Is active yeast bad for you?

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rkovatch

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So I am a beginner of beginners. I made a batch of stout, but had too much water in my pot and ended up taking some of the wort while it was brewing so it didn't overflow. After it was all said and done I put the wort into the carboy, added the yeast and it fermented like normal. After the fermentation, I tasted it to see how it was. It was a little weak. I added more malt and yeast, but it didn't ferment. Is it ok to bottle, or do I have to do something to it to kill the yeast?
 

Rick_R

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After the fermentation, I tasted it to see how it was. It was a little weak. I added more malt and yeast, but it didn't ferment. Is it ok to bottle, or do I have to do something to it to kill the yeast?
First off, welcome to the HBT forum!

I wouldn't bottle unless I was sure it had finished and, particularly given the method you used, I'd want a hydrometer measurement to know for sure. If you don't have one, get with a local homebrew shop or order one on line; it won't hurt for your beer to stay in the fermenter for a while longer.

Some other questions (including from Revvy):
1 - how long has it been since you first brewed and added the yeast?
2 - how long has it been since you had the second batch of malt extract and yeast?
3 - at what temperature(s) has the fermenter been?

As to tasting "weak" are you talking alcohol-wise or taste/mouth-feel? Aging helps the second one considerably. I always taste the samples (well, actually, drink the samples) I take and you could describe the taste as weak, flavor-wise, before it has had some time to age.

What was the stout recipe?

Rick
 

Nurmey

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Lots going on with this thread!
Welcome to HBT! Glad you stopped by because we don't want you to get hurt by bottle bombs, which could happen if you bottle now without knowing what's going on with your brew.

Live yeast is good for you. It's chocked full of vitamin B. Live yeast is how homebrews make and carbonate their beer. It stays alive even after it's bottled.

More importantly is Revvy's question. How long since you added more malt and yeast? There could still be lots of fermentables in that bucket with live yeast which equals bottle bombs if bottled before it's finished. A hydrometer will tell the story.

For future brewing reference, don't ever judge a brew before it's finished, bottled, and aged. Your stout was probably fine before you messed with it. Uncarbonated, green beer almost always tastes watery and blah.
 
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rkovatch

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Rick,

Thanks for the quick reply. It was an Imperial Stout. I should definitely get a hydrometer. I waited for the temp to get down to 70 degrees, then added the yeast the first time. It sat for four weeks. I tasted it and it was kind of weak flavor-wise. I was thinking that it was weak because I ended up taking some of the malt out during the boiling. So, in my infinite wisdom I added some malt and then added the yeast on top of it. It has been sitting for 11 days with the second yeast in it. What do you think?

Thanks,
Ryan
 

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Thanks for the quick reply. It was an Imperial Stout. I should definitely get a hydrometer. I waited for the temp to get down to 70 degrees, then added the yeast the first time. It sat for four weeks. I tasted it and it was kind of weak flavor-wise. I was thinking that it was weak because I ended up taking some of the malt out during the boiling. So, in my infinite wisdom I added some malt and then added the yeast on top of it. It has been sitting for 11 days with the second yeast in it. What do you think?
I'll hop in.

One click is enough there Ryan.:)

I think you should get a hydrometer ASAP and ask how to use it if you are unsure. You added fermentable sugars and indicate that it did not ferment so you need a base to determine if the gravity is good for bottling or you may end up with gushers or bombs.
 
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rkovatch

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Sounds like I need a hydrometer. I will get one today and go from there. Thanks for the help.

Ryan
 

HOOTER

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Sounds like I need a hydrometer. I will get one today and go from there. Thanks for the help.

Ryan
Once you get that hydrometer, make sure you have consistent readings over multiple days before bottling. If your gravity readings continue to drop, it's still fermenting. It's hard to calculate your projected FG but if you post your recipe including approximately how much wort you lost and what you added to compensate we can give you an estimate. Leaving an imperial stout in secondary for an extended period of time is not a bad thing so don't rush.
 

Desert_Sky

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Active yeast usually means either you or your significant other will be sleeping on the couch.
 

rescue brew

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Active yeast usually means either you or your significant other will be sleeping on the couch.

My first home brew experience was awesome. My wife and I had a great evening sanitizing, measuring and timing the whole process. We were drinking some New Glarus we picked up in Madison, WI. I'll never forget it.

Later that night, I was dreaming about thick head beer and bubbling wort. Reliving my evening making that first batch. I swear, I could smell the brew pot! Suddenly I woke up, ran to the bathroom, and began praying to the white thrown in a language NO ONE likes to speak in. BBBLLLLAAAHHHH !!!

Turns out you shouldn't sample the brew after the yeast has been pitched. silly noob
 
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