IKEA Dryck Lingon experiment

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum:

OP
OP
Jayjay1976
Joined
Nov 26, 2016
Messages
4,880
Reaction score
5,894
Location
Chicago
This IKEA $#!t is getting seriöus...
Next batch: BLØØBS!

20211214_190059.jpg
20211214_190237.jpg
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
Jayjay1976
Joined
Nov 26, 2016
Messages
4,880
Reaction score
5,894
Location
Chicago
Ran the first half of the lingonberry wine, yield was 400ml @40%; tomorrow I'll add this to the rest of the wine and run it together. The combined distillate will then be run a third and final time very slowly, making small cuts to pick apart the good stuff and the flavorful stuff before blending those back together to produce the final bottle. Finished abv is still TBD, I'll dilute it to 500ml volume including the bit of fruit syrup I reserved to sweeten and flavor the final product. Skål!
20211221_144035.jpg
20211221_144309.jpg
20211221_200905.jpg
20211221_201103.jpg
 

bracconiere

Jolly Alcoholic
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 19, 2018
Messages
25,129
Reaction score
14,940
Location
S.AZ
OP
OP
Jayjay1976
Joined
Nov 26, 2016
Messages
4,880
Reaction score
5,894
Location
Chicago
This is a description of how I make cuts, YMMV.

I usually try to take about 8-12 cuts, starting off pretty small and as the hearts come on I'll make them a bit larger. When i start to detect a whiff of tails, I'll go back to smaller cuts because a lot of flavor is in the tails and later I can go back and use my nose to pick out the good ones to blend back in. To my nose, very early tails smell a bit like hazelnuts or pralines, I'll cut it right there. The next one or two tails cuts are typically nasty, the next few will be hit or miss, some of it flavorful, some smelling like wet cardboard, then as the run peters out the rest of it will be bad. I stop when the head temp reaches 205-208, when the abv is almost zero.

Next, I'll combine the hearts with the flavorful fractions from tails; this is the good jar, then take all of the rest, water it down a bit, and run it again. This run will follow the same pattern; harsh heads, a shorter hearts cut, then tails again. The good stuff from this batch will be 1/4 to 1/3 the volume of the good jar. Sometimes I combine them, but usually I'll age them separately on different types of wood or different char levels. All of the rest goes into a faints jug to be mixed with miscellaneous other leftovers.

IME, every run no matter what you put in will have some proportion of good stuff, because the same constituents come over at the same head temps; in this way you can recover a great deal of good stuff and of course, anything that gets messed up in blending or just has an unpleasant flavor, can be salvaged. Important to note that anything you run should be diluted to 40%, this is both a safety precaution, and also, a lot of the congeners are water soluble and so this will allow you to effectively pull out more clean ethanol, leaving the bad stuff behind in the boiler.

Its also surprising that even when I run a whole batch of "good" stuff, at the end what remains in the boiler always smells nasty. This is how to obtain higher purity neutrals, distill 3 or more times before it is clean enough to make flavored spirits like gin or absinthe.
 
Last edited:

bracconiere

Jolly Alcoholic
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 19, 2018
Messages
25,129
Reaction score
14,940
Location
S.AZ
I also have a tripel I brewed back in Feb still waiting to be kegged.

shooting for a three pointer might not be as cool as a slam dunk, but then it'd just be a dubbel....and yes, i just have to make noise to stay tuned.

(don't want the ratings to fall and it get cancelled! :mug:)
 

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing
Staff member
Mod
HBT Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
19,932
Reaction score
10,204
Location
Pasadena, MD
I am new to homebrewing, you didn’t add an airlock to this ikea beverage dispenser? Is it a must?
In the picture @Jayjay1976 posted in post #47 there is a paper towel between the glass jar and lid. The lid is probably not tightly screwed down either. Fermentation gasses an escape through that, but it's not an airlock, as air can get inside through it too.

Homebrewers (or people who routinely ferment things at home) are resourceful and find many ways to achieve their goals and experiments.
 
OP
OP
Jayjay1976
Joined
Nov 26, 2016
Messages
4,880
Reaction score
5,894
Location
Chicago
In the picture @Jayjay1976 posted in post #47 there is a paper towel between the glass jar and lid. The lid is probably not tightly screwed down either. Fermentation gasses an escape through that, but it's not an airlock, as air can get inside through it too.

Homebrewers (or people who routinely ferment things at home) are resourceful and find many ways to achieve their goals and experiments.
That's correct, the paper towel allows passive venting to prevent any pressure from building up inside the fermenter. Since this batch of wine was destined to be distilled, I wasn't concerned about infection, and because I wasn't going to let it sit very long, oxidation was also not an issue.

I think it would be very easy to drill a hole in the provided lid to insert a grommet and airlock to use this setup to ferment other things.
 
Top