IPA to Rye IPA

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adempsey10

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After many failed attempts to brew a good IPA I finally got it down and I'm really satisfied with it. My next experiment will be to move on to a Rye IPA (my favourite). I'm hoping that rather than concoct a completely new recipe I can modify my current IPA recipe to include the rye grain. I was hoping someone out there might be able to give some pointers as to which malts I should scale back or alter to make the Rye work.

Here's the current grain bill

2 Row - 82.6%
Victory - 11%
Crystal 10L - 1.8%
Biscuit - 4.6%

(3.5L batch)
2g Centennial 60min
2g Cascade 30min
4g Cascade 20min
2g Willamette 15min
2g Cascade 10min
6g Amarillo 5min
10g Amarillo - Flameout

I've thought about swapping out some of the hops with more spicy earthy aromas rather than citrusy to complement the Rye grain. I've also considered dropping the Crystal and a portion of the biscuit to replace with the Rye. Something like:

2 Row - 82.6%
Victory - 11%
Rye - 3%
Biscuit - 3.4%

Thoughts?
 

saltymirv

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If that's the recipe you like, then just sub rye for basemalt, leaving the specialty malts. I would start with 10-15% and see how you like it. Some people use up to 25% in Rye IPAs. Other styles, like roggenbier use like 50% rye
 

Onkel_Udo

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I use 30% Rye in my Lawnmower RyePA. It took a few iterations to come to that working up from 18% for 25%, etc. Everyone has their threshold of "can't taste it at all" vs "Crap, so much I ruined it". At my percentages, the Biscuit would disappear and the Victory would be a waste.

Mine is 35% Pale, 32% Munich, 30% Rye, 3% Special B (because I put it in almost everything). I hop a lot lighter than an American IPA...closer to an APA but with a decent amount of Centennial or Cascade as a dry hoop in the keg.
 
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