Improved burner performance.

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eschatz

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thats like a steam jacket! nice find. However, i wonder if this would be safe with a propane burner because of the high heat. I dont know but that outside sheath would get SERIOUSLY hot with a propane burner unless it was made from much more heat resistant materials. I hope someone more knowledgable about this type of thing chimes in because I'm curious also. :mug:
 

fratermus

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It might improve efficiency of a brewpot, but the sides would likely have to be removable for full pot handling. At that point it reminds me of the shielding foil or sheetmetal barriers that folks in windy/cold places use.

Anyhow, it's got to be [ame="www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBLr_XrooLs"]safer than liquid oxygen[/ame]. <-- oldie but goodie.
 

pjj2ba

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Orfy,

That probably would help to focus the heat on the pot.

Try searching for "turbo stoves". This is what I would do if I wanted to do a wood fired boil. I've looked into them as a possible way to heat my pig cooker. They are more technically called gasification stoves I think. I sort of understand them. Basically, by preheating the combustion air, and your fuel, one can actually convert the fuel to a gas which is what really burns. There are a number of designs on the web including ones where a handfull of rice chaff or straw is all that is needed to cook a meal. Very efficient and little ash is produced. They are really being pushed in third world countries that nore rely on simple inefficient wood fires

I think this kind of charcoal starter may operate on a similar principle, although maybe not quite as efficient. I love these things as it only take 3 pages of newspaper to start the coals - and fast too. Waaaay better than lighter fluid. They aren't bad for a makeshift fire pit on a cool evening either. They throw out a lot of heat



I suspect that one could make one of these even more efficient such that it might be able to do a full boil if set under a pot. I bet you could even pack it with kindling sized wood and use that instead of buying charcoal. One would need to add an outer sleeve to it, leaving maybe a 1/2 inch gap so the combustion air would be pre-heated by flowing over the hot sides of the combustion chamber. I might just have to try this with mine. I wonder if one could simply find a metal can just a bit bigger in diameter and a couple inches shorter such that a charcoal starter sans handle would fit. I might let it get started and then lower it into the bucket.
 

zoebisch01

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Absolutely could. I think now that people are starting to feel the pinch of fuel costs, we may see more ideas like the Vita stove being revisited.
 

jpgilman

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Do you think this principle could benefit a propane set up?

Aprovecho Research Center
I don't see why it wouldn't. The notion of forcing the hot gases to flow better around the side of the pot seems like a no-brainier. But how much this sort of design would make a material difference to time to boil is unclear to me. We need a mechanical engineer to jump in here and give us a lecture on thermodynamics.

There are a number of interesting ideas on the site. Nice find.

John
 

Clayton

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i think the main thing that stove does is to utlize more surface area of the pot ,
thermal dinamics holds the heat to the bottom of the pot but after is makes it to the edge it spreads off the side wall fast from turbulance and disapation.

adding a sheet metal jacket that was 1/4 inch in diamiter larger that your keggal should have the same effect and channle more heal in to the water
 
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Orfy

Orfy

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i think the main thing that stove does is to utlize more surface area of the pot ,
thermal dinamics holds the heat to the bottom of the pot but after is makes it to the edge it spreads off the side wall fast from turbulance and disapation.

adding a sheet metal jacket that was 1/4 inch in diamiter larger that your keggal should have the same effect and channle more heal in to the water
That is part of it but the other part is the fact that you are burning hydrogen in the form of wood gas. It is much more efficient then the partial burning of wood. It is cleaner with a lot less soot and smoke.
Also as you say the heat is forced agains a lager area of the pot.

I have not yet finalised on the design I would like to use.
A lot depends on what components I can get for free. I have no budget for this.
 

beerthirty

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This is off topic. Orfy, BigK is correct. NO2 is a catalyst. It requires heat(570*F) to break the Nitrogen/Oxygen bond. O2 itself wont burn and neither will a mix of O2 and NO2. Add something that will burn and the heat of combustion will break the bonds in NO2 enriching the O2 levels and creating more heat. Anything that will burn at 570F can be the fuel to react with the NO2. Likewise without the presence of O2 you cant get a burn so the NO2 cant release its bound O2. It takes two to tango, but three will make it exciting.
For your original post. Build a pot retaining ring about 4-5" high that is welded to the stand that the pot would sit inside with about 1" space around the pot. The heat and exhaust from the propane burn would be chimneyed up between the pot and ring turning the bottom 4-5" of the pot plus the bottom into a heating surface. You could make the ring higher but I don't know the physics of diminishing return. Anyway 5 " around the circumference of the pot should greatly increase(double?) the surface area exposed to the heat.

OOps sorry Orfy, reread the thread and realized I had misunderstood what you said. drunken embarrassment abounds.
 
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