American IPA Imminent Rueage American IPA

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jswillbrewforbeer

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Joined
Mar 2, 2017
Messages
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Location
The Port City
Recipe Type
All Grain
Yeast
Wyeast 1056
Yeast Starter
Yes
Additional Yeast or Yeast Starter
1L starter, calculate yours appropriately
Batch Size (Gallons)
4.875
Original Gravity
1.058
Final Gravity
1.011
Boiling Time (Minutes)
60
IBU
94
Color
6.2 SRM
Primary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp)
14
Secondary Fermentation (# of Days & Temp)
NA
Additional Fermentation
NA
Tasting Notes
Bright hop display in both flavor and aroma, (juicy sweet orange, grapefruit, pineapple, sharp herbal.) Bitterness is assertive and lingers but not at all overpowering. Clean grainy malt, clean fermentation. Medium body, very smooth and creamy.
This is a pretty basic, Old School West Coast American IPA, inspired by the greats, like Humalupalicious. This beer hasn't been through any competitions but my wife and I love it, (my wife is very particular about beer so I feel that this beer was very successful!)

Ca 72, Mg 11, Na 11, Cl 60, SO4 120, HCO 39
Mash at 152F, 75 minutes
1.5 qts water/lbs grist
Sparge at 160F

99% Briess Pale Malt, 1.8L
1% Dingmans Special B, 148L

Magnum @ 60 to 94 IBU
5.7 grams/gallon each of Cascade, Centennial and Columbus @ flameout
5.7 grams/gallon each of Cascade, Centennial and Columbus @ dryhop, last 4 days of primary

Chill to 64F, diffuse pure O2 for 60 seconds and pitch slurry from yeast starter, (use an online calculator to determine what size yeast starter you need, I targeted .75 million cells/ml wort/ degree plato.) Hold at 64F for the first 48 hours of active fermentation. After that, start ramping temperature 1F every 12 hours until 70F is reached and hold there until the last day of primary at which point the beer is cold crashed to 45F, kegged and force carbed to around 2.5 volumes of CO2. Serve fresh, won't stay hoppy and delicious long. Enjoy!

20200418_184912.jpg
 
Last edited:

Steven Barrett

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I’m curious why the 1% special B not the 10% Crystal 40 - isn’t that more typical?

I do like that old school Cs hopping schedule.
 
OP
J

jswillbrewforbeer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2017
Messages
135
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184
Location
The Port City
I brewed this beer to style guidelines and personal taste. The Special B is for just enough color and minimal effect on flavor. The style needs to be well attenuated and doesn't need much malt character. IPAs with a heavy percentage of Crystal malt tend to taste syrupy sweet to me so I prefer a simple, clean malt presentation. Cheers!
 

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