idofor in a spray bottle

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

cpz28

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
69
Reaction score
0
When ever I sanitize my fermentor,bottling bucket, carboy ect. , I always fill up a spray bottle with the idofor solution and use it later on. I've read some posts on here saying that idophor loses it's effectiveness in a few hours. So if I have it sealed in a spray bottle does it lose its effectiveness? Is doing this bad practice?
 

surfbrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2007
Messages
290
Reaction score
0
Location
SLO County, CA
I wouldn't say that it loses any effectiveness over a few hours but it definently loses power from one day to the next. I also use a spray bottle with idophor and have had no problems as long as I use the solution the same day. Anything over that and I make up a new batch.

Cheers
 

billtzk

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2007
Messages
1,617
Reaction score
23
Location
Dallas
I sometimes keep it more than 24 hours but rarely more than 48. Purchased by the quart it is pretty cheap as sanitizers go.

Here's an interesting article about Iodophor that another brewer wrote. He included information he obtained from discussions with the general manager of B.T.F., who is also a medical microbiologist. B.T.F. is the company that makes the Iodophor that is most often sold in home brew shops.
 

DAAB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2005
Messages
379
Reaction score
5
Chlorine in tap water denatures the iodine in iodophor fairly quickly. If you make it up with filtered water or shop bought water it will last for weeks if not months. Similarly Star San must be made with a low carbonate water, in most cases tap water isn't suitable so there is no advantage over one or the other in this respect. Using iodophor in a spray is an economical and effective way to sanitise.
 

Revvy

Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
41,288
Reaction score
3,729
Location
"Detroitish" Michigan
Over the holidays I was listenning to a bunch of archived podcasts on TBN and Basic Brewing Radio. On one of the shows, I can't recall which, they recommended using RO or Distilled water if using idophor in a spray bottle for quick sanitization.

I dunno...After I'm finished with my bottle of idophor I'm planning to switch to star san myself. I never did like the iodiney smell of idophor.

Plus I don't fear the foam!
 

SixFoFalcon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2007
Messages
498
Reaction score
12
Location
Flourtown
Revvy said:
Over the holidays I was listenning to a bunch of archived podcasts on TBN and Basic Brewing Radio. On one of the shows, I can't recall which, they recommended using RO or Distilled water if using idophor in a spray bottle for quick sanitization.

I dunno...After I'm finished with my bottle of idophor I'm planning to switch to star san myself. I never did like the iodiney smell of idophor.

Plus I don't fear the foam!
Yep, I was thinking of the same BBR podcast. It was in the Q&A section at the beginning, as a follow up to one of the Iodophor segments from a previous 'cast.

The bottom line was that the properties advertised on the bottle reflect assumptions of "real world" conditions, and not ideal conditions. So if you use tap water that isn't 100% pure, and you expect it to kill "x" amount of microorganisms, you need to use the ratio on the bottle and it will only be effective for so many hours if you leave it sitting around exposed to the air in a bucket, for example. But if you take those variables and get them closer to the "ideal" conditions, shelf life will improve remarkably. They just can't market it that way if anyone other than an experienced lab technician is expected to be using it. :D

Using RO or pure distilled water, and putting it in a clean spray bottle, away from heat, light, etc. will make it last much longer than a few hours. As DAAB points out, ideal conditions can easily extend the shelf life into the weeks and months. And if you are using it on surfaces that are very clean to begin with (not much bio-load), you won't have much to worry about.
 

denimglen

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2006
Messages
437
Reaction score
1
Location
Auckland, New Zealand
I've used it after it's been sitting in a spray bottle for up to a week for sanitising small things - although if I was brewing a new batch of beer I would make up more iodophor to be on the safe side. I haven't seemed to have had any problems yet but I do keep the iodophor mixture in the kegerator. Might stop keeping it though.
 
Top