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I want more malty flavor.

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NitrouStang96

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So I have this beer that has some characteristics not unlike a Karl Strauss Amber Lager. But mine is certainly a bit less sweet and malty. So I got to thinking I would use 50% more amber DME next time. And then I got to thinking that maybe this wouldn't increase my malty flavor but maybe only increase the alcohol content.

I'm not quite sure, being new and all. Help me out! Can I just up the DME for more malty flavor?
 

rocketman768

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Using more malt will indeed increase the malty flavor AS WELL AS the alcohol content. You should maybe shoot for an extra 5 or 10 gravity points. You can also get more malt flavor by using some of the caramel malts like Vienna or Munich. The final possibility is backing off on the hops. It will let more of the malt character shine through.
 
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NitrouStang96

NitrouStang96

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Thanks! Can you steep Munich? I know you can't steep Vienna... If you can't steep Munich, is there something else I can steep for more malt flavor, like Crystal 10L?
 

rocketman768

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NitrouStang96 said:
Thanks! Can you steep Munich? I know you can't steep Vienna... If you can't steep Munich, is there something else I can steep for more malt flavor, like Crystal 10L?
Who says you can't steep Vienna? Steeped Vienna is in many good recipes. And you can steep Munich. If you want a honey-like flavor, stick with steeping the light crystals like the 10L you mentioned. If you want a more caramel-like flavor, go darker like the 60L.

Also, make sure you appropriately adjust the DME or LME you use to hit the OG that you want.
 

Got Trub?

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Vienna and Munich are malted barley just like 2-row or 6-row or pilsner malt. They should be mashed in order to convert their starch content into sugars and impart that malty flavour. If you steep them you will get little flavour and alot of unfermentable starch. Crystal malt can be steeped. The starches have already been converted into sugar and then caramelized to varying degrees.
 

rocketman768

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Got Trub? said:
Vienna and Munich are malted barley just like 2-row or 6-row or pilsner malt. They should be mashed in order to convert their starch content into sugars and impart that malty flavour. If you steep them you will get little flavour and alot of unfermentable starch. Crystal malt can be steeped. The starches have already been converted into sugar and then caramelized to varying degrees.
Right. Unfermentable starch is what makes the beer a little thicker without really upping the alcohol no?
 

Bearcat Brewmeister

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rocketman768 said:
Right. Unfermentable starch is what makes the beer a little thicker without really upping the alcohol no?
Unfermentable complex sugars is what makes beer heavier. Plain starches will make your beer cloudy.


NitrouStang96 said:
So I have this beer that has some characteristics not unlike a Karl Strauss Amber Lager. But mine is certainly a bit less sweet and malty. So I got to thinking I would use 50% more amber DME next time. And then I got to thinking that maybe this wouldn't increase my malty flavor but maybe only increase the alcohol content.

I'm not quite sure, being new and all. Help me out! Can I just up the DME for more malty flavor?
I do not know what yeast you are using, but I would recommend a yeast that attenuates less, like WLP002/1968. It leaves more residual sugar and gives the beer a sweeter/heavier taste.
 
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NitrouStang96

NitrouStang96

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Bearcat Brewmeister said:
I do not know what yeast you are using, but I would recommend a yeast that attenuates less, like WLP002/1968. It leaves more residual sugar and gives the beer a sweeter/heavier taste.
Ah, excellent. This sounds like the best route for what I am trying to achieve. Actually, it sounds perfect, so thanks! I have been using Nottingham. I have heard here that it attenuates well (75-80% ?) - how far does WLP002/1968 attenuate?
 

Kai

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Wyeast 1968 attenuates to about 69%, I believe. It is the yeast from Fuller's - that gives you an idea of some of its flavour characteristics.
 

david_42

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"Aromatic Malt will lend a distinct, almost exaggerated malt aroma and flavor to the finished Ales and Lagers. Aromatic malt also has a rich color and is high in diastatic power for aid in starch conversion." So, you can mash/steep it at 150F without any other grains.
 

TexLaw

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If you are not mashing, I recommend the crystal malts over the others. You can get by with small amounts of the other stuff, though.

You also can back off on your bittering hops a bit. There are lots of dials you can turn to increase maltiness in a beer.


TL
 
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