've pretty much given up on the idea of making US-style IPAs and APAs. I do lots of saisons, German-style lagers, stouts, and this summer, sours.
 
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