I'll never brew without rice hulls again

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BierMuncher

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Used them for the first time tonight since I had an 11% Rye Malt recipe.

Man was it nice. On my batch sparge, the grain bed was compacted as usual, but as soon as I stuck my paddle in there to mix it around, that grain bed just fluffed right up and settled back nice and loose.

With an 11% rye malt grain bill, I expected trouble, even with the rice hulls (.5# for a 15# grain bill). It was the fastest, cleanest sparge I've ever had.

Coincidentally, overshot my target OG by 5 points. I think that fluffier grain bed must be more prone to releasing the sugars.

Glad I bought 10#'s of the stuff. With only 1/2 pound needed per batch, it's a bargain for easy sparging.
 

BuffaloSabresBrewer

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Just picked some up for when I make you Boulevard What this weekend. I hope they work as well as you say and improve my efficiency.
 

ohiobrewtus

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I've only used them on recipes that were heavy in flakes, I may need to rethink that now.
 

Ryanh1801

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I can't say I have ever noticed Rice hull's really helping. I have done some high percentage rye beers and never had a problem.
 
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BierMuncher

BierMuncher

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enohcs said:
will you use rice hulls in future recipes where 100% malted barley is used?
If the grain bill is heavy enough.

It isn't just the flaked grains that slow a sparge but also:

I crush pretty aggressivley...

I use a 10 gallon round cooler and that tall/narrow configuration can get pretty compacted with a 24# grain bill...

I tend to let my mash sit for 90 minutes (especially if mashing at the low end of 148-149 for a lighter, dryer beer). That additional time seems to allow the bed to really settle tightly. (I also pick up 4-5 additional points with an extended mash time;))

Next time I repeat a 100% barley recipe, I'll use some and see if they really do improve efficiency or if I just had a lucky night this last time.
 
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